Law School Discussion

Anyone that remembers lr problems they had problems with- let's have them!!

Re: Anyone that remembers lr problems they had problems with- let's have them!!
« Reply #280 on: October 04, 2004, 10:00:38 PM »
remember the point at issue question regarding the 2 people taking about scientific theories?  I think I put soemthing in regards to whether or not scince issues were valid.




Is that the one about coniferous and deciduous trees?  If so, I think I put that just because something is of different lineages doesn't mean that it can't be called by the same name or something along those lines.

This post reminded me of a science LR question, I'm not sure, but I think it may have been regarding Einstein or some other scientists theory of something to do with the universe or space, and how another scientist had a better theory with regard to a particular aspect of the general theory. I think the question may have been a flaw question, stating something about now how we have replaced Einstein or Newton's theory with this second theory.  And I thought the flaw was that the second theory was specific only to certain aspects of the first theory.

Is this ringing a bell for anyone???  Boy this *&^% gets harder to remember as the days go by!!! :o

Might you be remembering one about Euclidean vs. non-Euclidean geometry?  It was an inference question, and the answer was something like, "Not all scientists now think Euclidean geometry provides the most accurate picture of the universe"

Re: Anyone that remembers lr problems they had problems with- let's have them!!
« Reply #281 on: October 04, 2004, 10:08:42 PM »
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This post reminded me of a science LR question, I'm not sure, but I think it may have been regarding Einstein or some other scientists theory of something to do with the universe or space, and how another scientist had a better theory with regard to a particular aspect of the general theory. I think the question may have been a flaw question, stating something about now how we have replaced Einstein or Newton's theory with this second theory.  And I thought the flaw was that the second theory was specific only to certain aspects of the first theory.

Is this ringing a bell for anyone???  Boy this *&^% gets harder to remember as the days go by!!! :o
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Might you be remembering one about Euclidean vs. non-Euclidean geometry?  It was an inference question, and the answer was something like, "Not all scientists now think Euclidean geometry provides the most accurate picture of the universe"[/size][/size][/i]

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Yes!  science... universe.... Euclid ....(Einstein/Euclid same difference to me!)  I am not certain I chose this answer however, I cannot recall what the other choices were.  I believe your answer was one of my final 2 contenders so hopefully I chose the correct one.

LSATGuru

Re: Anyone that remembers lr problems they had problems with- let's have them!!
« Reply #282 on: October 05, 2004, 06:16:55 AM »
Yeah, I was wrong about the conclusion of this one.  I agree with you that it was something like "Since naturals don't hurt us, synthetics won't hurt us."  The question stem was, I'm sure of it, "Weaken Except," and you were looking for four wrong answer choices that showed the two were different (because the argument is saying they are similar) and one answer choice that says they're similar (because the argument would be corroborated in this case) and the obvious correct answer choice was the one about their molecular structures being similar.  I don't remember what answer choice this was, maybe "B"?  But I'm fairly sure about this question.

Robot Pimp,
I thought it was weaken, but same logic holds, the chemical structure statement strengthens the argument.



This was a "Each of the following would WEAKEN the argument EXCEPT" question--I specifically remember it.

The credited response was about the chemical structure being virtually identical--this would strengthen/be neutral in that it suggests they wouldn't be harmed by the chemicals, but the argument is stating that the pesticides WOULD harm people.

The answer choice about "people getting used to the natural pesticides" is wrong because that weakens the argument.  If people are used to the natural pesticides, then it's much more likely than these "new" "synthetic" pesticides could, in fact, hurt people, because they're not used to consuming them as they are the organic pesticides.

Does anyone remember the question about pesticides?

Also, the question about the two different trees and what the two speakers disagree on....

For the pesticides, was the right answer:

1:) Humans have had time to adapt to natural pesticides or

2:) Synthetic and natural pesticides are similar in chemical structure...

