Law School Discussion

In @ Widener

Re: In @ Widener
« Reply #40 on: January 16, 2005, 08:26:13 PM »
Quote
Honestly, then, what is wrong with the area around the Grand Opera House -- I'm not joking -- it sucked in that neighborhood, and it was only 7PM.  We managed to eat a place called National -- an Asian Fusion restaraunt -- not a bad spot, but that's all the city is going to have near one of the main attractions?  How close is that to Trolley Square?

Your guess is as good as mine, and you're definitely not joking.  I've seen the "ghost town" effect in full force when it was still light out.  The Grand Opera House and the nearby Hotel DuPont/Playhouse Theater aren't near Trolley Square or anything else enticing that I know of (although National and a couple of other restaurants have opened since I was last there), and my suspicion is that traditionally people going to a show at either venue were eating at the Green Room at the hotel -- which is a wonderful restaurant, by all accounts, but incredibly pricey.  I think the area hasn't successfully transitioned into offering an inviting experience to people not in their traditional furs-and-tuxedoes crowd.

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Re: In @ Widener
« Reply #41 on: January 17, 2005, 09:58:40 AM »
Quote
Honestly, then, what is wrong with the area around the Grand Opera House -- I'm not joking -- it sucked in that neighborhood, and it was only 7PM.  We managed to eat a place called National -- an Asian Fusion restaraunt -- not a bad spot, but that's all the city is going to have near one of the main attractions?  How close is that to Trolley Square?

Your guess is as good as mine, and you're definitely not joking.  I've seen the "ghost town" effect in full force when it was still light out.  The Grand Opera House and the nearby Hotel DuPont/Playhouse Theater aren't near Trolley Square or anything else enticing that I know of (although National and a couple of other restaurants have opened since I was last there), and my suspicion is that traditionally people going to a show at either venue were eating at the Green Room at the hotel -- which is a wonderful restaurant, by all accounts, but incredibly pricey.  I think the area hasn't successfully transitioned into offering an inviting experience to people not in their traditional furs-and-tuxedoes crowd.

Yeah -- we get down there about an hour before the show, and we're both mid-twenties.  It's a David Sedaris reading, so it's going to attract people of all ages.  There's a restaraunt across the street, sold out.  There's National, where we luckily grab the last table by the bar and get two bowls of soup and two Guinness before the show, and then the incredibly expensive restaraunt in the hotel.  I couldn't believe that's what the choices were.  We kicked ourselves for not stopping at one of the gagillion chain restaraunts on 202 on the way in.  I guess the area of the town that isn't a ghost town is across town on the other side somewhere.

The weird part was, we were near all the tallest buildings, like the business district -- so I thought that should be the busy part.  I thought for a minute I had a lot to learn about Wilmington, but then I decided I didn't really care to. :)

Re: In @ Widener
« Reply #42 on: January 17, 2005, 10:51:01 AM »
For a city of 76,000, there is not much to any part of the city of Wilmington.  Newark (15 miles to the southwest) actually has more to offer.

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Re: In @ Widener
« Reply #43 on: January 17, 2005, 01:03:27 PM »
For a city of 76,000, there is not much to any part of the city of Wilmington.  Newark (15 miles to the southwest) actually has more to offer.

I just found it weird because I'm familiar with other cities of that size that are not as desolate.  Scranton has NO Fortune 500 company HQs, Wilmington has several, but if you walk around Scranton at night, it doesn't seem dangerous or nearly as empty, and there are at least 6-8 bars worth going to that you can just stumble across.  I found Wilmington to be unique in its lack of life.

Re: In @ Widener
« Reply #44 on: January 17, 2005, 01:11:54 PM »
KevDog,
  I remember you mentioning West Chester.  Do you have any more info on that city? 

Also, how far is it from Villanova, Temple, or Penn?  Would it be difficult to commute from West Chester to Widener or Villanova?

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Re: In @ Widener
« Reply #45 on: January 17, 2005, 01:19:39 PM »
KevDog,
  I remember you mentioning West Chester.  Do you have any more info on that city? 

