Law School Discussion

Specific Groups => Black Law Students => Topic started by: crazy8 on July 25, 2006, 06:39:08 AM

Title: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: crazy8 on July 25, 2006, 06:39:08 AM
Anything interesting in the news today?  Post it here!!!
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Burning Sands, Esq. on July 25, 2006, 06:49:07 AM
the internet librarian hard at work I see
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: crazy8 on July 25, 2006, 06:51:02 AM
the internet librarian hard at work I see

whatever hater!  I enjoy reading some of these articles, but oftentimes miss them because of where they're posted.  You're just mad because I created it before you could....Sir Mod   :P

EDIT: Aight, just so you don't feel left out you can search all of BLSD and move any article ever posted onto this thread.  :D
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: scurred1 on July 25, 2006, 06:56:51 AM
http://www.boston.com/news/nation/washington/articles/2006/07/23/civil_rights_hiring_shifted_in_bush_era?mode=PF

Civil rights hiring shifted in Bush era
Conservative leanings stressed
By Charlie Savage, Globe Staff  |  July 23, 2006

WASHINGTON -- The Bush administration is quietly remaking the Justice Department's Civil Rights Division, filling the permanent ranks with lawyers who have strong conservative credentials but little experience in civil rights, according to job application materials obtained by the Globe.

The documents show that only 42 percent of the lawyers hired since 2003, after the administration changed the rules to give political appointees more influence in the hiring process, have civil rights experience. In the two years before the change, 77 percent of those who were hired had civil rights backgrounds.

In an acknowledgment of the department's special need to be politically neutral, hiring for career jobs in the Civil Rights Division under all recent administrations, Democratic and Republican, had been handled by civil servants -- not political appointees.

But in the fall of 2002, then-attorney general John Ashcroft changed the procedures. The Civil Rights Division disbanded the hiring committees made up of veteran career lawyers.

For decades, such committees had screened thousands of resumes, interviewed candidates, and made recommendations that were only rarely rejected.

Now, hiring is closely overseen by Bush administration political appointees to Justice, effectively turning hundreds of career jobs into politically appointed positions.

The profile of the lawyers being hired has since changed dramatically, according to the resumes of successful applicants to the voting rights, employment litigation, and appellate sections. Under the Freedom of Information Act, the Globe obtained the resumes among hundreds of pages of hiring data from 2001 to 2006.

Hires with traditional civil rights backgrounds -- either civil rights litigators or members of civil rights groups -- have plunged. Only 19 of the 45 lawyers hired since 2003 in those three sections were experienced in civil rights law, and of those, nine gained their experience either by defending employers against discrimination lawsuits or by fighting against race-conscious policies.

Meanwhile, conservative credentials have risen sharply. Since 2003 the three sections have hired 11 lawyers who said they were members of the conservative Federalist Society. Seven hires in the three sections are listed as members of the Republican National Lawyers Association, including two who volunteered for Bush-Cheney campaigns.

Several new hires worked for prominent conservatives, including former Whitewater prosecutor Kenneth Starr, former attorney general Edwin Meese, Mississippi Senator Trent Lott, and Judge Charles Pickering. And six listed Christian organizations that promote socially conservative views.

The changes in those three sections are echoed to varying degrees throughout the Civil Rights Division, according to current and former staffers.

At the same time, the kinds of cases the Civil Rights Division is bringing have undergone a shift. The division is bringing fewer voting rights and employment cases involving systematic discrimination against African-Americans, and more alleging reverse discrimination against whites and religious discrimination against Christians.

``There has been a sea change in the types of cases brought by the division, and that is not likely to change in a new administration because they are hiring people who don't have an expressed interest in traditional civil rights enforcement," said Richard Ugelow, a 29-year career veteran who left the division in 2002.


No `litmus test' claimed
The Bush administration is not the first to seek greater control over the Civil Rights Division. Presidents Richard Nixon and Ronald Reagan tried to limit the division's efforts to enforce school-desegregation busing and affirmative action. But neither Nixon nor Reagan pushed political loyalists deep in the permanent bureaucracy, longtime employees say.

The Bush administration denies that its changes to the hiring procedures have political overtones. Cynthia Magnuson , a Justice Department spokeswoman, said the division had no ``litmus test" for hiring. She insisted that the department hired only ``qualified attorneys."

Magnuson also objected to measuring civil rights experience by participation in organizations devoted to advancing traditional civil rights causes. She noted that many of the division's lawyers had been clerks for federal judges, where they ``worked on litigation involving constitutional law, which is obviously relevant to a certain degree."

Other defenders of the Bush administration say there is nothing improper about the winner of a presidential election staffing government positions with like-minded officials. And, they say, the old career staff at the division was partisan in its own way -- an entrenched bureaucracy of liberals who did not support the president's view of civil rights policy.

Robert Driscoll , a deputy assistant attorney general over the division from 2001 to 2003, said many of the longtime career civil rights attorneys wanted to bring big cases on behalf of racial groups based on statistical disparities in hiring, even without evidence of intentional discrimination. Conservatives, he said, prefer to focus on cases that protect individuals from government abuses of power.

Hiring only lawyers from civil rights groups would ``set the table for a permanent left-wing career class," Driscoll said.

But Jim Turner , who worked for the division from 1965 to 1994 and was the top-ranked professional in the division for the last 25 years of his career, said that hiring people who are interested in enforcing civil rights laws is not the same thing as trying to achieve a political result through hiring.

Most people interested in working to enforce civil rights laws happen to be liberals, Turner said, but Congress put the laws on the books so that they would be enforced. ``To say that the Civil Rights Division had a special penchant for hiring liberal lawyers is twisting things," he said.

Jon Greenbaum , who was a career attorney in the voting rights section from 1997 to 2003, said that since the hiring change, candidates with conservative ties have had an advantage.

``The clear emphasis has been to hire individuals with conservative credentials," he said. ``If anything, a civil rights background is considered a liability."

But Roger Clegg , who was a deputy assistant attorney general for civil rights during the Reagan administration, said that the change in career hiring is appropriate to bring some ``balance" to what he described as an overly liberal agency.

``I don't think there is anything sinister about any of this. . . . You are not morally required to support racial preferences just because you are working for the Civil Rights Division," Clegg said.

Many lawyers in the division, who spoke on condition of anonymity, describe a clear shift in agenda accompanying the new hires. As The Washington Post reported last year, division supervisors overruled the recommendations of longtime career voting-rights attorneys in several high-profile cases, including whether to approve a Texas redistricting plan and whether to approve a Georgia law requiring voters to show photographic identification.

In addition, many experienced civil rights lawyers have been assigned to spend much of their time defending deportation orders rather than pursuing discrimination claims. Justice officials defend that practice, saying that attorneys throughout the department are sharing the burden of a deportation case backlog.

As a result, staffers say, morale has plunged and experienced lawyers are leaving the division. Last year, the administration offered longtime civil rights attorneys a buyout. Department figures show that 63 division attorneys left in 2005 -- nearly twice the average annual number of departures since the late 1990s.

At a recent NAACP hearing on the state of the Civil Rights Division, David Becker , who was a voting-rights section attorney for seven years before accepting the buyout offer, warned that the personnel changes threatened to permanently damage the nation's most important civil rights watchdog.

``Even during other administrations that were perceived as being hostile to civil rights enforcement, career staff did not leave in numbers approaching this level," Becker said. ``In the place of these experienced litigators and investigators, this administration has, all too often, hired inexperienced ideologues, virtually none of which have any civil rights or voting rights experiences."


Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: scurred1 on July 25, 2006, 06:57:17 AM
Dates from '57 law
Established in 1957 as part of the first civil rights bill since Reconstruction, the Civil Rights Division enforces the nation's antidiscrimination laws.

The 1957 law and subsequent civil rights acts directed the division to file lawsuits against state and local governments, submit ``friend-of-the-court" briefs in other discrimination cases, and review changes to election laws and redistricting to make sure they will not keep minorities from voting.

The division is managed by a president's appointees -- the assistant attorney general for civil rights and his deputies -- who are replaced when a new president takes office.

Beneath the political appointees, most of the work is carried out by a permanent staff of about 350 lawyers. They take complaints, investigate problems, propose lawsuits, litigate cases, and negotiate settlements.

Until recently, career attorneys also played an important role in deciding whom to hire when vacancies opened up in their ranks.

``We were looking for a strong academic record, for clerkships, and for evidence of an interest in civil rights enforcement," said William Yeomans , who worked for the division for 24 years, leaving in 2005.

Civil Rights Division supervisors of both parties almost always accepted the career attorneys' hiring recommendations, longtime staffers say. Charles Cooper , a former deputy assistant attorney general for civil rights in the Reagan administration, said the system of hiring through committees of career professionals worked well.

``There was obviously oversight from the front office, but I don't remember a time when an individual went through that process and was not accepted," Cooper said. ``I just don't think there was any quarrel with the quality of individuals who were being hired. And we certainly weren't placing any kind of political litmus test on . . . the individuals who were ultimately determined to be best qualified."

But during the fall 2002 hiring cycle, the Bush administration changed the rules. Longtime career attorneys say there was never an official announcement. The hiring committee simply was not convened, and eventually its members learned that it had been disbanded.

Driscoll, the former Bush administration appointee, said then-Attorney General John Ashcroft changed hiring rules for the entire Justice Department, not just the Civil Rights Division. But career officials say that the change had a particularly strong impact in the Civil Rights Division, where the potential for political interference is greater than in divisions that enforce less controversial laws.

Joe Rich , who joined the division in 1968 and who was chief of the voting rights section until he left last year, said that the change reduced career attorneys' input on hiring decisions to virtually nothing. Once the political appointees screened resumes and decided on a finalist for a job in his section, Rich said, they would invite him to sit in on the applicant's final interview but they wouldn't tell him who else had applied, nor did they ask his opinion about whether to hire the attorney.

The changes extended to the hiring of summer interns.

Danielle Leonard , who was one of the last lawyers to be hired into the voting rights section under the old system, said she volunteered to look through internship applications in 2002.

Leonard said she went through the resumes, putting Post-It Notes on them with comments, until her supervisor told her that career staff would no longer be allowed to review the intern resumes. Leonard removed her Post-Its from the resumes and a political aide took them away.

Leonard said she quit a few months later, having stayed in what she had thought would be her ``dream job" for less than a year, because she was frustrated and demoralized by the direction the division was taking.

The academic credentials of the lawyers hired into the division also underwent a shift at this time, the documents show. Attorneys hired by the career hiring committees largely came from Eastern law schools with elite reputations, while a greater proportion of the political appointees' hires instead attended Southern and Midwestern law schools with conservative reputations.

The average US News & World Report ranking for the law school attended by successful applicants hired in 2001 and 2002 was 34, while the average law school rank dropped to 44 for those hired after 2003.

Driscoll, the former division chief-of-staff, insisted that everyone he personally had hired was well qualified. And, he said, the old hiring committees' prejudice in favor of highly ranked law schools had unfairly blocked many qualified applicants.

``They would have tossed someone who was first in their class at the University of Kentucky Law School, whereas we'd say, hey, he's number one in his class, let's interview him," Driscoll said.


Learning from others
The Bush administration's effort to assert greater control over the Civil Rights Division is the latest chapter in a long-running drama between the agency and conservative presidents.

Nixon tried unsuccessfully to delay implementation of school desegregation plans. Reagan reversed the division's position on the tax-exempt status of racially discriminatory private schools and set a policy of opposing school busing and racial quotas.

Still, neither Nixon nor Reagan changed the division's procedures for hiring career staff, meaning that career attorneys who were dedicated to enforcing traditional civil rights continued to fill the ranks.

Yeomans said he believes the current administration learned a lesson from Nixon's and Reagan's experiences: To make changes permanent, it is necessary to reshape the civil rights bureaucracy.

``Reagan had tried to bring about big changes in civil rights enforcement and to pursue a much more conservative approach, but it didn't stick," Yeomans said. ``That was the goal here -- to leave behind a bureaucracy that approached civil rights the same way the political appointees did."
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: crazy8 on July 25, 2006, 07:00:36 AM
I heard this on the news Monday.  That's a damn shame!  How the heck are you going to have presidential appointees hiring attorneys for this job?  I'm telling you, I have to give Bush credit...he has recreated the rules governing this country and we've all sat and watched *shaking head*  ::)
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Burning Sands, Esq. on July 25, 2006, 07:01:16 AM
the internet librarian hard at work I see

whatever hater!  I enjoy reading some of these articles, but oftentimes miss them because of where they're posted.  You're just mad because I created it before you could....Sir Mod   :P

EDIT: Aight, just so you don't feel left out you can search all of BLSD and move any article ever posted onto this thread.  :D

No thank you.  :)  Do you know how many articles have been posted on this site over the last 2 years?  Talk about mission impossible!
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: crazy8 on July 25, 2006, 07:02:48 AM
the internet librarian hard at work I see

whatever hater!  I enjoy reading some of these articles, but oftentimes miss them because of where they're posted.  You're just mad because I created it before you could....Sir Mod   :P

EDIT: Aight, just so you don't feel left out you can search all of BLSD and move any article ever posted onto this thread.  :D

No thank you.  :)  Do you know how many articles have been posted on this site over the last 2 years?  Talk about mission impossible!

I know
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on July 25, 2006, 07:04:07 AM
How the heck are you going to have presidential appointees hiring attorneys for this job? 

Although I'm not defending the practice, I do think that it is his prerogative, since DOJ is an executive agency.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: crazy8 on July 25, 2006, 07:09:31 AM
How the heck are you going to have presidential appointees hiring attorneys for this job? 

Although I'm not defending the practice, I do think that it is his prerogative, since DOJ is an executive agency.

Yes, but where does one issue discretion?  Though someone has a right to do something, it doesn't mean that it should be done (I know you're not defending it).  It's not so much having the appointees do the hiring, as it is who they have decided to hire (and I'm sure he knew this would happen).  How can you have less than half of a staff of attorneys who work in a certain division of the DOJ have no experience in the area?  Because it doesn't matter if they have experience, as long as they hold right wing views, they're alright with Dubya.

I don't know why I'm getting so worked up....back to jammin to MJB.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on July 25, 2006, 07:13:19 AM
Yeah, but there are state and local police and attorneys to handle things too.  I think we depend too much on the national government.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: crazy8 on July 25, 2006, 07:18:15 AM
Yeah, but there are state and local police and attorneys to handle things too.  I think we depend too much on the national government.

I'm not ignoring state and local attorneys.  But if you're going to have a specific division in the DOJ that handles certain types of cases, you would think that the attorneys they hire would have experience in those types of cases.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on July 25, 2006, 07:19:14 AM
Lol.  True.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: crazy8 on July 25, 2006, 07:23:41 AM
Lol.  True.

