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jarhead

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Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
« Reply #1750 on: August 15, 2007, 05:40:30 PM »
plus he lugs his own gear making the whole survival thing that much harder, on those other shows the cameras are usually already set up....one more clue to fakeness

Denny Crane

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Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
« Reply #1751 on: August 15, 2007, 05:41:45 PM »
plus he lugs his own gear making the whole survival thing that much harder, on those other shows the cameras are usually already set up....one more clue to fakeness

The set up cameras I can forgive for BG since I always figured that he just waited for the cameramen to go ahead of him and set up the shot. 

Kirk Lazarus

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Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
« Reply #1752 on: August 15, 2007, 07:59:19 PM »
the key here is just to have enough merit to make it past summary judgment. If it does that, settlement cause the defendants aren't going to want a trial and have all that negative publicity. Will it get past SJ?  I have no clue. From what I know - probably not because 1) the statements may not rise to the specificity needed and 2) I don't see how there is any specific damage to the plantiff. Reputation? Everyone was disgusted at the comments, it was universally agreed that the statements were at the least an exaggeration of fact. Emtional damage? weak.





I'm fairly certain you don't have to prove some sort of IIED or actual damage in order to have an action for defamation, merely exposure to scorn, hatred, or ridicule, essentially just damage to your reputation alone is sufficient.

As for specificity, if there's no way to interpret it where he's not talking about her, and it's not a really a matter of opinion but a statement of purported fact (unlike Denny's Southerners example), than it's likely sufficiently specific for a cause of action.



I disagree with all of this. In fact, I'm fairly certain its incorrect (although damage to reputation would be a recognizable injury), but I don't feel like going back into torts. I'll say this: Remember, you have to have some sort of injury for you to be compensated. That's all of torts.  Even in a strict liability regime, if there is no injury, nominal damages will be awarded (unless of course punitive damages are at issue). So elements of each claim aside, torts is really about injury.

Even noting that, I think injury is an essential element in the claim  (ie, emotional distress, loss of reputation, pecuniary loss, etc).

The specificity distinction you make is unpersuasive and I'm almost certain that it isn't the legal standard. I'll double check.



A.

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Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
« Reply #1753 on: August 16, 2007, 04:41:57 AM »
I Wish I Lived in a Land of Lipton …
What makes Southern sweet tea so special?
By Jeffrey Klineman
Posted Wednesday, Aug. 8, 2007, at 1:06 PM ET

"It's rough. It's been rough on that food. It's different eating here than it is at the house. Ain't got no sweet tea, and ain't got no fried chicken."
—Boo Weekley, PGA golfer from Milton, Fla., interviewed by the BBC on Day 2 of the British Open, 7/20/2007

You can't blame Boo Weekley for not knowing—before last month, the man had never left North America. And there are some fairly major associations between Great Britain and tea. But poor Weekley had the same awful realization most of us have when we leave Dixie: When you order sweet tea, you probably aren't going to get it. And even if you're lucky enough to find something bearing its name, it's probably not quite the same.

Drinking sweet tea is one of the oldest and most exceptional Southern traditions. As Dolly Parton's character in Steel Magnolias puts it, it's the "house wine of the South"—a clear, orange-to-red tinted tea brewed from six or seven Lipton or Luzianne tea bags, poured hot onto a cup or more of sugar or a pool of simple syrup, and then diluted into a gallon pitcher in the fridge. It's served over a mound of ice in a huge glass—so cold that you can watch your napkin drown in a puddle of condensation.

By "sweet tea," we mean "sweet." As one food technologist told me, some of the sweetest glasses can hit 22 Brix of sugar. That means that 22 percent of the liquid consists of dissolved sugar solids, or, to put it in more meaningful terms: close to twice what you'd find in a can of Coke. Still, there's a balance to the flavor—the tea is brewed long and strong, so it gets an astringency that can only be countered by lots of the sweet stuff.

Southerners, of course, have a taste for sugar that is demonstrably stronger than what you find up North. We like our pecan pie and pralines sweet enough to make the dentist cringe. All of the major soda companies—the Coca-Cola Co., PepsiCo, Dr Pepper—started in the South. Bourbon, that sweetest of whiskies, is from Kentucky. A mint julep, that classic Southern cocktail, is basically a whiskey'd up sweet tea, with mint, ice, simple syrup, and booze.

