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Post stories of ongoing Discrimination here

_BP_

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Post stories of ongoing Discrimination here
« on: June 07, 2005, 10:35:35 AM »
I hate to start a million threads, but I've been wanting to do this.  Especially for all those people who are like, "discrimination, what discrimination?"

First article:

Racial Bias Found in Suburban NYC Rentals

Tests designed to uncover discrimination found that nearly half the real-estate agencies in New York City's northern suburbs treated blacks and Latinos unfairly, an equal-housing group alleged Monday.

Findings related to the most egregious offenders—seven of 25 Westchester County agencies—are being referred to state Attorney General Eliot Spitzer or to the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development for investigation, said Toni Downes, executive director of Westchester Residential Opportunities.

The group said it used its testers in areas that are heavily white and have good stocks of moderately priced apartments.

"It is shocking that we are still doing this," Downes said, noting it's been 37 years since the passage of the federal Fair Housing Act.

The fair-housing group, with funds supplied by the attorney general's office, conducted 58 tests at 25 agencies between July 2004 and February 2005. First it sent a white person to inquire about available rentals, then a minority assuming the same income, family and other characteristics of the white person.

In 27 instances at 12 agencies, unequal treatment based on race or ethnicity or racial "steering" to certain neighborhoods was found, the group alleged.

Downes said discrimination was clear in a comparison of the number of apartments shown minority testers with those shown white testers.

Minorities "were not shown the apartments they should have been shown," she said. "In many instances they were not shown any at all."

Nick Beilenson, president of the board at Westchester Residential Opportunities, said a typical case of discrimination might occur when an agent "panders to the owner of the apartment, when he feels 'If we send a minority to this apartment the owners are not going to like it.'" That's a violation of the law, he noted.

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Re: Post stories of ongoing Discrimination here
« Reply #1 on: June 07, 2005, 10:48:28 AM »

A conservative Christian group launched a boycott against Ford Motor Co. (No. 11 on The DiversityInc Top 50 Companies for Diversity list and No. 2 on The Top 10 Companies for GLBT employees) Tuesday, saying the second-largest U.S. automaker has given thousands of dollars to gay-rights groups, offers benefits to same-sex couples and actively recruits gay employees.

"From redefining family to include homosexual marriage, to giving hundreds of thousands of dollars to support homosexual groups and their agenda, to forcing managers to attend diversity training on how to promote the acceptance of homosexuality... Ford leads the way," American Family Association (AFA) chairman Donald Wildmon said in a statement.

Ford responded that it respects its customers and employees.

"Ford values all people, regardless of their race, religion, gender, sexual orientation and cultural or physical differences," Ford vice president of human resources Joe Laymon said.

General Motors (No. 48 on The DiversityInc Top 50 Companies for Diversity list) and Chrysler Corp. also provide benefits for same-sex partners.

Tupelo, Miss.–based AFA said it e-mailed an announcement about the Ford boycott to 2.2 million supporters. AFA special projects director Randy Sharp said nearly 55,000 people had signed a pledge supporting the boycott by Tuesday afternoon.

Ford was the only automaker among the 56 companies that got the highest rating last year from the Human Rights Campaign, a gay-rights group. Companies are rated on several factors, including whether they offer benefits to gay partners, donate to gay-rights groups and market their products to gays.

Re: Post stories of ongoing Discrimination here
« Reply #2 on: June 07, 2005, 02:50:47 PM »
BUSD Settles Berkeley High Discrimination Expulsion Suit

The Berkeley Unified School District notified families last week that it has reached a settlement in the Smith v. BUSD Board of Education case, a 2004 class action suit filed on behalf of three minority Berkeley students—two African-Americans and one Latino—who claimed that their education at Berkeley High was disrupted by improper expulsions.
The settlement, first reached in March, was ratified in federal district court last month. The district must notify all school families in preparation for a hearing to approve the agreement in July.

While denying that the three students were improperly kept out of school, the Berkeley Unified School District agreed to a settlement in which the students—and any other African-American or Latino students who could prove that they were unlawfully excluded from the regular school program—will be reinstated to the general school population, have their student records corrected, and be given district-sponsored makeup instruction to make up for any comprehensive instruction they might have missed.

