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A.

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Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
« Reply #1690 on: August 13, 2007, 08:59:31 PM »
What are the benefits of increased life expectancy besides an overburdened old-age-welfare system?

More billed hours.

Estate planning!  Good thinking, Denny.

7S

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Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
« Reply #1691 on: August 13, 2007, 09:16:36 PM »
What are the benefits of increased life expectancy besides an overburdened old-age-welfare system?

increased profits for pharmaceutical companies?

A.

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Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
« Reply #1692 on: August 13, 2007, 09:25:29 PM »
Not gonna benefit me unless juries award higher verdicts because of it.  See, increased average life expectancy just means more taxes and more slow drivers!

Denny Crane

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Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
« Reply #1693 on: August 13, 2007, 09:29:08 PM »
Not gonna benefit me unless juries award higher verdicts because of it.  See, increased average life expectancy just means more taxes and more slow drivers!

Retirement ages and the age at which social security entitlements are disbursed increase depending on date of birth, so presumably the proportion of people who are elderly will remain fairly constant. 

Though yes, the number of slower drivers will increase dramatically.

A.

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« Reply #1694 on: August 14, 2007, 04:29:39 AM »
Retirement ages and the age at which social security entitlements are disbursed increase depending on date of birth, so presumably the proportion of people who are elderly will remain fairly constant. 

Just b/c people are living longer doesn't mean they're also functional/productive longer.

Kirk Lazarus

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Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
« Reply #1695 on: August 14, 2007, 05:52:42 AM »
Retirement ages and the age at which social security entitlements are disbursed increase depending on date of birth, so presumably the proportion of people who are elderly will remain fairly constant. 

Just b/c people are living longer doesn't mean they're also functional/productive longer.

Generally as a trend in the United States, that's exactly what it means.

Denny Crane

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« Reply #1696 on: August 14, 2007, 05:54:32 AM »
Retirement ages and the age at which social security entitlements are disbursed increase depending on date of birth, so presumably the proportion of people who are elderly will remain fairly constant. 

Just b/c people are living longer doesn't mean they're also functional/productive longer.

They're still functional and productive enough.  Maybe not for jobs that require heavy lifting, but certainly for management positions and other professional positions (like being a lawyer). 

A.

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« Reply #1697 on: August 14, 2007, 06:15:53 AM »
Maybe into their 80s, yes.  But centenarians aren't going to be doing too much of anything.

2Lacoste

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Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
« Reply #1698 on: August 14, 2007, 06:18:10 AM »
Holla at the Hispanic Truman Scholars doing big things:

Ford Foundation Selects Its New Leader From Outside the Philanthropic World

By STEPHANIE STROM
Published: August 14, 2007

The Ford Foundation has selected a dark-horse candidate with little experience in institutional philanthropy as its new president.

Luis A. Ubiñas, who has worked for McKinsey & Company, the consulting firm, for 18 years, will lead the organization, the nation’s second-largest foundation, with $11 billion in assets.

Mr. Ubiñas’s appointment, to be announced today, is expected to stun the nonprofit world, which has been speculating about who in the field would succeed Susan V. Berresford, Ford’s influential leader for more than a decade, when she retires in January.

Increasingly, however, high-profile nonprofit jobs are going to people who have done well in the business world or in politics, a reflection on the pressure on charities and foundations to become more accountable.

Kathryn S. Fuller, chairwoman of Ford’s board, said the trustees deliberately did not specify the type of experience they were seeking for the job.

“Where we started and ended,” Ms. Fuller said, “was first and foremost with values of the institution, which are a bedrock commitment to social justice and innovation and to helping those whose voices are not heard for any number of reasons, whether economic or because of discrimination.”

Steve Gunderson, president of the Council on Foundations, said of Mr. Ubiñas: “Look at his experience helping traditional media companies respond to the new tools of the economy. Nobody faces more changes than philanthropy because we’re in the middle of dramatic growth that has created new scrutiny.”

Mr. Ubiñas, 44, grew up in the South Bronx and attended private schools in Manhattan on scholarship before going to Harvard and, later, its business school, using a combination of scholarships and loans. “Access to educational opportunities changed my life,” he said. “I wouldn’t be here talking to you had it not been for the work done by foundations in the 1960s and 1970s to increase equal access to education.”

He has also worked with nonprofit groups, including Leadership Education and Development, which provides educational opportunities to minority students, and the United Way of the Bay Area in San Francisco, where he lives. He plans to move to New York, where the foundation is based, with his wife and two children.

“For as long as I’ve been working, I’ve been working in parallel in the for-profit and nonprofit arenas in preparation for this moment,” Mr. Ubiñas said.

Michael P. Danziger, executive director of the Steppingstone Foundation, has known Mr. Ubiñas since they were students at the Collegiate School in Manhattan.

“In ninth grade, Luis showed up,” Mr. Danziger said. “He was different from the traditional Collegiate student because he was from the Bronx and circumstances far less fortunate than most of us, but he struck me as somebody who was so comfortable with who he was that he was able to bridge the two worlds he traveled between each day with seeming ease.”