One chef I spoke with—Scott Peacock, who spent eight years bunking and writing with the Grand Dame of Southern cooking, the late Edna Lewis—suggested that Dixie's taste for sweet may have evolved from the use of sugar as a preservative. Peacock's dad grew up in a small Alabama town where they didn't have much refined sugar. In towns like that, he said, they grew cane, milled it, and put it in jars. People anticipated the crystallization of the cane sugar with great excitement, eager to stir it into their tea.

Sugar worship might account for much of sweet tea's popularity, but I think its appeal lies in the ice. Southerners seem to have a particular fascination with ice. This may stem, most obviously, from the fact that the Southern climate is often steamier than a Rat Pack schvitz. In an early essay about Southern cuisine published by the American Philosophical Society called Hog Meat and Cornpone: Food Habits in the Ante-Bellum South, Sam Hilliard wrote that a container of cool—not even cold—water, pulled from a nearby spring, was a delicacy at the table. Tea was mostly a drink for the upper class, and early on, it was the rich who had access to the ice that came down on ships or in wagons, at least until icehouses were built in cities (Southern farmers had to wait for the arrival of the Model T). If ice was a luxury, then putting out a pitcher of ice-cold tea must have been quite a bit of hospitality. One historian, Joe Gray Taylor, wrote in Eating, Drinking, and Visiting in the South: An Informal History that the rural electrification—and, consequently, refrigeration—wrought by the Tennessee Valley Authority in the 1930s was "probably more appreciated for the ice cubes it provided … than for any of its other services."

Offering up a glass of sweet tea on a hot day in the South is as welcoming a gesture as passing the doobie at a Phish show. It's so ingrained in the Southern DNA—Marion Cabell Tyree included the recipe in a cookbook called Housekeeping in Old Virginia as early as 1879—that people now post videos online of their infants sampling the stuff. It's a frequent menu item for the condemned, as well as a centerpiece at church suppers. As an April Fools' Day prank in 2003, Georgia State Rep. John Noel introduced a bill that would have made it a misdemeanor for a restaurant owner not to include sweet tea on the menu. Most Southerners can easily tell the difference between fresh sweet tea and the stuff from concentrate—and unless their sugar jones is too strong that day, chances are they'll send the latter back.

It's a refreshing combination of sweet and cold, sure, but how does something that's simply tasty become the unofficial beverage for an entire region? Well, there's this: The South reveres its traditions, and sweet tea is one of them. Dixie has had some embarrassments in its time: There's that whole Civil War thing, the whole Judge Roy Moore thing, that whole Naples, Fla., Swamp Buggy Queen thing, to name a few. Getting your nose rubbed in your own traditions too many times makes you cling to those that aren't, well, illegal. And you revere them as much because they have proven resistant to change as you do for their particular qualities.

For me, personally—and I suspect I'm not alone—sweet tea is a primal link to my own Southern past. I grew up a Jewish kid in Atlanta, with a mom from Brooklyn, N.Y., and a dad from Cleveland. To assimilate with my classmates, I quickly learned to say y'all, talk about Herschel Walker, put honey on my biscuits, and enjoy sweet tea. While my parents made us drink an unsweetened mint tea blend at home, I strong-armed them into stopping by Po Folks on the way home from baseball practice. A middling Southern-style chain (we didn't know enough to eat at Mary Mac's), known for horrible phonetic misspellings, heavily larded chicken, and, most importantly, sweet tea served in Mason Jars, it was practically the only place I could get hooked up properly—at least, that is, until I began raiding the always-full homemade pitchers in my friends' refrigerators.

I may live in Massachusetts now, but I still consider myself Southern at heart. In the fall, I ask the bartender to let me watch the Bulldogs game. In the spring, I feel a potentially suicidal need to stop wearing a coat. And in the summer, I still look for sweet tea. Even on the rare occasion I can find someplace that has it on the menu, it's often slightly off. Maybe it isn't sweet enough. Maybe it's the lack of free refills. Whatever it is, it chills me.

http://www.slate.com/id/2171917

One Step Ahead

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Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
« Reply #1754 on: August 16, 2007, 05:13:30 AM »
I Wish I Lived in a Land of Lipton …
What makes Southern sweet tea so special?
By Jeffrey Klineman
Posted Wednesday, Aug. 8, 2007, at 1:06 PM ET

"It's rough. It's been rough on that food. It's different eating here than it is at the house. Ain't got no sweet tea, and ain't got no fried chicken."
—Boo Weekley, PGA golfer from Milton, Fla., interviewed by the BBC on Day 2 of the British Open, 7/20/2007


He should have gone to the immigrant neighborhoods

Southerners, of course, have a taste for sugar that is demonstrably stronger than what you find up North. We like our pecan pie and pralines sweet enough to make the dentist cringe. All of the major soda companies—the Coca-Cola Co., PepsiCo, Dr Pepper—started in the South. Bourbon, that sweetest of whiskies, is from Kentucky.

