Law School Discussion

Mac laptop or PC for law school?

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Re: Mac laptop or PC for law school?
« Reply #10 on: January 16, 2008, 11:18:43 PM »
I heard Macs do not get viruses though, and that they do not slow down as much when you add programs on to them??? Why I mention this is I can imagine getting a virus right in the middle of law school and losing all my stuff. My Toshiba laptop (which has for the most part been great) recently got a virus that corrupted the anti virus program and then nearly made everything stop working. I had it professionally removed, but if something like that happened during finals, it would have been a disaster...knowing that nothing like that could happen with a Mac would make me want to buy one as long as it is compatible with law school.

Don't ask for advice and then argue with it - it's ill-mannered. If you're really concerned about the corruptibility of PCs, learn how to build your own computer or at least reformat your hard drive so that if you are again compromised you can fix it yourself. No big whoop.

Building a computer, you're kidding right? I also do not know how to reformat a computer, but my guess is that is not something that I want to be doing in the middle of exams???
As for "ill-mannerer"...dude this is a discussion board. If you can't challenge the advice you are given or add perspective then what is the point?

Re: Mac laptop or PC for law school?
« Reply #11 on: January 17, 2008, 06:24:00 PM »
I heard Macs do not get viruses though, and that they do not slow down as much when you add programs on to them??? Why I mention this is I can imagine getting a virus right in the middle of law school and losing all my stuff. My Toshiba laptop (which has for the most part been great) recently got a virus that corrupted the anti virus program and then nearly made everything stop working. I had it professionally removed, but if something like that happened during finals, it would have been a disaster...knowing that nothing like that could happen with a Mac would make me want to buy one as long as it is compatible with law school.

Don't ask for advice and then argue with it - it's ill-mannered. If you're really concerned about the corruptibility of PCs, learn how to build your own computer or at least reformat your hard drive so that if you are again compromised you can fix it yourself. No big whoop.

Building a computer, you're kidding right? I also do not know how to reformat a computer, but my guess is that is not something that I want to be doing in the middle of exams???
As for "ill-mannerer"...dude this is a discussion board. If you can't challenge the advice you are given or add perspective then what is the point?

ditto.

Majmun

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Re: Mac laptop or PC for law school?
« Reply #12 on: January 18, 2008, 06:47:26 AM »
]

Building a computer, you're kidding right? I also do not know how to reformat a computer,

I could teach a relatively unintelligent chimp to reformat a computer in a few minutes.  I could teach the same chimp how to build a PC in a few hours.

These things sound difficult but they're not.

I'm a mac guy for the most part ( I have 3) but  I will say they've gone down hill in recent years, but are still better than most PCs.

Re: Mac laptop or PC for law school?
« Reply #13 on: January 18, 2008, 07:11:02 AM »
I will definitely be getting the Lenovo X61s.  It's small, has amazing battery life, and is pretty durable. 

TallisUmbras

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Re: Mac laptop or PC for law school?
« Reply #14 on: January 18, 2008, 10:08:21 AM »
You're biggest concern when choosing your computer should be test taking. Worrying about getting a virus is one thing, but you have to have a system that is compatible with whatever software your particular school is using. Simply put, you can operate a Windows environment while using an Apple product. You can do this for test taking. Many people do and experience no problem. However, if you are worried about what you might consider complicated "tech" stuff such as operating two environments, partitions, etc. then I would say just go with a PC.

PCs are attacked for more reasons than just market share. However, you can take steps to mitigate your exposure to those viruses. Common sense things like not opening email attachments from people you don't trust, avoiding problem websites (song lyrics, porn...you know, the regulars) and having a good anti-virus (your school almost certainly will allow you to get one for free). Beyond that, you should also get back-up, freeware, applications for your anti-virus such as Adaware and Spybot. I also use a back-up firewall that can be downloaded for free. Only download freeware from websites you trust. I go to download.com, which is operate by C-Net.