Alci, I know you're rubbing shoulders in there with them, so I understand your inability to speak out.  Therefore, I will speak out on your behalf!  :D ;D
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: 2Lacoste on July 25, 2006, 07:26:09 AM
Experience or not, if you're qualified, you're qualified.  So he picks people with no experience in the particular field -- most of the top Bush lawyers I've heard about in the news and met in person have been immensely qualified (conservative) individuals.  They can get the job done.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: crazy8 on July 25, 2006, 07:31:31 AM
Experience or not, if you're qualified, you're qualified.  So he picks people with no experience in the particular field -- most of the top Bush lawyers I've heard about in the news and met in person have been immensely qualified (conservative) individuals.  They can get the job done.

What makes you qualified?  Are you telling me that all of a sudden, he can't find any "qualified" people with experience?  How come that wasn't the case before?  How come these attorneys though not qualified, all hold very right-wing opinions?
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: mivida2k on July 25, 2006, 07:32:34 AM
Experience or not, if you're qualified, you're qualified.  So he picks people with no experience in the particular field -- most of the top Bush lawyers I've heard about in the news and met in person have been immensely qualified (conservative) individuals.  They can get the job done.

Lacoste what is your opinion on Ward Connerly and Clarence Thomas.  
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: 2Lacoste on July 25, 2006, 07:34:33 AM
Experience or not, if you're qualified, you're qualified.  So he picks people with no experience in the particular field -- most of the top Bush lawyers I've heard about in the news and met in person have been immensely qualified (conservative) individuals.  They can get the job done.

What makes you qualified?  Are you telling me that all of a sudden, he can't find any "qualified" people with experience?  How come that wasn't the case before?  How come these attorneys though not qualified, all hold very right-wing opinions?



Um, how are they not qualified?  Just because they don't have prior experience?  If that's the criteria then shoot -- how will any of us receive a job (especially a gov't job) coming fresh out of law school?  Most of these lawyers are well established professionals from the private/business sector.  Many are partners at top firms.  Just because they hold right-wing opinions does not make them unqualified, despite your lack of enthusiasm about their party affiliation.  And, as Alci said, it's the President's prerogative.  Don't like it?  Vote him out.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: faith2005 on July 25, 2006, 07:47:28 AM
i posted this yesterday. usually people have been posting articles on the main board. I've continued to do that, even though most of the time someone posts the same article in a separate thread the next day. just like this one.

in the past it wasn't the president's prerogative. as a matter of fact, civil service posts used to be insulated from the president b/c of the worry that he would try to grab power. All of this presidential oversight is new. I don't think hiring someone without experience in Anti-trust makes sense for the DOJ anti-trust division. Similarly, if you don't have any civil rights experience, you shouldn't be hired for the civil rights division. He has probably put up some conservative civil rights attys and thats all well and good--but people who are partners in private firms don't have the relevant experience and what he's trying to do is stop complaints from being filed. I personally can't understand a black person who doesn't think that civil rights attys are important. perhaps segregated schools in north carolina should be re-instated. 
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: crazy8 on July 25, 2006, 07:52:58 AM
i posted this yesterday. usually people have been posting articles on the main board. I've continued to do that, even though most of the time someone posts the same article in a separate thread the next day. just like this one.

in the past it wasn't the president's prerogative. as a matter of fact, civil service posts used to be insulated from the president b/c of the worry that he would try to grab power. All of this presidential oversight is new. I don't think hiring someone without experience in Anti-trust makes sense for the DOJ anti-trust division. Similarly, if you don't have any civil rights experience, you shouldn't be hired for the civil rights division. He has probably put up some conservative civil rights attys and thats all well and good--but people who are partners in private firms don't have the relevant experience and what he's trying to do is stop complaints from being filed. I personally can't understand a black person who doesn't think that civil rights attys are important. perhaps segregated schools in north carolina should be re-instated. 

Exactly Faith....Lacoste, it may have been okay if he were hiring attorneys fresh out of law school. But if you're going to hire a seasoned attorney, shouldn't he be seasoned in the area you are hiring him for?

What scares me is the complacent attitude that some of us seem to have.  Instead of calling Bush out on his outlandish behavior, we try to play devil's advocates and "see where he might be coming from"  Hell no!  By the time we're done doing that, his actions will start to affect us, and then maybe we'll stop being so indifferent about it!
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: faith2005 on July 25, 2006, 08:02:57 AM
they're not complacent. they just agree with him. the growing conservatism in the black community is apart of the overall trend. the thing that makes me sad is that we as black people are digging our own graves and we don't even know or if we know, we don't care. its like that quote about the holocaust--when they came for me, there was no one left to protest...
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: mivida2k on July 25, 2006, 08:03:52 AM
Lacoste most government agencies will only hire a recent law school grad through one of their intern/associate programs.

Would you want someone who had no experience in economics or finances/accounting handling your investments? Would you want someone who only had experience baking cakes to build your home?  Probably not.  

Gonzalez and Dubya are systematically shutting down the Civil Rights division and civil liberties.

Faith and MD you have to remember that Lacoste is still in denial, inexperienced and has not entered the real world.  I recall we had a discussion about this 100s of pages ago.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: crazy8 on July 25, 2006, 08:06:34 AM
They came first for the Communists..
but I didn't speak up because I wasn't a Communist.
Then they came for the Jews...
but I didn't speak up because I wasn't a Jew.
Then they came for the Unionists...
but I didn't speak up because I wasn't a Unionist.
Then they came for the Catholic...
but I didn't speak up because I was a Protestant.
Then they came for me...
and by that time...
there was no-one left to speak up for me.

Rev. Martin Niemoller
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: 2Lacoste on July 25, 2006, 09:49:26 AM
perhaps segregated schools in north carolina should be re-instated. 



Ha.  Thanks for the personal slight.  That's like saying anti-Iraq war folks (myself included) think perhaps Saddam should have gassed more children in Kurdish regions.  Doesn't work that way.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: AshyLarry on July 25, 2006, 09:58:40 AM
SYDNEY, Australia - A driver stranded on a remote stretch of Australian highway Wednesday tried to summon help by playing dead in the middle of the road, a police officer said.

A woman who was driving with her two children spotted the man and had to swerve to avoid hitting him, said Doug Backhouse, a detective with the Western Australia state police.

"She drove around the body — which didn't move at all — and got to the nearest phone," Backhouse said.

Local police arrived with an ambulance and found the man alive and well, but with car troubles.

"The best way he thought to get a vehicle to stop was to lay down in the middle of the road and pretend to be dead," Backhouse said, adding that the man didn't think anyone would stop if he were standing up.

Police said they told the man that lying in the road was "a stupid thing to do" but didn't charge him with any offense.

The incident occurred near Esperance, about 450 miles southeast of the state capital, Perth.

© 2006 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: pikey on July 25, 2006, 10:10:33 AM
NICOSIA (Reuters) - An England football jersey gave away a Senegalese man attempting to enter Cyprus on a forged French passport, police on the Mediterranean island said on Monday.

Suspicions were aroused when the man appeared at a checkpoint supervising crossings from the Turkish Cypriot north to the Greek Cypriot south of the divided island, wearing the England shirt and presenting a French passport.

"Being a football fan, the officer found it highly unlikely that a Frenchman would want to wear an England football jersey," a police source said.

"That was his first suspicion prior to the proper check on the passport, which turned out to be a fake," said the source.

