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Author Topic: Ask AdmissionsConsultants  (Read 11782 times)

Amy Johnson

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Re: Ask AdmissionsConsultants
« Reply #80 on: March 27, 2008, 07:53:34 PM »
Amy:

Thanks for your answers again. I have another question about the process that I think many people on this board have been clamoring to know.

Do Adcomms really read this deeply into applications? Materials and books that are available say that our essays are read, and grade trends evaluated, changes in LSAT scores considered. But the limited data that we have for most schools through Lawschoolnumbers and other sources seem to point to very solid cutoff figures that can only be derived through a formulaic approach to the admissions process. Some examples from this cycle:

http://www.lawschoolnumbers.com/graphs.php?&cycle=5&school_code=0007
At GULC, a 3.7 and 167 is virtually a guaranteed acceptance, while anything below is virtually a guaranteed rejection. UCLA seems to have the exact same hard cutoff:

http://www.lawschoolnumbers.com/graphs.php?&cycle=5&school_code=0020


With placement distribution at these schools this tightly defined, do soft factors, upward grade trends, writing sample quality and other non-numerical factors really matter?

Thanks again, Amy!

Hi again Daretel,

Believe it or not, with very few exceptions, all files get read from cover to cover.  Not all, of course, will be read with the same time and attention.  ;)

By relying on the data you cite, you are making some big assumptions.  Remember that the data is – as you admit - incomplete (a lot of self-selection on who posts and what gets posted) and who is to say that the information that is posted is true? 


The best way to think about the admission cycle is that the GPA and LSAT are starting points for law schools, creating presumptions about where applicants fall in the pool.  Most schools have a point of presumptive admit/reject, but both groups are still read.  Subjective factors become extremely important for candidates in the middle of the pool – this makes up the bulk of any school’s pool, even though the 'middle' of the pool varies tremendously measured by objective criteria from school to school. 

Amy
Amy Johnson
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AdmissionsConsultants Inc.
ajohnson@admissionsconsultants.com

Amy Johnson

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Re: Ask AdmissionsConsultants
« Reply #81 on: March 27, 2008, 08:09:36 PM »
Here's a question -- what, exactly, distinguishes a waitlist candidate from a reject (discounting candidates who are far, far below the 25%)?  The numbers for most schools on LSN don't seem to support quite as clear a cutoff numbers-wise between waitlists and rejects vs. waitlists and acceptances.  Obviously this is different for every school . . . but generally?

I ask because I'm waitlisted at a bunch of places, and a lot of them were real hail mary applications to places where I didn't think I had a chance of even a waitlist.  But that really puts me on the low-end of the waitlist in terms of numbers at a lot of these places, which makes me think that my probability of eventual acceptance is EXTREMELY low . . . which makes me wonder why they put me on the waitlist instead of rejecting me in the first place?
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Hi Dischord,

These schools must have seen something they liked.  Waitlists can be complex creatures.  In addition to protecting both the median GPA and LSAT of the entering class AND the yield on acceptances, admission officers have to keep a close eye on ethnic diversity, gender representation, and geographic representation, among numerous other things. 

That's not really an answer to your question - but rather some additional food for thought.  Again, if they had thought your file wasn't competitive or interesting, they would have outright rejected you.

Amy

Amy
Amy Johnson
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AdmissionsConsultants Inc.
ajohnson@admissionsconsultants.com

Amy Johnson

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Re: Ask AdmissionsConsultants
« Reply #82 on: March 27, 2008, 08:16:25 PM »
Amy:

Thanks for helping us all out here.  A couple questions.  First, I have one scholarship that I want to leverage with another school for a larger scholarship.  One deposit is due 4/1 and the other 4/4.  Much more money is due to the school on 4/4 that is my higher choice.  Would it be wrong to send in the deposit at both to give me more time to try to get more money?  What is your opinion on having more than one deposit down at once anyway (this might be necessary if someone hasn't been able to visit both schools, etc.)?

Also, is the June LSAT an effective tool if someone is on many waitlists?
.