Mr. Ubiñas helped Mr. Danziger start Steppingstone, a Boston charity that helps urban children get an education to prepare them for college, and he served on its board for seven years.

To the public, Ford is a symbol of traditional foundations, but its critics in the nonprofit world see it as bureaucratic and inefficient — it has more than 500 employees and its median grant is small by contemporary standards.

Still, Mr. Ubiñas said he had no plans to overhaul Ford radically. “Change for change’s sake is never good,” he said. “For me, it’s about innovation, and innovation has defined Ford for a long time.”

Ford Foundation grants helped start the Grameen Bank, a microlending organization, as well as organizations like the Local Initiatives Support Coalition, a community development group.

Under Ms. Berresford, the foundation committed $355 million to help foreign students pursue graduate-level studies in an effort to stem the “brain drain” in developing countries and used a $52 million grant to generate $4 billion in housing loans for almost 50,000 low-income families. Most recently, she helped create a nonprofit to support artists.

“The core challenge will be ensuring continuity,” Mr. Ubiñas said, “ensuring that I further the excellent history of the Ford Foundation and the phenomenal work it has done over the last 70 years.”

A.

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« Reply #1699 on: August 14, 2007, 06:50:00 AM »
The Myth, the Math, the Sex
By GINA KOLATA

EVERYONE knows men are promiscuous by nature. It’s part of the genetic strategy that evolved to help men spread their genes far and wide. The strategy is different for a woman, who has to go through so much just to have a baby and then nurture it. She is genetically programmed to want just one man who will stick with her and help raise their children.

Surveys bear this out. In study after study and in country after country, men report more, often many more, sexual partners than women.

One survey, recently reported by the federal government, concluded that men had a median of seven female sex partners. Women had a median of four male sex partners. Another study, by British researchers, stated that men had 12.7 heterosexual partners in their lifetimes and women had 6.5.

But there is just one problem, mathematicians say. It is logically impossible for heterosexual men to have more partners on average than heterosexual women. Those survey results cannot be correct.

It is about time for mathematicians to set the record straight, said David Gale, an emeritus professor of mathematics at the University of California, Berkeley.

“Surveys and studies to the contrary notwithstanding, the conclusion that men have substantially more sex partners than women is not and cannot be true for purely logical reasons,” Dr. Gale said.

He even provided a proof, writing in an e-mail message:

“By way of dramatization, we change the context slightly and will prove what will be called the High School Prom Theorem. We suppose that on the day after the prom, each girl is asked to give the number of boys she danced with. These numbers are then added up giving a number G. The same information is then obtained from the boys, giving a number B.

Theorem: G=B

Proof: Both G and B are equal to C, the number of couples who danced together at the prom. Q.E.D.”

Sex survey researchers say they know that Dr. Gale is correct. Men and women in a population must have roughly equal numbers of partners. So, when men report many more than women, what is going on and what is to be believed?

“I have heard this question before,” said Cheryl D. Fryar, a health statistician at the National Center for Health Statistics and a lead author of the new federal report, “Drug Use and Sexual Behaviors Reported by Adults: United States, 1999-2002,” which found that men had a median of seven partners and women four.

But when it comes to an explanation, she added, “I have no idea.”

“This is what is reported,” Ms. Fryar said. “The reason why they report it I do not know.”

Sevgi O. Aral, who is associate director for science in the division of sexually transmitted disease prevention at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said there are several possible explanations and all are probably operating.

One is that men are going outside the population to find partners, to prostitutes, for example, who are not part of the survey, or are having sex when they travel to other countries.

Another, of course, is that men exaggerate the number of partners they have and women underestimate.

Dr. Aral said she cannot determine what the true number of sex partners is for men and women, but, she added, “I would say that men have more partners on average but the difference is not as big as it seems in the numbers we are looking at.”

Dr. Gale is still troubled. He said invoking women who are outside the survey population cannot begin to explain a difference of 75 percent in the number of partners, as occurred in the study saying men had seven partners and women four. Something like a prostitute effect, he said, “would be negligible.” The most likely explanation, by far, is that the numbers cannot be trusted.

Ronald Graham, a professor of mathematics and computer science at the University of California, San Diego, agreed with Dr. Gale. After all, on average, men would have to have three more partners than women, raising the question of where all those extra partners might be.

“Some might be imaginary,” Dr. Graham said. “Maybe two are in the man’s mind and one really exists.”

Dr. Gale added that he is not just being querulous when he raises the question of logical impossibility. The problem, he said, is that when such data are published, with no asterisk next to them saying they can’t be true, they just “reinforce the stereotypes of promiscuous males and chaste females.”

In fact, he added, the survey data themselves may be part of the problem. If asked, a man, believing that he should have a lot of partners, may feel compelled to exaggerate, and a woman, believing that she should have few partners, may minimize her past.

“In this way,” Dr. Gale said, “the false conclusions people draw from these surveys may have a sort of self-fulfilling prophecy.”


http://www.nytimes.com/2007/08/12/weekinreview/12kolata.html?em&ex=1187236800&en=8abc47d753bc3834&ei=5087%0A