Also, how far is it from Villanova, Temple, or Penn?  Would it be difficult to commute from West Chester to Widener or Villanova?

West Chester is the county seat of Chester County, a very rural/suburban county right near Philadelphia.  It has a population of 18,000 people, I think, or thereabouts.  It is home to West Chester University, which is in the PA State System of higher education, a group of 14 schools (no, Penn State, Pitt, and Temple are not in this group) which have low tuitions to make a college education possible to everyone in PA.

Between being a Philly suburb, a small city in its own right, the county seat (and therefore, home to lawyers who work at the courthouse), and a college town, the place has a very urbane feeling to it.  There are LOTS of bars and restaraunts, as well as coffee shops and art galleries.  It's a cute town, so to speak, and the rent is relatively low.  There is no train station going to Philadelphia or anywhere else for that matter.  Immediately outside of West Chester, on most sides, are lots of strip malls and housing developments, however the town's core is very vibrant, alive, walkable, and liveable. 

You could commute to Widener from there, it would be about a 10-20 minute car ride each direction, so that's no big deal at all.  You might have to pay for a parking space in one of the town's municipal parking decks because parking is scarce in town for street parking and most streets right in the immediate downtown.  The parking permit would be about $40 a month if your house didn't come with a parking spot.  Also outside town is a lot of farms, hills, and horse ranches -- it's beautiful over there and there is very much a town-and-country feel -- it's not redneckish, it's like posh countryside.  Lots of money.

I would not attempt to commute to Villanova, that would take an hour sometimes, depending on traffic, depite the school being only 15-20 miles from WC.  My longtime girlfriend lives in WC and if I went to Widener, I would consider getting an apartment down there, but I don't know yet.  That's quite a bit in the future for me to be thinking about.

It's a great town, and the houses/architecture are great.

Re: In @ Widener
« Reply #46 on: January 17, 2005, 01:35:10 PM »
Kev,
  That was an awesome response.  Thanks for awesome details. 

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Re: In @ Widener
« Reply #47 on: January 17, 2005, 01:38:42 PM »
Kev,
  That was an awesome response.  Thanks for awesome details. 

np -- did you hear from Widener yet?

Re: In @ Widener
« Reply #48 on: March 07, 2005, 01:46:30 AM »
Yeah, I heard.  Accepted.  I'm not sure about attending since I haven't heard back from a few other schools yet.  I'll probably make my final decision within the next month or so.

I'm a bit worried about Widener though.  That grading system they have is very unfavorable, and I'm not satisfied with the explanation they give on their website.  They say that they give out averages of 2.5-2.75 for each class because they want to create an environment of "academic rigor".  That is total bull, because Yale fosters the same environment and they don't even give out grades.  The real reason that Widener grades down their students is to:

A) Take away the scholarships from their 3.X-minimum first year GPA scholarship recipients.

B) Prevent their top students from transferring out to better schools.

I don't care what Widener says, if a student works for the "A" then give him or her the  "A", not some B- or B+ because of the stupid grading system.  Plus, employers don't have time to listen to a long story about why the Widener GPAs are low.  They see 3.0 and they think "Next!!  I'll take the person from Temple/Nova/Penn/Pitt/Rutgers with the 3.3".

I say, "Wait, Widener fosters an environment of academic excellence by curving down student grades to an average of two point...."  SLAM! (the door closes)

Thanks Widener.


Like I said, I am very concerned about this issue.  I am also not too thrilled on the fact that they sell their school on their (Wilmington) location, while never talking about the programs that they have for corporate law.  Sure, they have a program, but when it comes to hashing out the details they talk about how they are in Wilmington and that is supposed to sell me on it.  Well, why is it that Widener is so ridiculously outranked by so many schools who also have programs in corporate law, yet are not located in Delaware?  Location, location, location is true to a point, but Widener does not prove to me that their program is so exemplary that I will be secured a job right out of school.   

Re: In @ Widener
« Reply #49 on: March 07, 2005, 02:53:47 PM »
Congrats on your acceptance anyway, and good luck with your decision.