Law School Discussion

Here we go

Here we go
« on: October 20, 2007, 03:14:11 AM »
I have a 3.58 LSDAS GPA (downgraded from a 3.60) and a 173 LSAT; very average soft factors.  I wish to stay in the Midwest if at all possible.  University of Chicago is my dream school.

Other schools on my list include:

University of Michigan
Northwestern University
Duke (maaaybe)
Cornell (again, maybe)
University of Pennsylvania
Vanderbilt
Washington University in St. Louis (I'm from St. Louis)
University of Minnesota
University of Illinois
University of Missouri-Columbia (safety)

Is this a decent list of schools to apply to given that I don't want to go to the coasts?  How likely am I to get in to Chicago or Michigan?  Should I really include more T14 schools even though I hate their location?  Should I apply to Harvard just for shits and giggles?  I am not sure how thrilled I am about the prospect of Biglaw.  A nice scholarship at a top 25 school with a good LRAP followed by public interest work sounds great to me.

Re: Here we go
« Reply #1 on: October 20, 2007, 08:58:42 PM »
Good point about the scholarship negotiation factor.  Hadn't considered that.  I'm probably going to trim out some of the T20 schools and add a couple T14.

Re: Here we go
« Reply #2 on: October 21, 2007, 12:41:28 AM »
Thanks much for the information. I have a couple more questions.

Would it be a good idea for me to do ED at Chicago?  I am leaning towards no, since even though I very much wish to attend there, I feel I could still be swayed to another school with a more generous scholarship offer.  I'd like to minimize debt incurred.  Also, it seems to me that if you do ED, you obviously will not have that scholarship negotiation leverage you mentioned earlier.  Am I missing something here?  Besides the fact that my admission is more likely with ED (I think?).

Any opinion on Chicago's version of LRAP (the HPIP)?  One of the motivating factors for my interest in Michigan is their excellent LRAP.  This HPIP seems a bit different, and I am not really certain whether it is better or worse than Michigan's more traditional LRAP.