The correct answer is the first one you listed; the second answer actually strengthens the argument by claiming synthetic pesticides are roughly the same as natural ones, which have been tolerated by the body.  The first choice weakens the argument by claiming that we are safe from natural pesticides only because we have had time to adjust to the natural pesticides



Are you sure about this?  I thought the argument was basically saying that synthetic is different from natural because they are made by humans vs. what the plant produces naturally and therefore they differ in some way (i.e. chemical structure or makeup.)  If it were the case that they were similar in chemical structure and the human body could tolerate natural pesticides then it should tolerate synthetic as well.  I put answer 2 on that list.

LSATGuru

Re: Anyone that remembers lr problems they had problems with- let's have them!!
« Reply #283 on: October 05, 2004, 06:19:51 AM »
I remember this one.  Yes, I think what can be concluded was something like "Most scientists no longer think that a Eucleidean theory holds the answer to solving the cosmos." Because it said that the new "non-Eucleidean" theory was now "generally accepted" as being better than the old "Eucleidean" theory.  I don't remember this as being a very hard "must be true."

[
Quote

This post reminded me of a science LR question, I'm not sure, but I think it may have been regarding Einstein or some other scientists theory of something to do with the universe or space, and how another scientist had a better theory with regard to a particular aspect of the general theory. I think the question may have been a flaw question, stating something about now how we have replaced Einstein or Newton's theory with this second theory.  And I thought the flaw was that the second theory was specific only to certain aspects of the first theory.

Is this ringing a bell for anyone???  Boy this *&^% gets harder to remember as the days go by!!! :o
Quote

Might you be remembering one about Euclidean vs. non-Euclidean geometry?  It was an inference question, and the answer was something like, "Not all scientists now think Euclidean geometry provides the most accurate picture of the universe"[/size][/size][/i]

Quote

Re: Anyone that remembers lr problems they had problems with- let's have them!!
« Reply #284 on: October 05, 2004, 07:13:30 AM »
Im pretty sure that there were five total spots...

arpatel530

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Re: Anyone that remembers lr problems they had problems with- let's have them!!
« Reply #285 on: October 05, 2004, 07:22:42 AM »
F could only be in three spots.  One rule was that "G is a 10th century painting and he is in exactly 1 spot." If there are 4 total spots, that means that G must occupy one spot and F can fill up the other three. G could be in Spot 2, so your second answer wasn't right either :-p  Since G had to be 10th century, the third spot could be F or O as 10th century and then 1 and 4 could be 9th or 8th century, making it okay for G to be in 2 and 3, but not 1 and 4.

There was a couple of "If" questions, I believe, and a "could be true."  The key to this game was to know that G can't be in 1 or 4, both O and F could be in 1, 2, 3, or 4, and that if it's an 8th century it has to be 0, but there was no requirement that any of the 4 paintings be 8th century. 

Does anyone remember if the rules dictated that there must be an 8th, 9th, and 10th century painting present?

Does anyone remember the first 3 questions and answers they got for the architect game?
I messed up the game and am trying to get a feel of how I did so I know if I should possibly cancel.

The last two were:

What sites can G not be: 1,2,4
What is the maximum number of sites F could be: 4

does anyone remember the first 3?


no the question to what sites can G not be: are not 1,2 and 4

The last rule in the question read that painting in slot 3 had to be from a later period than the paintings in either number 1 OR number 4....the OR being the key word...
so therefore G from 10 can be in 1 OR 4 but the other has to be from a period earlier than painting number 3

Does that ring a bell to anyone??

ljm7

Re: Anyone that remembers lr problems they had problems with- let's have them!!
« Reply #286 on: October 05, 2004, 07:31:56 AM »
I think there's some sort of mix up.

The rules as I remember them were as follows:

5 sites of either F,G, or O

the second site is 9th century
if the site is 8th century it is 0
O can't be fourth or fifth
there is exactly one site that is G and it is 10th century
and the third spot is more recent than the first or fourth.

That as I see it would put the state as


F/O|F/O|G/F/O|F|G/F
8/9|_9_|__10_|9|9/10


Were there not 5 total spots?