In addition, the district must establish a plan to “reduce disproportionally the number of African-American and Latino students recommended for expulsion, formally expelled, and reassigned to alternative school programs.”

The settlement does not require the district to make any financial compensation to the affected students.

One of the students, Yarman Smith, claimed in the complaint that he was removed from Berkeley High School for two months between January and March of 2004 without a legally required hearing. Juan Muñoz claimed that he was excluded from the high school from the fall of 2002 through the summer of 2004 without a hearing, and Summer McNeil said she was excluded between November 2003 and the summer of 2004.

The plaintiffs were represented by the Pillsbury Winthrop law firm of Palo Alto on a pro bono basis, as well as the nonprofit Legal Services for Children of San Francisco and the Youth and Education Law Clinic of Stanford Law School.

The complaint alleged that each of the students was “excluded indefinitely from the district’s comprehensive educational programs and was either provided no educational services or provided substandard educational services through a county community school, continuation school or independent study.”

While Smith was initially offered no makeup for his two lost months, the district offered to enroll Muñoz at the Rock LaFleche county non-comprehensive community school. McNeil was offered a relocation to Berkeley Alternative High School and was enrolled in an independent study program called “Home Hospital Instruction,” even though she says in her claim that she was neither ill nor incapacitated.

Although the settlement only affects African-American and Latino students, the settlement required the district to send out notices to households with all students currently enrolled in the Berkeley public schools.

At the time the agreement was reached, Lagertha Smith, Yarman Smith’s mother, released a statement saying, “I am very pleased with the settlement because it not only affects my son, but it will prevent other students from being mistreated in the future. Being involved in this lawsuit has given my son more self-esteem, since he was empowered to stand up for his rights.”

Bill Koski, of the Youth and Education Law Clinic, added that “to Superintendent Michelle Lawrence’s credit, the Berkeley School District recognizes that students are entitled to due process. The agreement … shows that the district is committed to ensuring that students will no longer be wrongfully excluded from Berkeley schools.”

The district last week sent out notices to families explaining the settlement of the expulsion discrimination case, informing Berkeley parents of their rights if they think any of their children were kept out of school based on race.

BUSD Public Information Officer Mark Coplan said he has no idea how many students might actually be affected by the settlement. He said that the district has already received six or seven queries from parents.

“A couple of them wanted to know ,‘Did my child do something?’” he said. “And the rest wanted to know if their child’s situation might fit into the settlement.”

In addition to the mailed notices, the settlement requires the district to request that the Alameda County Probation Department, the Alameda County Department of Social Services, the Alameda County Juvenile Court, the Alameda County Family Court, the Berkeley Organization of Churches and Berkeley Youth Alternatives post the agreement at their headquarters or on their websites.

A hearing will be held on July 27 at 1 p.m. in federal district court in Oakland to consider final approval of the settlement.







Re: Post stories of ongoing Discrimination here
« Reply #3 on: June 07, 2005, 02:58:01 PM »
Discrimination lawsuit filed against Colorado company for alleged racial slurs against two black workers

The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission filed a racial discrimination lawsuit Friday against a company where a noose was allegedly hung over a chalk outline of a body in the work area of a black employee.

The EEOC claims that TXI, a buildings material company, discriminated against black, Hispanic and Arab or Middle Eastern employees and created a hostile work environment at the company's Boulder plant.

Black employees Michael Murphy and Roderick Jones were subjected to racial slurs and treated unfairly because of their race, the lawsuit alleges. In one incident, a noose was hung in Murphy's work area "over a chalk drawing of a human form drawn on the floor, with the words 'TXI retirement plan,"' according to the lawsuit.

"As awful as racial slurs like these are, the display of the noose - a symbol of violent bigotry - conveys an implied threat and is utterly unconscionable," Joseph Mitchell, regional attorney for the EEOC, said in a statement.

Murphy resigned in October 2002; Jones remains employed by TXI.

The commission is suing TXI for violations of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. "It's a pretty egregious case," said Nancy Weeks, an attorney for the EEOC.

TXI could not be reached for comment after business hours Friday.

The EEOC enforces federal laws prohibiting employment discrimination on the basis of race, color, sex, religion, age or disability.

