Law School Discussion

Most competetive markets?

Re: Most competetive markets?
« Reply #10 on: February 26, 2008, 06:03:54 AM »
From what i hear: DC>Boston>>>>NYC

Re: Most competetive markets?
« Reply #11 on: February 26, 2008, 06:07:50 AM »
Probably one of the lease competitive markets for Big Law is Houston.  Huge legal market and nobody wants to live there.

Re: Most competetive markets?
« Reply #12 on: February 26, 2008, 06:35:12 AM »
Probably one of the lease competitive markets for Big Law is Houston.  Huge legal market and nobody wants to live there.

Why's that?

Stuje1

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Re: Most competetive markets?
« Reply #13 on: February 26, 2008, 07:19:37 AM »
What are legitimate connections?  Are "a lot of my friends from college moved here, I love the sports, and my aunt and uncle live in the area" legitimate enough if you've never actually lived in the city/state?

Depends on the city.   For NY, pretty much saying "Because it is NY" is good enough.  People there understand it is a very desirable legal market, and you don't need to prove you want to be there/stay there.   For Chicago, I found you need a reason "why Chicago," but it could be minimal.  The fact that I went to a midwestern school for UG and now have friends that live there was enough.  Boston & DC are a little stricter than that.   They want to hear that you have close family there (not your 3rd cousin once removed), you lived there in the past, you got law school in the city, etc.   These cities are more concerned with people leaving the city, and want to make sure you are going to stay (Boston laweyrs-->NYC and DC is very transient).  Besides those cities, I don't have much insight.

Also, it all depends on your grades.  If you are in the top of your class at a good school, they care less and less about your connections.   It becomes more about whether you are really interested in their city, or if it is a back up city.  In other words, they will be more concerned about how many cities you applied for jobs in, how many firms in each city, where you got offers already, etc. and less so on your ties to the area (though to some extent, since this is another factor in determining what city is the applicants true 1st choice)

Stuje1

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Re: Most competetive markets?
« Reply #14 on: February 26, 2008, 07:50:44 AM »
I'm talking about Boston, actually.  I'm from western Connecticut, and I really don't have any desire to live in NYC, but I want to work in a major market close to home.

Looking at where you were accepted, if you go to a school like Michigan or NW, Do relatively well there (slightly above average) and only apply to Boston, you shouldn't have any problems.  Being from the East coast, they will trust you want to come here and understand you went to the midwest because of the great law school.   Just don't apply to Boston, NYC, DC, and LA and not expect them to be concerned about whether you really want to be in Boston.   It is great proof that you want to be in Boston by being able to say "I only applied to firms in Boston"

Quail!

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Re: Most competetive markets?
« Reply #15 on: February 26, 2008, 08:32:22 AM »
DC is definitely the toughest and most competitive.

Sergio

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Re: Most competetive markets?
« Reply #16 on: February 26, 2008, 10:32:22 AM »
On another thread there is the debate of Catholic vs. NYLS - both near the bottom in prestige in their cities.  If NYC is much less competitive than DC, which lots of people are saying, then NYLS would be the better choice.  And most people are agreeing it's Catholic.

NYC is really a love it or hate it place; I don't think there's much middle ground.

Re: Most competetive markets?
« Reply #17 on: February 26, 2008, 12:01:09 PM »
DC is definitely the toughest and most competitive.

You could argue that NYC is definitely the toughest...

Re: Most competetive markets?
« Reply #18 on: February 26, 2008, 01:06:07 PM »
This is all silly.  Obviously the most prestigious firms are in NYC, and it's the hardest to get those firms.  But to just get a good, high-paying job, NYC is one of the easiest.  In that sense, DC is (anecdotally) the hardest, with Boston being difficult as well.

Sergio

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Re: Most competetive markets?
« Reply #19 on: February 26, 2008, 06:18:51 PM »
nike, if that is true, why is there constant talk about how Brooklyn, Cardozo, NYLS, St. John's, etc. are terrible schools not worth going to, while T2 and T3 schools in other places are ok?  There seem to be many grads of these T2 schools having a lot of trouble.