Hi Madness 95 and thanks for your inquiry,

Lots of students put down multiple seat deposits for a variety of reasons. 

With regard to the June LSAT, it could be an effective tool, but there would be a lot more information I would like to know before I gave someone the green light on that.  For example, where is your existing score in relation to the schools published numbers?

Amy

Amy
Amy Johnson
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AdmissionsConsultants Inc.
ajohnson@admissionsconsultants.com

UNAS

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Re: Ask AdmissionsConsultants
« Reply #83 on: April 03, 2008, 09:40:23 AM »
Amy:

Your philanthropy does not go unappreciated. I received a couple unexpected rejections and am wondering where you stand/what your experience has been with writing appeal letters?? I know they are a shot in the dark, but is there even a remote chance they will be considered?

Amy Johnson

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Re: Ask AdmissionsConsultants
« Reply #84 on: April 07, 2008, 10:19:22 AM »
Amy:

Your philanthropy does not go unappreciated. I received a couple unexpected rejections and am wondering where you stand/what your experience has been with writing appeal letters?? I know they are a shot in the dark, but is there even a remote chance they will be considered?


Hi UNAS,

I apologize for my delay in getting to these posts recently. 

Most schools will honor a request for a re-evaluation of an application, but usually they will only get to them once all other files have received decisions.  This could take a while . . .

Also, in terms of decision appeals, generally the only ones that I have seen done successfully are those where there is substantive new information:  a new set of grades, a new LSAT score, a remarkable professional accomplishment, etc.

Amy

Amy Johnson
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AdmissionsConsultants Inc.
ajohnson@admissionsconsultants.com

Blondie918

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Re: Ask AdmissionsConsultants
« Reply #85 on: April 07, 2008, 10:29:13 AM »
Amy,

With regards to LOCI, is it ok to send them when you have not heard anything from a school for a substantial amount of time, ie., 6 months?

playingthewaitinggame

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Re: Ask AdmissionsConsultants
« Reply #86 on: April 07, 2008, 02:19:19 PM »
Amy,

Thank you so much for taking the time to answer these questions.  I currently am strongly considering attempting to defer for a year (I am about to graduate from my UG this may) and work for a year before attending law school.  However, I am still in the process of interviewing for a position and likely will not have the issue settled by the time April 15th rolls around for my 1st deposit deadline at the school I would attend (whether it be this fall or next). 

Having said that, I called the admissions office and they said there is no actual deadline for requesting a deferral.  In that case, am I better off just submitting my seat deposit by the April 15th deadline and requesting a deferral later if necessary, or would it be worth while for me to contact the law school and try to get my seat deposit deadline possible pushed back a week or two.  My only concern with not getting a deferral granted before paying the deposit is that I feel like they are less likely to grant it, since my deposit is already paid and I'm pretty much committed.

Any insight you may have would be greatly appreciated.

thank you.

Sergio

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Re: Ask AdmissionsConsultants
« Reply #87 on: April 09, 2008, 07:31:12 PM »
My LSAT score is at the median at one school I am waitlisted at, one point above the median at another, and 2 points above the 75th% at another.  Problem is my GPA was just under 3, and two of the three apps were in late January, hence the waitlists.

Pitt actually told me they do not accept the June LSAT for waitlists, and I will contact other schools as well to find out.

MahlerGrooves

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Re: Ask AdmissionsConsultants
« Reply #88 on: April 09, 2008, 07:42:42 PM »
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Amy Johnson

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Re: Ask AdmissionsConsultants
« Reply #89 on: April 14, 2008, 09:35:41 AM »
Amy,

With regards to LOCI, is it ok to send them when you have not heard anything from a school for a substantial amount of time, ie., 6 months?

Hi Blondie,

Call them first to get a status update on your file.  (6 months is an awfully long time).  Feel free to send me a message or email to let me know what they say and I'll try to give you some specific advice.

Amy

Amy Johnson
Senior Consultant
AdmissionsConsultants Inc.
ajohnson@admissionsconsultants.com