The 22-year-old man, who has not been charged, was remanded in custody for six days pending further inquiries.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: BrerAnansi on July 25, 2006, 10:19:44 AM
He Who Cast the First Stone Probably Didn’t

By DANIEL GILBERT
Published: July 24, 2006

LONG before seat belts or common sense were particularly widespread, my family made annual trips to New York in our 1963 Valiant station wagon. Mom and Dad took the front seat, my infant sister sat in my mother’s lap and my brother and I had what we called “the wayback” all to ourselves.
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In the wayback, we’d lounge around doing puzzles, reading comics and counting license plates. Eventually we’d fight. When our fight had finally escalated to the point of tears, our mother would turn around to chastise us, and my brother and I would start to plead our cases. “But he hit me first,” one of us would say, to which the other would inevitably add, “But he hit me harder.”

It turns out that my brother and I were not alone in believing that these two claims can get a puncher off the hook. In virtually every human society, “He hit me first” provides an acceptable rationale for doing that which is otherwise forbidden. Both civil and religious law provide long lists of behaviors that are illegal or immoral — unless they are responses in kind, in which case they are perfectly fine.

After all, it is wrong to punch anyone except a puncher, and our language even has special words — like “retaliation” and “retribution” and “revenge” — whose common prefix is meant to remind us that a punch thrown second is legally and morally different than a punch thrown first.

That’s why participants in every one of the globe’s intractable conflicts — from Ireland to the Middle East — offer the even-numberedness of their punches as grounds for exculpation.

The problem with the principle of even-numberedness is that people count differently. Every action has a cause and a consequence: something that led to it and something that followed from it. But research shows that while people think of their own actions as the consequences of what came before, they think of other people’s actions as the causes of what came later.

In a study conducted by William Swann and colleagues at the University of Texas, pairs of volunteers played the roles of world leaders who were trying to decide whether to initiate a nuclear strike. The first volunteer was asked to make an opening statement, the second volunteer was asked to respond, the first volunteer was asked to respond to the second, and so on. At the end of the conversation, the volunteers were shown several of the statements that had been made and were asked to recall what had been said just before and just after each of them.

The results revealed an intriguing asymmetry: When volunteers were shown one of their own statements, they naturally remembered what had led them to say it. But when they were shown one of their conversation partner’s statements, they naturally remembered how they had responded to it. In other words, volunteers remembered the causes of their own statements and the consequences of their partner’s statements.

What seems like a grossly self-serving pattern of remembering is actually the product of two innocent facts. First, because our senses point outward, we can observe other people’s actions but not our own. Second, because mental life is a private affair, we can observe our own thoughts but not the thoughts of others. Together, these facts suggest that our reasons for punching will always be more salient to us than the punches themselves — but that the opposite will be true of other people’s reasons and other people’s punches.

Examples aren’t hard to come by. Shiites seek revenge on Sunnis for the revenge they sought on Shiites; Irish Catholics retaliate against the Protestants who retaliated against them; and since 1948, it’s hard to think of any partisan in the Middle East who has done anything but play defense. In each of these instances, people on one side claim that they are merely responding to provocation and dismiss the other side’s identical claim as disingenuous spin. But research suggests that these claims reflect genuinely different perceptions of the same bloody conversation.

If the first principle of legitimate punching is that punches must be even-numbered, the second principle is that an even-numbered punch may be no more forceful than the odd-numbered punch that preceded it. Legitimate retribution is meant to restore balance, and thus an eye for an eye is fair, but an eye for an eyelash is not. When the European Union condemned Israel for bombing Lebanon in retaliation for the kidnapping of two Israeli soldiers, it did not question Israel’s right to respond, but rather, its “disproportionate use of force.” It is O.K. to hit back, just not too hard.

Research shows that people have as much trouble applying the second principle as the first. In a study conducted by Sukhwinder Shergill and colleagues at University College London, pairs of volunteers were hooked up to a mechanical device that allowed each of them to exert pressure on the other volunteer’s fingers.

The researcher began the game by exerting a fixed amount of pressure on the first volunteer’s finger. The first volunteer was then asked to exert precisely the same amount of pressure on the second volunteer’s finger. The second volunteer was then asked to exert the same amount of pressure on the first volunteer’s finger. And so on. The two volunteers took turns applying equal amounts of pressure to each other’s fingers while the researchers measured the actual amount of pressure they applied.

The results were striking. Although volunteers tried to respond to each other’s touches with equal force, they typically responded with about 40 percent more force than they had just experienced. Each time a volunteer was touched, he touched back harder, which led the other volunteer to touch back even harder. What began as a game of soft touches quickly became a game of moderate pokes and then hard prods, even though both volunteers were doing their level best to respond in kind.

Each volunteer was convinced that he was responding with equal force and that for some reason the other volunteer was escalating. Neither realized that the escalation was the natural byproduct of a neurological quirk that causes the pain we receive to seem more painful than the pain we produce, so we usually give more pain than we have received.

Research teaches us that our reasons and our pains are more palpable, more obvious and real, than are the reasons and pains of others. This leads to the escalation of mutual harm, to the illusion that others are solely responsible for it and to the belief that our actions are justifiable responses to theirs.

None of this is to deny the roles that hatred, intolerance, avarice and deceit play in human conflict. It is simply to say that basic principles of human psychology are important ingredients in this miserable stew. Until we learn to stop trusting everything our brains tell us about others — and to start trusting others themselves — there will continue to be tears and recriminations in the wayback.

Daniel Gilbert, a professor of psychology at Harvard, is the author of “Stumbling on Happiness.”
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on July 25, 2006, 10:29:36 AM
"Being a football fan, the officer found it highly unlikely that a Frenchman would want to wear an England football jersey," a police source said.

Lol
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: _BP_ on July 25, 2006, 10:54:58 AM
i posted this yesterday. usually people have been posting articles on the main board. I've continued to do that, even though most of the time someone posts the same article in a separate thread the next day. just like this one.

in the past it wasn't the president's prerogative. as a matter of fact, civil service posts used to be insulated from the president b/c of the worry that he would try to grab power. All of this presidential oversight is new. I don't think hiring someone without experience in Anti-trust makes sense for the DOJ anti-trust division. Similarly, if you don't have any civil rights experience, you shouldn't be hired for the civil rights division. He has probably put up some conservative civil rights attys and thats all well and good--but people who are partners in private firms don't have the relevant experience and what he's trying to do is stop complaints from being filed. I personally can't understand a black person who doesn't think that civil rights attys are important. perhaps segregated schools in north carolina should be re-instated. 

Exactly Faith....Lacoste, it may have been okay if he were hiring attorneys fresh out of law school. But if you're going to hire a seasoned attorney, shouldn't he be seasoned in the area you are hiring him for?

What scares me is the complacent attitude that some of us seem to have.  Instead of calling Bush out on his outlandish behavior, we try to play devil's advocates and "see where he might be coming from"  Hell no!  By the time we're done doing that, his actions will start to affect us, and then maybe we'll stop being so indifferent about it!
[/b]
Mdlaw, I'm making this my new sig ;)
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: crazy8 on July 25, 2006, 11:05:47 AM
i posted this yesterday. usually people have been posting articles on the main board. I've continued to do that, even though most of the time someone posts the same article in a separate thread the next day. just like this one.

in the past it wasn't the president's prerogative. as a matter of fact, civil service posts used to be insulated from the president b/c of the worry that he would try to grab power. All of this presidential oversight is new. I don't think hiring someone without experience in Anti-trust makes sense for the DOJ anti-trust division. Similarly, if you don't have any civil rights experience, you shouldn't be hired for the civil rights division. He has probably put up some conservative civil rights attys and thats all well and good--but people who are partners in private firms don't have the relevant experience and what he's trying to do is stop complaints from being filed. I personally can't understand a black person who doesn't think that civil rights attys are important. perhaps segregated schools in north carolina should be re-instated. 