Also this would be consistant with my logic that G cannot be 1,2, or 4th and also that there can be 4 F's.

Can anyone comment on this set and/or add what they remember of the first three questions?


F could only be in three spots.  One rule was that "G is a 10th century painting and he is in exactly 1 spot." If there are 4 total spots, that means that G must occupy one spot and F can fill up the other three. G could be in Spot 2, so your second answer wasn't right either :-p  Since G had to be 10th century, the third spot could be F or O as 10th century and then 1 and 4 could be 9th or 8th century, making it okay for G to be in 2 and 3, but not 1 and 4.

There was a couple of "If" questions, I believe, and a "could be true."  The key to this game was to know that G can't be in 1 or 4, both O and F could be in 1, 2, 3, or 4, and that if it's an 8th century it has to be 0, but there was no requirement that any of the 4 paintings be 8th century. 

Does anyone remember if the rules dictated that there must be an 8th, 9th, and 10th century painting present?

Does anyone remember the first 3 questions and answers they got for the architect game?
I messed up the game and am trying to get a feel of how I did so I know if I should possibly cancel.

The last two were:

What sites can G not be: 1,2,4
What is the maximum number of sites F could be: 4

does anyone remember the first 3?


arpatel530

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Re: Anyone that remembers lr problems they had problems with- let's have them!!
« Reply #287 on: October 05, 2004, 07:38:26 AM »
I think there's some sort of mix up.

The rules as I remember them were as follows:

5 sites of either F,G, or O

the second site is 9th century
if the site is 8th century it is 0
O can't be fourth or fifth
there is exactly one site that is G and it is 10th century
and the third spot is more recent than the first or fourth.

That as I see it would put the state as


F/O|F/O|G/F/O|F|G/F
8/9|_9_|__10_|9|9/10


Were there not 5 total spots?

Also this would be consistant with my logic that G cannot be 1,2, or 4th and also that there can be 4 F's.

Can anyone comment on this set and/or add what they remember of the first three questions?


F could only be in three spots.  One rule was that "G is a 10th century painting and he is in exactly 1 spot." If there are 4 total spots, that means that G must occupy one spot and F can fill up the other three. G could be in Spot 2, so your second answer wasn't right either :-p  Since G had to be 10th century, the third spot could be F or O as 10th century and then 1 and 4 could be 9th or 8th century, making it okay for G to be in 2 and 3, but not 1 and 4.

There was a couple of "If" questions, I believe, and a "could be true."  The key to this game was to know that G can't be in 1 or 4, both O and F could be in 1, 2, 3, or 4, and that if it's an 8th century it has to be 0, but there was no requirement that any of the 4 paintings be 8th century. 

Does anyone remember if the rules dictated that there must be an 8th, 9th, and 10th century painting present?

Does anyone remember the first 3 questions and answers they got for the architect game?
I messed up the game and am trying to get a feel of how I did so I know if I should possibly cancel.

The last two were:

What sites can G not be: 1,2,4
What is the maximum number of sites F could be: 4

does anyone remember the first 3?



Yes you are correct about the rules, however what did the question exactly state about what sites could not be G?
For example say

1. G10 2. F/0 9 3. F/O 10 4. F 9   5. F 9/10

and how about

1. O 8  2. F/O 9  3. F/O 9   4. G 10   4. F 9

that way G can actually be 1 or 4


ljm7

Re: Anyone that remembers lr problems they had problems with- let's have them!!
« Reply #288 on: October 05, 2004, 07:48:16 AM »
So basically you're saying that the or in the rule of "site 3 is more recent than site 1 or site 4" means it did not have to be both. I guess the question is did it say "more recent than either site one or site four"   or "more recent than site one and site four"  I took it to mean that it was more recent than both.  Does any remember how the interpreted this?

superiorlobe

Re: Anyone that remembers lr problems they had problems with- let's have them!!
« Reply #289 on: October 05, 2004, 07:50:40 AM »
It had to be more recent than both 1 and 4.