One Step Ahead

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Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
« Reply #1755 on: August 16, 2007, 05:14:49 AM »
Major League Umps Call More Strikes for Pitchers of Same Race LiveScience Staff

LiveScience.com
Tue Aug 14, 11:55 AM ET

Major League Baseball umpires are more likely to call strikes for pitchers of the same race or ethnicity, a new study finds.


Researchers at the University of Texas at Austin analyzed every pitch from the 2004 through 2006 major league seasons to explore whether racial discrimination factored into umpires’ decisions to call a pitch a strike or a ball.


Just as discrimination in the labor market can affect disparities in wages, promotion and performance evaluation, the researchers said, possible discrimination by umpires could affect the outcome of games and careers.


During a typical baseball game, umpires call about 75 pitches for each team (they call about 400,000 pitches over the whole season—this figure excludes foul balls), so an umpire’s evaluation heavily influences pitcher productivity and performance.


“Umpires judge the performance of players every game, deciding whether pitches are strikes or balls,” said study leader Daniel Hamermesh, who will present his findings next month at his campus and later at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. “Discrimination affects the outcome of a game and the labor market, determining the pitcher’s market value and compensation.”


The researchers found if a pitcher is of the same race or ethnicity as the home plate umpire, more strikes are called and his team’s chance of winning is improved.


The power to evaluate players’ performances disproportionately belonged chiefly to white umpires, while negative calls particularly impacted minority pitchers, Hamermesh said.


But, this behavior diminishes when the umpire's calls are more closely scrutinized—for example at ballparks with electronic monitoring systems, in full count situation where there are 3 balls or 2 strikes, or at well-attended games.


Hamermesh said the study is drawing more comments, so far, from his colleagues than any of his previous work. "I did not know how many economists are hung up on baseball," he told LiveScience.
http://news.yahoo.com/s/livescience/20070814/sc_livescience/majorleagueumpscallmorestrikesforpitchersofsamerace

A.

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Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
« Reply #1756 on: August 16, 2007, 05:42:12 AM »
I Wish I Lived in a Land of Lipton …
What makes Southern sweet tea so special?
By Jeffrey Klineman
Posted Wednesday, Aug. 8, 2007, at 1:06 PM ET

"It's rough. It's been rough on that food. It's different eating here than it is at the house. Ain't got no sweet tea, and ain't got no fried chicken."
—Boo Weekley, PGA golfer from Milton, Fla., interviewed by the BBC on Day 2 of the British Open, 7/20/2007


He should have gone to the immigrant neighborhoods

Southerners, of course, have a taste for sugar that is demonstrably stronger than what you find up North. We like our pecan pie and pralines sweet enough to make the dentist cringe. All of the major soda companies—the Coca-Cola Co., PepsiCo, Dr Pepper—started in the South. Bourbon, that sweetest of whiskies, is from Kentucky.


Yeah KY is a border state.  They have southern tendencies that can be included sometimes.

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Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
« Reply #1757 on: August 16, 2007, 05:43:16 AM »
I Wish I Lived in a Land of Lipton …
What makes Southern sweet tea so special?
By Jeffrey Klineman
Posted Wednesday, Aug. 8, 2007, at 1:06 PM ET

"It's rough. It's been rough on that food. It's different eating here than it is at the house. Ain't got no sweet tea, and ain't got no fried chicken."
—Boo Weekley, PGA golfer from Milton, Fla., interviewed by the BBC on Day 2 of the British Open, 7/20/2007


He should have gone to the immigrant neighborhoods

Southerners, of course, have a taste for sugar that is demonstrably stronger than what you find up North. We like our pecan pie and pralines sweet enough to make the dentist cringe. All of the major soda companies—the Coca-Cola Co., PepsiCo, Dr Pepper—started in the South. Bourbon, that sweetest of whiskies, is from Kentucky.


Yeah KY is a border state.  They have southern tendencies that can be included sometimes.

they are straight south.

A.

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Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
« Reply #1758 on: August 16, 2007, 05:45:30 AM »
Southern KY is.  Northern and eastern KY is more appalachian, which is completely different.

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Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
« Reply #1759 on: August 16, 2007, 05:47:59 AM »
Southern KY is.  Northern and eastern KY is more appalachian, which is completely different.

eastern I'll give you.  northern is south.