Exactly Faith....Lacoste, it may have been okay if he were hiring attorneys fresh out of law school. But if you're going to hire a seasoned attorney, shouldn't he be seasoned in the area you are hiring him for?

What scares me is the complacent attitude that some of us seem to have.  Instead of calling Bush out on his outlandish behavior, we try to play devil's advocates and "see where he might be coming from"  Hell no!  By the time we're done doing that, his actions will start to affect us, and then maybe we'll stop being so indifferent about it!
[/b]
Mdlaw, I'm making this my new sig ;)

Wow BP I'm honored!  I actually made your signature  :o  Forget law school, I'm set!
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: crazy8 on July 25, 2006, 11:24:37 AM
SYDNEY, Australia - A driver stranded on a remote stretch of Australian highway Wednesday tried to summon help by playing dead in the middle of the road, a police officer said.

A woman who was driving with her two children spotted the man and had to swerve to avoid hitting him, said Doug Backhouse, a detective with the Western Australia state police.

"She drove around the body — which didn't move at all — and got to the nearest phone," Backhouse said.

Local police arrived with an ambulance and found the man alive and well, but with car troubles.

"The best way he thought to get a vehicle to stop was to lay down in the middle of the road and pretend to be dead," Backhouse said, adding that the man didn't think anyone would stop if he were standing up.

Police said they told the man that lying in the road was "a stupid thing to do" but didn't charge him with any offense.

The incident occurred near Esperance, about 450 miles southeast of the state capital, Perth.

© 2006 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


The man was pro'ly black  :D
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: _BP_ on July 25, 2006, 11:26:07 AM
Faith I agree with you about black people digging their own graves, supporting a gang of morally bankrupt people who have hijacked the country. At every step of the way they undermine the system they were entrusted to protect.

There isn’t enough support for repealing the estate tax?  Let’s get rid of the IRS agents who are in change of enforcing it. Slick...

There is a law against Domestic spying sans a warrant?  We can find a way to beat that too.

There are conventions against torture?  Let’s come up with ways to get around this.  If that fails, let’s ship people to other countries and outsource our torture.

We'll always have some bright young lawyer to interpret the statutes in a way that will make this work. What's next on our list?
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: mivida2k on July 25, 2006, 11:31:44 AM
Congress sure does move when they want to.  I don't remember them moving so quickly after Katrina.  (praying that Kanye doesn't read this article)

WASHINGTON - The House voted Tuesday to add money to a federal repatriation program and ensure that 8,000 to 15,000 Americans fleeing Lebanon have lodging, medical care and transportation.    

The Health and Human Services Department expects to reach the program's $1 million cap this week.

"We need your assistance in lifting this cap as soon as possible," Secretary Michael Leavitt wrote to House Speaker       
Dennis Hastert, R-Ill. "Arriving U.S. citizens who are exhausted and without financial means will be left to fend for themselves upon arrival in their home country."

The government provides temporary assistance to citizens and their families when they arrive in the United States after fleeing foreign countries due to destitution, illness, threat of war, invasion or other crises.

Repatriation centers have opened at Baltimore's and Philadelphia's airports to assist Americans returning from Lebanon. They are staffed by medical and mental health professionals, and they have phone banks and computers to help people contact friends and relatives.

The House bill, passed by voice vote, temporarily lifts the program's $1 million cap to keep assistance flowing to the 8,000 to 15,000 Americans expected to leave Lebanon.

"Many don't need much help, but some do," said Rep. Jim McDermott (news, bio, voting record), D-Wash, and the program "enables us to help Americans who escaped a conflict with their lives but little else."

The program provides aid for up to 90 days.

It is designed to help get people to their homes or other destinations as smoothly as possible. In the majority of cases, evacuees don't need much assistance, and they pay their own way for their lodging or for the airplane tickets.

In some cases, people fled without money or credit cards to pay for immediate needs. The government can provide money, medical care, lodging or transportation in those cases, and evacuees getting assistance promise to repay the money.

In a small number of cases, when a citizen is truly destitute, the government will pay the expenses for getting them to their final destination. The program also repays states for any assistance they provide to repatriating Americans.

___

Information about the bill, H.R. 5865, can be found at http://thomas.loc.gov/.

Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: crazy8 on July 25, 2006, 11:56:03 AM
Please, they're just trying to make up for the fact that they didn't give a damn about what happened to these people as they watched their European friends get shipped out without a glitch.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: crazy8 on July 25, 2006, 12:12:29 PM
Paraphrasing Uncle Ben (from Spiderman): With Great Knowledge Comes Greater Responsibility

A black man with credentials that some would die for and this is the way he chooses to use it?

Epithet 'Has Many Meanings,' a Harvard Professor Testifies
 
By COREY KILGANNON
Published: June 8, 2006

The witnesses in the trial of a white man accused of a racially motivated beating of a black man in Howard Beach last summer had been typical for an assault case in Queens. Until yesterday.

Nicholas Minucci, in shirtsleeves, at the table with his lawyer, Albert Gaudelli, Wednesday in State Supreme Court in Kew Gardens, Queens.
All of the previous witnesses — the hardened detective, the newsstand owner, the pizza maker, the career criminal and other assorted neighborhood characters — had offered plain-spoken testimony about Nicholas Minucci, 20, who is charged with using a racial epithet while attacking Glenn Moore with a baseball bat on June 29, 2005.

But the final witness for Mr. Minucci was a stranger to him, to Howard Beach and to the State Supreme Court in Kew Gardens, Queens. The defense got the Harvard Law School professor Randall Kennedy to travel from Boston to testify about the current usage of the racial epithet, sometimes referred to in court as the "n" word.

The epithet has become central to the trial, as a measure of whether Mr. Minucci attacked Mr. Moore because of his skin color. Several witnesses have testified that Mr. Minucci repeatedly spewed the epithet in anger while chasing Mr. Moore and beating him on the head. Mr. Minucci insists that Mr. Moore was about to commit a robbery and that he used the word as a form of benign address before subduing him with a few swats to the side and legs.

Mr. Minucci's lawyer, Albert Gaudelli, said he hoped Professor Kennedy's testimony would convince the jury that the mere use of the epithet did not constitute racism. On the stand yesterday, Professor Kennedy's explanation of the modern usage of the word seemed to support Mr. Gaudelli's claim.

"The word is a complex word," he testified. "It has many meanings."

Professor Kennedy had just taken the stand in a packed courtroom and rattled off his impressive credentials — which include attending Princeton, Oxford and Yale, a clerkship for Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall and his membership in the Bar of the Supreme Court.

He said the epithet was "a word that can be put to many different uses," ranging from a pejorative term to a friendly salutation.

Mr. Gaudelli asked Professor Kennedy, who is black, about his book on the subject.

"My second book is entitled, 'n-word: The Strange Career of a Troublesome Word,' " the professor responded. Mr. Gaudelli handed him a copy of the book, and had it entered into the case as Exhibit W.

Professor Kennedy said that in modern parlance, the word could have many different meanings and was no longer restricted to use by or about black people. In fact, he said, many new immigrants use the word casually after learning it from movies, music videos and popular songs. In San Francisco, he said, the word is commonly used among young Asian immigrants.

"It is used by all sorts of people, black and white, and other groups as well," he said.

Later, outside the court, Professor Kennedy said it was the first time he had testified in a criminal trial about the use of the word. He said he had agreed to come to Queens to testify "to advance the aims of justice," but not to take Mr. Minucci's side.

"I do not feel I was championing somebody's cause," he said. "I was asked to speak as an expert witness about a particular issue. Somebody's liberties are at stake here."

