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Author Topic: UNC -- Why they are slow  (Read 5901 times)

skinsfan123

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Re: UNC -- Why they are slow
« Reply #10 on: March 28, 2008, 11:11:40 AM »
I have roughly a 10% chance of getting into UNC. I am not from the state and my numbers hit their averages almost exactly. This means I am a probably a weak candidate. However, something of the things I've been reading suggest that the approach to admissions at UNC might be counter productive. Wouldn't it make more sense for the school, if as underfunded as a few here have mentioned, to bring in more out of state students to increase their revenue base? Is my logic off? I hope this year they realize that and milk us out of state students for all we are worth. I would gladly forgo second and third year in-state tuition to go to UNC. Though their employment numbers are sub par, the quality of life is practically unmatched, and their reputation is as far reaching as almost any in the top 10-40.  I wish there was a way you could opt for that on the application.

Pixies

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Re: UNC -- Why they are slow
« Reply #11 on: March 28, 2008, 11:16:49 AM »
I have roughly a 10% chance of getting into UNC. I am not from the state and my numbers hit their averages almost exactly. This means I am a probably a weak candidate. However, something of the things I've been reading suggest that the approach to admissions at UNC might be counter productive. Wouldn't it make more sense for the school, if as underfunded as a few here have mentioned, to bring in more out of state students to increase their revenue base? Is my logic off? I hope this year they realize that and milk us out of state students for all we are worth. I would gladly forgo second and third year in-state tuition to go to UNC. Though their employment numbers are sub par, the quality of life is practically unmatched, and their reputation is as far reaching as almost any in the top 10-40.  I wish there was a way you could opt for that on the application.

While I see your point about out of stater's bringing more revenue, the whole thing with state schools is that they are heavily funded by tax payers. This creates 2 issues with out-of-state students. The first is that they are more likely to go out of state after grad, therefore not contributing through the school via taxes. Second, tax-payers would probably get pretty annoyed if their state school was discriminating against state residents.

Fangoria

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Re: UNC -- Why they are slow
« Reply #12 on: March 28, 2008, 11:31:03 AM »
I have roughly a 10% chance of getting into UNC. I am not from the state and my numbers hit their averages almost exactly. This means I am a probably a weak candidate. However, something of the things I've been reading suggest that the approach to admissions at UNC might be counter productive. Wouldn't it make more sense for the school, if as underfunded as a few here have mentioned, to bring in more out of state students to increase their revenue base? Is my logic off? I hope this year they realize that and milk us out of state students for all we are worth. I would gladly forgo second and third year in-state tuition to go to UNC. Though their employment numbers are sub par, the quality of life is practically unmatched, and their reputation is as far reaching as almost any in the top 10-40.  I wish there was a way you could opt for that on the application.

While I see your point about out of stater's bringing more revenue, the whole thing with state schools is that they are heavily funded by tax payers. This creates 2 issues with out-of-state students. The first is that they are more likely to go out of state after grad, therefore not contributing through the school via taxes. Second, tax-payers would probably get pretty annoyed if their state school was discriminating against state residents.

TITCR, and, in addition, even if they wanted to let in more out of staters, I'm pretty sure they have a hard cap of 35% out of state students imposed by the state legislature
Done and Done, I think

UNAS

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Re: UNC -- Why they are slow
« Reply #13 on: March 28, 2008, 11:38:13 AM »
On the leaked US News, UNC has the worst employment stats in the top 60.

I am sorry I am just not convinced that George Mason places better than UNC. UNC has more national pull than GMU based on their name and what we have seen evidenced in the Ciolli study

skinsfan123

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Re: UNC -- Why they are slow
« Reply #14 on: March 28, 2008, 12:39:39 PM »

While I see your point about out of stater's bringing more revenue, the whole thing with state schools is that they are heavily funded by tax payers. This creates 2 issues with out-of-state students. The first is that they are more likely to go out of state after grad, therefore not contributing through the school via taxes. Second, tax-payers would probably get pretty annoyed if their state school was discriminating against state residents.
[/quote]


I guess I am just bitter because I am from Virginia and our state schools have among the highest rates of out-of-state attendees in the country.

I wish there was an option, much like ROTC, where you contractually commit to staying in the state for 3 or 4 years after graduation with the penalty of having your degree revoked or something. I know this brings up incalculable legal issues, but it'd be cool for people like me if they developed this.

What is the best way to show that you are committed to a state school in another state? How can I allay their fears that I would leave after 3 years? I believe this was a significant factor in my waitlisting at UF, another school I'd really like to attend.

bryan9584

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Re: UNC -- Why they are slow
« Reply #15 on: April 03, 2008, 03:47:27 PM »
I got impatient yesterday and called the admissions office. The lady i spoke to, who was nice, said that UNC normally does admissions later than other schools and are still in the process of reviewing applications. She asked for my information and told me that my application is under review right now, so "no news is good news". She also informed me that they will first email me and then send a letter about their decision, but as the website says, a decision should be made by May 1. I also noticed on lsn that one person was notified email on April 2nd that they were accepted, so there is still hope for those that are waiting. I'm going to give it til next week and then call again because i'm going to have to send in a seat-deposit somewhere soon.

On a side note, i'm not sure if UNC is my first choice, but i would like to know if it is among them. My numbers are 159/3.97 so i fit into UNC's range, but i'm just worried about being out of state (from what i understand, the legislature mandates 75% come from in-state).

bwildunc

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Re: UNC -- Why they are slow
« Reply #16 on: April 03, 2008, 04:39:34 PM »
I was accepted by UNC via email yesterday (3.5 gpa, 166 LSAT, in state).  I know of at least one other person who was accepted yesterday also (and there were several other acceptances posted on LSN as well).  The email said there is an admitted students day April 11th and a deposit due April 14th.

I went complete in November so the wait was definitely irritating but I currently live in Chapel Hill and I'm not looking to leave so I'm pretty excited I got in.

To those still waiting, good luck, you still have hope...

bryan9584

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Re: UNC -- Why they are slow
« Reply #17 on: April 07, 2008, 09:44:17 PM »
Notified via email tonight that i am waitlisted. It says the waitlist is unranked and there will be more information when i receive the letter they are sending.

limegreen

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Re: UNC -- Why they are slow
« Reply #18 on: April 07, 2008, 09:51:44 PM »
If I haven't gotten an acceptance email or WL email yet does that mean I'm rejected?!

TNGA60

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Re: UNC -- Why they are slow
« Reply #19 on: April 07, 2008, 09:55:39 PM »
If I haven't gotten an acceptance email or WL email yet does that mean I'm rejected?!

I sure hope not. I have not either. I applied in late January, when did you apply?