 


Re: Post stories of ongoing Discrimination here
« Reply #4 on: June 07, 2005, 03:03:05 PM »
Racial discrimination suit filed against Iten Chevrolet

A federal lawsuit filed Tuesday contends that suburban car dealer Iten Chevrolet has engaged in a pattern of racial discrimination, including instances in which managers used racial epithets in describing employees and customers who were members of minority groups.

The dealership is a longtime fixture in Brooklyn Center, and sits near some of the metro area's most racially diverse neighborhoods. It faced similar complaints in the 1990s, reaching an of-court settlement of allegations that racial stereotypes and off-color jokes were common at the company.

Iten's attorney, William Clelland, called the latest accusations "outrageous" and "lurid." He said the lawsuit was filed after an attorney for Ron Budhram, a fired employee who is Indian-American, set Tuesday as a deadline for the dealership to agree to a $450,000 settlement.

"It's a ransom note more than anything else," said Clelland, who said Budhram only filed suit after losing a claim before the federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.

In a letter last week to Iten's attorneys, Budhram's lawyer, Robert Hajek, offered to negotiate a settlement and added that, "needless to say, a company that receives 60-70% of its business from minority customers would be damaged by public knowledge of your client's inappropriate business practices."

In his lawsuit, Budhram, a 10-year employee, said he was fired in December for allegedly working on side jobs involving auto repair -- a common practice at the dealership, he said -- but claims that the real reason for his dismissal was racial. He said his firing came after he pressed the dealership to enforce a policy against racial discrimination. At the time, said Budhram, the 90-employee dealership had five employees who are member of minority groups.

Budhram said the dealership had a racially discriminatory atmosphere during his employment, much of it directed at blacks. In one instance, the suit said, a business consultant at the dealership came across a group of minority and white employees as they were eating and asked, "Why are all the dark-skinned employees standing around?"

On another occasion, the suit stated, a minority employee asked Iten service manager Steve Marchand for permission to go home because his family was without heat after the furnace had stopped working. According to the suit, Marchand, who is named as a defendant, responded "I suppose you can go home. You black guys and your heat -- you gotta have your heat."

On at least a half-dozen occasions, the suit added, Marchand referred to Budhram as "my little brown man.


_BP_

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Re: Post stories of ongoing Discrimination here
« Reply #5 on: June 07, 2005, 03:15:11 PM »
Discrimination lawsuit filed against Colorado company for alleged racial slurs against two black workers

The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission filed a racial discrimination lawsuit Friday against a company where a noose was allegedly hung over a chalk outline of a body in the work area of a black employee.

The EEOC claims that TXI, a buildings material company, discriminated against black, Hispanic and Arab or Middle Eastern employees and created a hostile work environment at the company's Boulder plant.

Black employees Michael Murphy and Roderick Jones were subjected to racial slurs and treated unfairly because of their race, the lawsuit alleges. In one incident, a noose was hung in Murphy's work area "over a chalk drawing of a human form drawn on the floor, with the words 'TXI retirement plan,"' according to the lawsuit.

"As awful as racial slurs like these are, the display of the noose - a symbol of violent bigotry - conveys an implied threat and is utterly unconscionable," Joseph Mitchell, regional attorney for the EEOC, said in a statement.

Murphy resigned in October 2002; Jones remains employed by TXI.

The commission is suing TXI for violations of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. "It's a pretty egregious case," said Nancy Weeks, an attorney for the EEOC.

TXI could not be reached for comment after business hours Friday.

The EEOC enforces federal laws prohibiting employment discrimination on the basis of race, color, sex, religion, age or disability.

 



This is wild...OMG haha

Re: Post stories of ongoing Discrimination here
« Reply #6 on: June 07, 2005, 03:20:16 PM »
this was definitely an excellent idea for a thread BP...so whenever we see people post that discrimination and racism exists only because minorities won't let it go.. we can refer them to this thread

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Re: Post stories of ongoing Discrimination here
« Reply #7 on: June 07, 2005, 03:21:56 PM »
this was definitely an excellent idea for a thread BP...so whenever we see people post that discrimination and racism exists only because minorities won't let it go.. we can refer them to this thread

xactly Blk_Reign  ;)

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Re: Post stories of ongoing Discrimination here
« Reply #8 on: June 07, 2005, 03:27:25 PM »
Yet another study finds that racial discrimination is alive and well in the hiring process, and it's keeping black men in metro Milwaukee on the unemployment rolls.