Mr. Gaudelli said that when he phoned Professor Kennedy and asked him to testify, for no fee, the professor initially declined. But Mr. Gaudelli persisted.

"I said: 'Do you believe what you wrote? Are you willing to stand by it?' Do you want to deprive my client of a fair trial?' " Mr. Gaudelli recounted. "He said, 'I'll call you in the morning.' "

Asked how the testimony went, Mr. Gaudelli said: "I think I did good; I got a Rhodes scholar to testify for nothing and all I had to do is drive him to the airport."--Interpreted..."I think I did good; I got a smart a$$ black man (who is even smarter than me) to come to court and do something insanely stupid.  And I didn't even have to pay him for it."

Early on, Professor Kennedy said the epithet, which dates to the 17th century, derived its name from the Latin niger, meaning black. It "seeped into English" through Spanish and Portuguese, he said.

In the cross-examination, Mariela Herring, a Queens prosecutor, asked Mr. Kennedy, "Are you here to tell us the "n" word is no longer a derogatory term?" She then asked more directly, "Is it a derogatory term?" Professor Kennedy responded, "It can be."

She asked Professor Kennedy if he had chosen the title of his book, published in 2002, for "shock value," and she cited a newspaper interview in which he said the "catchy title" would grab attention.

Professor Kennedy said the meaning of the epithet depended on the context in which it was used. Ms. Herring asked him to assume that the context was a white man wielding a baseball bat, about to attack a black man. Justice Richard L. Buchter disallowed the question, saying Professor Kennedy could not conjecture as to what the attacker would be thinking.

Justice Buchter also denied Mr. Gaudelli's attempt to enter a chapter of Professor Kennedy's book — "The Use of the Word Today" — as evidence, for the jury to consult.

Mr. Gaudelli maintains that Mr. Minucci, growing up in Lindenwood, a racially diverse neighborhood adjacent to Howard Beach, grew up with many nonwhite friends and used the term as part of his regular vocabulary.

The lawyer insists that his client, encountering a black man carrying a bag of tools at 3 a.m. in a middle-class white neighborhood, decided that Mr. Moore was about to commit a robbery and decided to use "reasonable force" to stop him. Mr. Moore has admitted that he and his friends intended to steal a car that night.

During yesterday's proceedings, Mr. Minucci responded to a question from the judge by saying that he would not take the stand. Five of the 19 counts against Mr. Minucci were eliminated, to streamline and simplify the indictment.

Both sides are to give their closing arguments today, and the judge is expected to give the case to the jury in the afternoon.

Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: 2Lacoste on July 25, 2006, 12:21:04 PM
Bush Sends Kerry to Solve Israel-Hezbollah War

After learning that the battle between Israel and Hezbollah could have been prevented if Sen. John Kerry, D-MA, had been the U.S. Commander in Chief, President George Bush today dispatched Sen. Kerry to the war-torn region to “get this thing solved.”

Sen. Kerry, a career Vietnam veteran, who told a political gathering in Detroit yesterday that “we must destroy Hezbollah” and that the president “has been absent on diplomacy“, said he would bring his own brand of “diplomatic destruction” to the terrorist group.

“Senator Kerry’s presence and intellect alone should bring a swift end to hostilities,” said Mr. Bush, who admitted that he, and the State Department, had “kind of put the Middle East thing on the back burner” while following televised coverage of the Tour de France bicycle race.

In related news, as hostilities along the Lebanon border approached the two-week mark, the crisis was officially added to the list of “bad things that would not have happened during a John Kerry presidency.”

 ;D :D ;)
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: crazy8 on July 25, 2006, 12:24:38 PM
Bush Sends Kerry to Solve Israel-Hezbollah War

After learning that the battle between Israel and Hezbollah could have been prevented if Sen. John Kerry, D-MA, had been the U.S. Commander in Chief, President George Bush today dispatched Sen. Kerry to the war-torn region to “get this thing solved.”

Sen. Kerry, a career Vietnam veteran, who told a political gathering in Detroit yesterday that “we must destroy Hezbollah” and that the president “has been absent on diplomacy“, said he would bring his own brand of “diplomatic destruction” to the terrorist group.

“Senator Kerry’s presence and intellect alone should bring a swift end to hostilities,” said Mr. Bush, who admitted that he, and the State Department, had “kind of put the Middle East thing on the back burner” while following televised coverage of the Tour de France bicycle race.

In related news, as hostilities along the Lebanon border approached the two-week mark, the crisis was officially added to the list of “bad things that would not have happened during a John Kerry presidency.”

 ;D :D ;)

Who wrote this?  Lacoste here's a good way to practice your bluebooking....quoted text always needs a cite  ;)
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: 2Lacoste on July 25, 2006, 12:26:53 PM
 ::)  I didn't write it.  I'm not that funny.   ;)
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: crazy8 on July 25, 2006, 12:29:01 PM
::)  I didn't write it.  I'm not that funny.   ;)

I figured you didn't write it, that's why I mentioned it being cited?  Where is it from, it's funny?
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: 2Lacoste on July 25, 2006, 12:33:01 PM
www.scrappleface.com
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: crazy8 on July 25, 2006, 02:11:13 PM
So as to show I'm not biased, I'm completely disturbed about this:

New York Daily News - http://www.nydailynews.com
Hil, Rupert sly as Fox at fund-raiser
BY HELEN KENNEDY
DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITER
Tuesday, July 18th, 2006

Two of the most public people in the world had a chummy breakfast yesterday, but media mogul Rupert Murdoch and Sen. Hillary Clinton (D-N.Y.) tried to keep their political get-together as secret as possible.
There were no Fox News cameras to record the odd couple breaking bread together at Murdoch's News Corp. headquarters in midtown, where, after years of attacking her, the conservative Murdoch hosted a fund-raiser for Clinton's Democratic Senate campaign.

The campaign refused to even confirm the time or location of the controversial fund-raiser. No estimate of the take or number of people who attended was released.

New York's junior senator did not make an appearance on "Fox and Friends" on her way out of the building just after 10a.m. She didn't even go through the News Corp. lobby, slipping out a side door onto W.48th St., where the CBS show "Without a Trace" was filming up the block.

Fans of Clinton and Murdoch were shocked and upset when the fund-raiser was announced, and the senator and the mogul have since sought to downplay the event.

Murdoch insists he is stuffing more cash into Clinton's overflowing coffers simply because she's an effective senator.

After hosting Clinton, Murdoch was expected a few blocks north at a Republican Senate campaign fund-raising luncheon featuring Clinton's rival in the 2008 presidential opinion polls, Arizona Sen. John McCain.

Asked whether Murdoch was playing both sides of the street, McCain said with a smile, "He's a great American."

Former Sen. Al D'Amato, who hosted the GOP fund-raiser, said the Clinton-Murdoch coziness was just good business. "She's a force to be reckoned with and if you're in the business community, you have to understand that," he said.
 
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: 2Lacoste on July 25, 2006, 02:12:48 PM
Heard rumblings regarding this relationship a month or two ago.  Surprising in a way, but also not.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: faith2005 on July 25, 2006, 02:15:05 PM
maybe support of Israel is the missing link here.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: crazy8 on July 25, 2006, 02:17:32 PM
Yea, talk about them have been going on since last year.  But it seems like it's becoming more serious since she's taking money from him.  I'm starting to think Hil would like to cross over to the Republican side.  Surprisingly I think she would get less flack if she were Republican.  I mean, she aligns herself with some of their views but also finds herself in the middle when it comes to others.

maybe support of Israel is the missing link here.

