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Identity Theft and Law School Applications: I am a Victim

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Re: Identity Theft and Law School Applications: I am a Victim
« Reply #40 on: June 18, 2005, 07:44:00 AM »
Posted by: anoddduck
The cheapest way I know of to get long-term credit monitoring is through Myfico.com.

I signed up for their "Score Watch" program, where they send you an email every time your score goes down below a certain amount (that you set), your cards have a balance increase of an amount that you set, and cards you haven't used in X months suddenly have activity...

Posted by: dave303
It's free, its the fraud alert that was mentioned earlier in this thread.

http://www.fightidentitytheft.com/flag.html


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Thanks for the advice, I am currently taking these steps as we speak. Now the last thing that I have to figure out is if it is possible to file a police report for a crime that occurred out of my state. Does this mean a long road trip to Ohio? I hope not, because that is not possible.

SleepyGuyYawn

Re: Identity Theft and Law School Applications: I am a Victim
« Reply #41 on: June 18, 2005, 10:48:52 PM »
Oh come on.  The sky hasn't fallen.  You weren't screwed -- at least not yet.  And the chances that you'll have an issue with somebody doing something with your SSN is extremely slim

I would surely not ever submit applications missing your social security number.  The chances that somebody is going to misplace a part of your application because of it outweigh any increased risk that somebody might get your SSN.

Do you realize that the clerks at Wal Mart or gas stations can easily get your Debit/Credit card info when you use it?  I used to work at a restaurant and it struck me as quite amazing that I had access to literally thousands of credit card numbers of customers -- the same thing when I worked at a hotel once. Now if you're going to get all paranoid, I would get paranoid from that, not from losing your SSN.

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Re: Identity Theft and Law School Applications: I am a Victim
« Reply #42 on: June 19, 2005, 12:51:41 AM »
Oh come on.  The sky hasn't fallen.  You weren't screwed -- at least not yet.  And the chances that you'll have an issue with somebody doing something with your SSN is extremely slim

I would surely not ever submit applications missing your social security number.  The chances that somebody is going to misplace a part of your application because of it outweigh any increased risk that somebody might get your SSN.

Do you realize that the clerks at Wal Mart or gas stations can easily get your Debit/Credit card info when you use it?  I used to work at a restaurant and it struck me as quite amazing that I had access to literally thousands of credit card numbers of customers -- the same thing when I worked at a hotel once. Now if you're going to get all paranoid, I would get paranoid from that, not from losing your SSN.

Look, you are the one crying about the sky falling. According to you, we are not safe anywhere. Our information will get stolen at a Walmart, A gas station, and a restaurant. Our credit is even being stolen as we speak by some shady Internet hacker who can retrieve our life story in a matter of 15 minutes. So we just might as well live our lives in fear and stay home 24/7.

I don't subscribe to that line of thinking. I don't subscribe to this belief that since there is a good chance that credit theft could happen, it will happen. Instead, I like to take precautions to protect myself. And when the organizations responsible for taking care of our information fail, we have to hold them accountable. Because while I was protecting myself, they let their guard down. Now, I have a greater chance of becoming a victim of credit fraud due to their negligence.

And yes, I don't think that people should use their Social security numbers on their applications. Many schools have recognized the security threat and they are now asking for our LSAC ID numbers instead of SSN. I don't see anything wrong with taking this precaution.

And you say that the chances of somebody using our SSN is very slim? You must be speaking out of your ass because there is not any data to support your claim. Thieves steal identity records in order to sell these records or to commit identity theft, period. In other words, this security breach has increased my chances of becoming a victim of credit fraud.

I believe in taking action and protecting myself. I do not believe in rolling over and playing dead because of a fear that because the probability of credit theft is high, it is going to happen. No, that is a fallacy. So you can keep you paranoid visions to yourself. Because those of us that believe in taking action do not want to hear it.   


SleepyGuyYawn

Re: Identity Theft and Law School Applications: I am a Victim
« Reply #43 on: June 19, 2005, 05:51:47 PM »
Look, you are the one crying about the sky falling. According to you, we are not safe anywhere. Our information will get stolen at a Walmart, A gas station, and a restaurant.

No, I'm saying the sky has already fallen, and it just isn't that big a deal.  Because most people aren't affected.  You do take a chance when you use a credit/debit card.  And social security numbers can be easily obtained through public records available on the internet.  I used to work for a union as an organizer and we used a program that retrieved information about people.  It' had SSN on it for everybody.  Of course, we never used the SSN, but still we had them. 

So just by being alive in America you take a chance.  But the chance you'll fall victim is incredibly slim, and the fact that some laptop was stolen (probably by just a casual thief) doesn't increase your small risk by much, if at all.

Our credit is even being stolen as we speak by some shady Internet hacker who can retrieve our life story in a matter of 15 minutes. So we just might as well live our lives in fear and stay home 24/7.

No -- I suppose it's possible that it is being stolen as we speak.  But the chances are incredibly slim.  And I never said that we should live in fear.  You're the one who came up with that conclusion.  It doesn't really bother me so much.  Because the chance of me getting in a car accident tomorrow is probably 100 times more than the chance of me having my identity stolen.  So I just don't worry.  I'll cross the bridge if I come to it.

I don't subscribe to that line of thinking.

You assume I do?  Just for the record, let me speak for myself.


I don't subscribe to this belief that since there is a good chance that credit theft could happen, it will happen.

Either do I.  There is an incredibly small chance it will happen.  This said, it is still true that it would be easy for somebody to do it (but still, the chances are slim that it'll happen). 

Instead, I like to take precautions to protect myself. And when the organizations responsible for taking care of our information fail, we have to hold them accountable. Because while I was protecting myself, they let their guard down. Now, I have a greater chance of becoming a victim of credit fraud due to their negligence.

Girl, you weren't protecting yourself.  There is no way to protect yourself.  Get used to that idea.  And your chances of being a victim of fraud aren't really increased by more than a .00001% chance.

And yes, I don't think that people should use their Social security numbers on their applications. Many schools have recognized the security threat and they are now asking for our LSAC ID numbers instead of SSN. I don't see anything wrong with taking this precaution.

You still have this idea that your social security number is somehow secret.  Listen, if I had your first, middle, and last name and knew what city you lived in, I could find your social security number in ten minutes.  Of course, I don't care what your SSN is, but it's not secret.  But then, either is anybody elses.  So you're protected because of the fact that there are 300 million Americans and only fairly small number (albeit growing number) of cases of identity fraud in America each year.

And you say that the chances of somebody using our SSN is very slim? You must be speaking out of your ass because there is not any data to support your claim. Thieves steal identity records in order to sell these records or to commit identity theft, period. In other words, this security breach has increased my chances of becoming a victim of credit fraud.

Oh nonsense.  This laptop wasn't stolen by the mafia or a professional thief.  You know the chances of that?  Laptops are stolen all the time, but because laptops are worth a lot of money on ebay.  This laptop was stolen by some kid or some casual thief who needed a fix or needed diapers for their kid. 

I believe in taking action and protecting myself. I do not believe in rolling over and playing dead because of a fear that because the probability of credit theft is high, it is going to happen. No, that is a fallacy. So you can keep you paranoid visions to yourself. Because those of us that believe in taking action do not want to hear it.   

And I don't believe in fixating on things I can't do anything about.  You can panic if you want, but you'd be better off worrying about the next time you drive your car or ride your bike. 

Besides, identitiy theft is rarely as catostrophic as we hear about on Dateline or 60 minutes -- those types of things are extreme cases.  Normally it's not terribly difficult to get your credit card company to refund you the money or get your credit fixed.