Law School Discussion

Life After T4

Re: Life After T4
« Reply #20 on: January 16, 2008, 10:36:10 PM »
Apparently I didn't struggle since I go to Penn...but I digress...If you were actually in law school, you'd realize life doesn't actually revolve around the contrived necessary/sufficient arguments on the LSAT.

expressio unius est exclusio alterius - you twice mentioned hard word as the key

Dood, you don't realize how much luck, good timing, and reputation/prestige is involved.  Whether you like it or not, hard work is not enough coming from a T4

Because the general consensus is right.  If someone asks you what to expect as a Cooley Grad, you don't respond by saying "my friend Bob is a Cooley grad and he is a partner at Wachtell."


I would say the odds suck big time, and i wouldn't advise it, but if you work your butt off and do extremely well.. top 10%.. and work your butt off after LS, there's a chance you can make it.

Point out where I did say that "hard work is enough"...

Did you struggle in logical reasoning on sufficient/necessary questions?because you've used that type of logic twice, incorrectly.

bloomlaw

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Re: Life After T4
« Reply #21 on: January 16, 2008, 10:36:37 PM »
I'm fairly sure that you could count the number of "inept" Yale grads on a group of interlocking hands.  These are some of the most brilliant and driven students in the nation.

Agreed. But that was not my point. The point was a Cooley grad who is an exceptional practicing lawyer will have a much better career than an inept (insert t14) lawyer, although the inept (insert t14) lawyer will have a much nicer job coming out of college, all other things being equal.

Re: Life After T4
« Reply #22 on: January 16, 2008, 10:38:46 PM »
Yet again brilliant doesn't cut it, nor is it even that important.  Have you ever looked at John Edward's litigation career?  We are talking about some ridiculous luck and timing to get him to the point where he could make big money.

I'm fairly sure that you could count the number of "inept" Yale grads on a group of interlocking hands.  These are some of the most brilliant and driven students in the nation.

Agreed. But that was not my point. The point was a Cooley grad who is an exceptional practicing lawyer will have a much better career than an inept (insert t14) lawyer, although the inept (insert t14) lawyer will have a much nicer job coming out of college, all other things being equal.

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Re: Life After T4
« Reply #23 on: January 16, 2008, 10:39:48 PM »
Apparently I didn't struggle since I go to Penn...but I digress...If you were actually in law school, you'd realize life doesn't actually revolve around the contrived necessary/sufficient arguments on the LSAT.

expressio unius est exclusio alterius - you twice mentioned hard word as the key

Dood, you don't realize how much luck, good timing, and reputation/prestige is involved.  Whether you like it or not, hard work is not enough coming from a T4

Because the general consensus is right.  If someone asks you what to expect as a Cooley Grad, you don't respond by saying "my friend Bob is a Cooley grad and he is a partner at Wachtell."


I would say the odds suck big time, and i wouldn't advise it, but if you work your butt off and do extremely well.. top 10%.. and work your butt off after LS, there's a chance you can make it.

Point out where I did say that "hard work is enough"...

Did you struggle in logical reasoning on sufficient/necessary questions?because you've used that type of logic twice, incorrectly.

I said all that about hard work, and, in my final clause, I used the word "can", which takes away the direct causal connection. An alternate meaning of the word "can" is in the phrase "can you read closer, please?"

Wallace, my example of a future "inept (inser t14) grad"

Re: Life After T4
« Reply #24 on: January 16, 2008, 10:41:23 PM »
Dood, stop trying to lecture me on formal logic.  Expression and interpretation is how the world, including the legal profession works. 

Apparently I didn't struggle since I go to Penn...but I digress...If you were actually in law school, you'd realize life doesn't actually revolve around the contrived necessary/sufficient arguments on the LSAT.

expressio unius est exclusio alterius - you twice mentioned hard word as the key

Dood, you don't realize how much luck, good timing, and reputation/prestige is involved.  Whether you like it or not, hard work is not enough coming from a T4

Because the general consensus is right.  If someone asks you what to expect as a Cooley Grad, you don't respond by saying "my friend Bob is a Cooley grad and he is a partner at Wachtell."


I would say the odds suck big time, and i wouldn't advise it, but if you work your butt off and do extremely well.. top 10%.. and work your butt off after LS, there's a chance you can make it.

Point out where I did say that "hard work is enough"...

Did you struggle in logical reasoning on sufficient/necessary questions?because you've used that type of logic twice, incorrectly.

I said all that about hard work, and, in my final clause, I used the word "can", which takes away the direct causal connection. An alternate meaning of the word "can" is in the phrase "can you read closer, please?"

Wallace, my example of a future "inept (inser t14) grad"

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Re: Life After T4
« Reply #25 on: January 16, 2008, 10:44:11 PM »
Yet again brilliant doesn't cut it, nor is it even that important.  Have you ever looked at John Edward's litigation career?  We are talking about some ridiculous luck and timing to get him to the point where he could make big money.

I'm fairly sure that you could count the number of "inept" Yale grads on a group of interlocking hands.  These are some of the most brilliant and driven students in the nation.

Agreed. But that was not my point. The point was a Cooley grad who is an exceptional practicing lawyer will have a much better career than an inept (insert t14) lawyer, although the inept (insert t14) lawyer will have a much nicer job coming out of college, all other things being equal.

i don't see what having big money has to do with a successful career.. i guess that really means we have different assumptions about what a successful career is.

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Re: Life After T4
« Reply #26 on: January 16, 2008, 10:47:44 PM »
Dood, stop trying to lecture me on formal logic.  Expression and interpretation is how the world, including the legal profession works. 


Dood, you used formal logic to criticize my original statement with your W reference, which I found annoying. But your criticisms of my arguments haven't been real criticisms because you jumped to conclusions and generalizations that I didn't state. Nice INTERPRETATION. And thanks for the tip about how the world works. I'll keep that in mind.

Re: Life After T4
« Reply #27 on: January 16, 2008, 10:50:43 PM »
No good link..but a quick summary...
His first case that he was assigned was an unwinnable case done as a favor for a friend of the firm.  The case was unwinnable, but he won almost 4 Million in a decision no sane judge would ever find.
Second major case - awarded 6.5 Million, judge ruled there was insufficient evidence for the verdict.  Unbelievably, the judges ruling was reversed on appeal, but less money was given.
The big case he won for $25 Million with the girl and the pool drain...his son died right before the closing arguments and he refrenced his son while speaking to the jury multiple times.  Largest award in history of NC, and almost everyone agrees it was jury sympathy for Edward's son, not the injured party.

Edit: Final big case he won was also so poorly decided that the legislature passed a law directly after preventing recovery for the same type of situation.

He isn't even that great of a trial lawyer.  If he had any other judge in that first case he would have never gotten a chance for a second case.  If that second case was properly decided, he wouldn't have been approached about the third case.  If his son hadn't died (which is not lucky, but a timing issue), that third case would have come out differently.  Without some amazing luck and timing, Edwards would still probably be at that small firm in NC where he was for the first case and not in politics and rich.
Eh.  I'm going to have to side with Amy. 

Can you find me a good link to his litigation career?  Where/when was he lucky? 

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Re: Life After T4
« Reply #28 on: January 17, 2008, 02:30:08 AM »
But I can't agree with that.  Brilliance isn't brilliance if it's not developed and recognized.  Would Posner be such a luminary if no one would have looked at his resume?

That's the problem with your argument.  T4 is a handicap; you must play against it.

Just stop. You're wrong.

Re: Life After T4
« Reply #29 on: January 17, 2008, 07:04:17 PM »
Thanks Everyone