Nope because of what I said above....they've been chummy for a min.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: crazy8 on July 25, 2006, 02:19:08 PM
By the NewsMax.com Staff 
For the story behind the story... 


Wednesday, June 15, 2005 11:15 p.m. EDT
Rupert Murdoch and Hillary Clinton: New Odd Couple

Is there a political romance brewing between two of the most powerful players on the opposite sides of the national scene, asked the New York Observer as it contemplated the friendly relationship between New York Senator Hillary Clinton and media mogul Rupert Murdoch.


The Observer's Ben Smith writes that the possibility of an alliance between "two of the most powerful and guarded figures in the world — is beginning to whet the appetites of the chattering classes."

Though not yet cooing at each other, Hillary and Rupert are speaking softly.

"Senator Clinton respects him and thinks he is smart and effective," Philippe Reines, a spokesman for Mrs. Clinton, told the Observer.


"Rupert has respect for her political skills and for the hard work that she's done as a Senator," Gary Ginsberg, an executive vice president at Murdoch's News Corp., confided to Smith.


Adding smoke to the glowing embers of gossip surrounding the two is the softer tone the usually anti-Hillary New York Post has adopted toward her, along with Murdoch's retaining of Hillary adviser Howard Wolfson.


Murdoch's News Corp. hired Wolfson's s firm, the Glover Park Group, to run an ultimately unsuccessful campaign against a change in the Nielsen ratings system sought by the Fox television network.


Smith notes: "The Post's feared gossip page, Page Six, has been a regular outlet for rumors about Bill Clinton's private life and for unflattering tidbits about both Clintons. But last week the page landed a solid blow against the anti-Clinton right, eviscerating journalist Ed Klein's new book, 'The Truth About Hillary', in a well-reported item that tracked down two women whom Mr. Klein suggested had had affairs with Mrs. Clinton. Page Six dismissed the rumor."

According to Hillary's White House chief ideological officer, Sidney Blumenthal, "The Page Six trashing of Ed Klein's wretched little piece of sewage was a very interesting article. We won't know for a while whether or not it was assigned, but it appears that [Page Six] sought the story."


Other signs of a pending political union between the two:


A reportedly "cordial" 2002 lunch between Murdoch and the senator at News Corp.'s private dining room at its Rockefeller Center headquarters.

Bill Clinton's "energetic" courting of Murdoch and his son, Lachlan, who runs the Post. Clinton toured the Post's newsroom in January 2003. Smith reported that Bill Clinton has lunched alone with the senior Murdoch, and this June he delivered a recorded tribute at the birthday party of the former Republican operative who runs Fox News, Roger Ailes.

"I know ... you're thinking somebody put the wrong video in the machine," he reportedly began. "I am especially grateful that Roger didn't work in the 1992 campaign. I mean, who knows how different history would have been if he had. I would have been spared all of his barbs in his later life as a media mogul, but I wouldn't have had the chance to be president."


Then there is Hillary's sudden propensity to hook up with such former foes as South Carolina Senator Lindsey Graham, who managed the House's impeachment trial of her husband, and even Newt Gingrich.


Murdoch's reported willingness to cozy up to Hillary has failed to surprise those familiar with the international media baron.

Speaking of a potential alliance between the two opposites, Nicholas Wapshott, the longtime New York bureau chief for Murdoch's Times of London, told Smith: "It makes perfect sense. Although Rupert is widely assumed to be an ideological creature solely of the right, the fact is that he's a businessman before he is an ideologist, and he likes to be with a winner."

"They're both probably about as canny as each other, and they're about as inscrutable as each other," Wapshott, who was at The Times of London when Murdoch arrived in 1980, added. "They are very similar – both hard-nosed characters. They would understand each other perfectly. Absolutely perfectly."

Could Murdoch actually endorse Hillary for 2008?

Smith notes that one major obstacle of such a move is Fox News.

The news network, he says, "is the stumbling block to any suggestion that Mr. Murdoch could really pivot toward Mrs. Clinton if she is the Democrats' 2008 nominee. A huge profit center for News Corp., Fox's hostility and suspicion toward Mrs. Clinton is a staple for loyal viewers. In April, the network brought on former Clinton political adviser male private part Morris – a regular commentator on the network – to speculate about what damaging material would emerge from Mr. Klein's dirt-filled biography of Mrs. Clinton."
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Inquirer on July 25, 2006, 02:27:02 PM
Something good for a change...

Alpha Phi Alpha Opens 100th Anniversary Convention in DC
President Darryl R. Matthews, Sr., of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc., announced today that the fraternity will kick off its official 100th anniversary celebration at its national convention in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, July 25, 2006.


Founded on December 4, 1906 by seven distinct men at Cornell University in Ithaca, NY, Alpha Phi Alpha is the first and largest inter-collegiate Greek-letter fraternity established for Black college students.


"Our founders envisioned a day when the leadership of African-American men would become widely-recognized and respected, despite challenges of social and economic inequality," said Matthews. "And since many of our members have had a tremendous impact on the nation's social and economic policies, this made Washington an ideal place to both honor our founders' vision and celebrate 100 years of Alpha Phi Alpha achievements."

Alpha Phi Alpha has not only been influential in the areas of government and business, but also in education, community affairs, sports and entertainment. The fraternity's prominent members include Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., Thurgood Marshall, Charles Rangel, Marc Morial, Kwame Kilpatrick, Art Shell, Lionel Ritchie, the list goes on.


Over the years, Alpha Phi Alpha has lead hundreds of campaigns to uplift the African-American community, including the Million Dollar Campaign to support the NAACP, National Negro College Fund and the National Urban League. The renowned "A Voteless People is a Hopeless People" campaign was the first real organized demonstration to encourage African-Americans to vote. The fraternity's most recent campaign, the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Project, has raised nearly $60 million to date.


Alpha Phi Alphas' over 650 chapters combined have contributed an estimated 650K in scholarships annually.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Inquirer on July 25, 2006, 02:29:21 PM
Teen held as a suspect in Ind. shootings

By CHARLES WILSON, Associated Press Writer


A 17-year-old was arrested Tuesday as a suspect in a series of highway shootings that killed one man, wounded another and damaged at least four vehicles, a prosecutor said.

Zachariah Blanton faced preliminary charges of murder, attempted murder and criminal recklessness, prosecutor Stephen Pierson said.

A judge on Tuesday afternoon said he had found probable cause to issue an arrest warrant for Blanton, who was being held in the Jackson County jail.

Pierson said state police had recovered a rifle they believed was used in the shootings. The two sniper victims were hit early Sunday as they rode in pickup trucks on Interstate 65 near Seymour, south of Indianapolis.

About two hours later, bullets struck a moving tractor-trailer and a parked sport-utility vehicle on I-69 in Delaware County, about 100 miles to the northeast. No one was injured in those shootings.

Authorities considered the shootings linked.

The FBI joined the investigation on Monday as investigators searched fields, overpasses and roads looking for evidence. Detectives from Columbus, Ohio, who helped solve that city's 2003 and 2004 sniper shootings also traveled to Indiana to help.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: crazy8 on July 25, 2006, 02:37:28 PM
Something good for a change...

Alpha Phi Alpha Opens 100th Anniversary Convention in DC
President Darryl R. Matthews, Sr., of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc., announced today that the fraternity will kick off its official 100th anniversary celebration at its national convention in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, July 25, 2006.


Founded on December 4, 1906 by seven distinct men at Cornell University in Ithaca, NY, Alpha Phi Alpha is the first and largest inter-collegiate Greek-letter fraternity established for Black college students.