The study offers this fictional scenario:

A young, white, male high school graduate with a felony conviction applies in person for entry level jobs as a driver, a dishwasher, a laborer, warehouse worker and production worker that are advertised in the newspaper and admits to employers that he served 18 months in prison for possession of cocaine with intent to sell.

A young black man with similar education, work history and style of presentation, but with no criminal record, applies for the same jobs.

Who do you think is more likely to be called back?

If you picked the white man with the felony conviction, you guessed right.


This study offers evidence that discrimination remains a major factor in the economic lives of black men, and highlights the fear and misunderstanding of black males that permeate the local job market.

Devah Pager, a sociologist at Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill., sent equally matched pairs of testers - two black and two white - to apply for low-skilled jobs at 350 places of employment in the Milwaukee area and found that white ex-offenders were more likely to be called back for an interview than black applicants who had no criminal record.

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Re: Post stories of ongoing Discrimination here
« Reply #9 on: June 07, 2005, 03:35:09 PM »
I like this one, cause it's discrimination before they even see you. LOL

Your Name Could Turn Off
Employers Who Discriminate
   
   
By Jennifer Hicks

From IMDiversity
   

A recent study shows that people with "white-sounding" names are 50% more likely to get a response to their resume than are those with "black-sounding" names.

The study, done by professors at the Massachusetts Institute for Technology and the University of Chicago Graduate school of Business, mailed 5,000 resumes in response to job ads in both the Boston Globe and the Chicago Tribune. Four resumes were sent for each job posting; two well-qualified resumes, one each with a "black-" and "white-sounding" name, and two lesser qualified resumes, again one each for black and white.

Whites Receive More Responses

The resumes that had less gaps in employment and higher-level skills -- if they belonged to "white-sounding" names -- had a 30% greater chance of being responded to than the less qualified resume. However, this was not true for the same skilled resume of a "black-sounding" name.

Names were chosen after a study of birth certificates. "White" names included Kristen, Greg, Neil, Emily, Brett, Anne and Jill. "Black" names included Kareem, Tamika, Rasheed, Ebony, Aisha and Tyrone. Resumes with "black-sounding" names had only a 6.7% chance of receiving a response to their resume, while resumes with "white-sounding" names had a 10.1% chance.

The study found as much discrimination in less-skilled jobs, such as cashiering and mailroom attendants, as in more heavily skills-based positions such as regional sales manager and assistant to the president jobs.

Discrimination Becomes Unconscious

This has led some to question whether the resume screeners simply assumed that, as a legacy of deeply-rooted, ingrained and now almost-unconscious racism, blacks were less qualified than whites.

So, what can done to eradicate this inequity?

On Jan. 20, 2003, the National Public Radio program "Connections" tried to answer this. Joining the talk program were Sendhil Mullainathan, professor of economics at MIT, and Preston Edwards, Sr., chief executive office of IMDiversity, Inc., and publisher of IMDiversity.com.

Edwards, who has spent his career championing diversity in the workforce, suggested that many companies explain the absence of minorities in their workforce by saying, " 'They're not qualified, or we can't find them.' We need to take a look at their human-resources practices."

"If a company is committed to diversity, they need to make it a goal," said Edwards. "A CEO will certainly look into why sales are off by 10% because that means the company hasn't met its goals. If diversity is also a goal, then the CEO needs to take a good look at why their recruiting and hiring programs are not meeting that goal."

Reasons Why and Solutions

But not all agree that diversity is something companies should be looking for. Callers to the program and writers to IMDiversity.com range in their opinions.

One caller suggested that blacks were too litigious and that caused small and midsize businesses to screen them out. He admitted that this was only anecdotal reality rather than real reality, and suggested we had to overcome this mindset before blacks would be hired as readily as whites.

Another caller suggested that one way to quickly reverse the problem would be to stop doing business with those companies that do not hire African Americans.

But the type of prejudice the study found is "low-level and underneath," according to Mullainathan. "Most of the people in the HR departments would not actively discriminate and name-based discrimination makes it much more tricky now to prove discrimination than in King's time," he said.