"Our founders envisioned a day when the leadership of African-American men would become widely-recognized and respected, despite challenges of social and economic inequality," said Matthews. "And since many of our members have had a tremendous impact on the nation's social and economic policies, this made Washington an ideal place to both honor our founders' vision and celebrate 100 years of Alpha Phi Alpha achievements."

Alpha Phi Alpha has not only been influential in the areas of government and business, but also in education, community affairs, sports and entertainment. The fraternity's prominent members include Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., Thurgood Marshall, Charles Rangel, Marc Morial, Kwame Kilpatrick, Art Shell, Lionel Ritchie, the list goes on.


Over the years, Alpha Phi Alpha has lead hundreds of campaigns to uplift the African-American community, including the Million Dollar Campaign to support the NAACP, National Negro College Fund and the National Urban League. The renowned "A Voteless People is a Hopeless People" campaign was the first real organized demonstration to encourage African-Americans to vote. The fraternity's most recent campaign, the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Project, has raised nearly $60 million to date.


Alpha Phi Alphas' over 650 chapters combined have contributed an estimated 650K in scholarships annually.

I think Intent will be in town for this.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Inquirer on July 25, 2006, 02:43:59 PM

I think Intent will be in town for this.

I'm tempted to be in town for that :D  LOL -- j/p
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: faith2005 on July 25, 2006, 03:02:46 PM
my friend in dc told me some girls were talking about it months ago. saying that they'd be going to the after hours events and stuff. lol!

i remember when the kappa convention (is it k(c)onclave?)was in my hometown. one of my girls and i had alot of fun.  :)
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on July 25, 2006, 03:33:08 PM
My g/f wants to go to that...
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on July 25, 2006, 03:43:31 PM
Ingrate:

'Jeopardy' champ Ken Jennings blasts show

1 hour, 22 minutes ago

NEW YORK - "Jeopardy!" ace Ken Jennings, who won $2.5 million during his 74-game winning streak, has a few unkind words to say about the show — and dapper host Alex Trebek.

"I know, I know, the old folks love him," Jennings writes in a recent posting, titled "Dear Jeopardy!" on his Web site.

"Nobody knows he died in that fiery truck crash a few years back and was immediately replaced with the Trebektron 4000 (I see your engineers still can't get the mustache right, by the way)."

Jennings also takes aim at the show's "effete, left-coast" categories and "same-old" format.

"You're like the Dorian Gray of syndication," he says. "You seem to think `change' means replacing a blue polyethylene backdrop with a slightly different shade of blue polyethylene backdrop every presidential election or so."

A call by The Associated Press to "Jeopardy!" spokesman Jeff Ritter was not immediately returned Tuesday.

Jennings, a software engineer from Salt Lake City, snagged 74 wins on "Jeopardy!" in 2004 before he was beaten by challenger Nancy Zerg.

Trebek, 66, has hosted the show since 1984. In a "correction" posted Monday on his Web site, Jennings offers an apology of sorts.

"We regret the insinuation that Mr. Alex Trebek is a robot, and has been since 2004. Mr. Trebek's robotic frame does still contain some organic parts, many harvested from patriotic Canadian schoolchildren, so this technically makes him a `cyborg,' not a `robot.'"

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20060725/ap_en_tv/people_ken_jennings
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Sui generis on July 25, 2006, 05:25:42 PM
Cities Shed Middle Class, And Are Richer and Poorer For It
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/07/23/weekinreview/23scott.html?ei=5070&en=fac99d6da9905976&ex=1154318400&adxnnl=1&emc=eta1&adxnnlx=1153749594-TwZU7HadcIrw6AdGfe0/5A

By JANNY SCOTT

SOME big American cities are flourishing as at no time in recent memory. Places like New York and San Francisco appear to be richer and more dazzling than ever: crime remains low, new arrivals pour in, neighborhoods have risen from the dead. New York is in the throes of the biggest building boom in 30 years, its population at an all-time high and climbing. Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg proudly promotes his city as “a luxury product.”

But middle-class city dwellers across the country are being squeezed.

This time, they are being squeezed out by the rich as much, or more so, as by the poor — a casualty of high housing costs and the thinning out of the country’s once broad economic middle. The percentage of middle-income neighborhoods in metropolitan areas like Los Angeles, Chicago and Washington has dropped since 1970, according to a recent Brookings Institution report.

The percentage of higher-income neighborhoods in many places has gone up. In New York, the supply of apartments considered affordable to households with incomes like those earned by starting firefighters or police officers plunged by a whopping 205,000 in just three years, between 2002 and 2005.

Does it matter if there is less room for a middle class? In strictly economic terms, plenty of economists say, it may not. But they also say that in the long run, those cities may become places where they and other city lovers would prefer not to live.

Obviously, cities benefit economically from the presence of the rich. Tax revenues go up when the rich pour into what some economists now call “superstar cities,” places like New York, San Francisco, San Diego, Boston and Washington that attract highly skilled people but have limits on the ability to build housing. In New York, fewer than 13,000 of the 2.3 million households that pay income tax are expected to account for nearly 30 percent of city income tax paid in 2006.

In the San Francisco Bay Area, the percentage of households earning more than $100,000 a year rose to over 30 percent in 2000 from approximately 7 percent in 1970, said Joseph Gyourko, a professor of real estate and finance at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. “Is that area worse off?” he asked. “At least so far, there’s a lot of evidence that economically they’re better off. Land prices are really high, lots of people want to move there.”

Edward L. Glaeser, a Harvard economist who studied 300 large cities with a range of levels of income inequality in the 1960’s and 1970’s, says he found little evidence that those levels later affected the growth of housing prices, income or population there.

Of course, cities need police officers, firefighters, teachers. But as long as they can get the labor they need from somewhere nearby, some economists say, middle-class shrinkage may not hurt. In Southern California, developers import construction workers from Las Vegas and put them up in hotels; costs go up but rich clients can pay. Firefighters who want to live in high-priced cities can work two jobs, said W. Michael Cox, chief economist for the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas. “I think it’s great,” he said. “It gives you portfolio diversification in your income.” Pay for essential workers like plumbers and cabdrivers will tend to go up, he said.

Professor Glaeser said: “There’s no obvious smoking gun saying cities will be substantially worse off. There’s a whole lot of America that does a very good job of taking care of the middle class. The great sprawling edge cities of the American hinterland provide remarkably cheap housing, fast commutes, decent public services and incredibly cheap products available in big box stores. As a New Yorker, I understand the view that exile from New York is consignment to hell; but that’s not accurate. The majority of middle-class people that have moved out have presumably found themselves better lives out there.”

But sociologists and many economists believe that there can be non-economic consequences for cities that lose a lot of middle-income residents. The disappearance of middle-income neighborhoods can limit opportunities for upward mobility, the authors of the Brookings study said. It becomes harder for lower-income homeowners to move up the property ladder, buy into safer neighborhoods, send their children to better schools and even make the kinds of personal contacts that can be a route to better jobs. The Brookings study, which defined moderate-income families as those with incomes between 80 and 120 percent of the median for each area, found that the percentage of middle-income neighborhoods in the 100 largest metropolitan areas had dropped to 41 percent from 58 percent between 1970 and 2000. Only 23 percent of central city neighborhoods in 12 large metropolitan areas were middle income, down from 45 percent in 1970.

Meanwhile, New York University researchers reported last month that the number of apartments affordable to households making 80 percent of the median household income in New York City dropped by a fifth between 2002 and 2005. Nationally, median household income ranges from just above $20,000 in Miami to around $40,000 in New York and Boston and about $60,000 in San Francisco.

With a dwindling middle class, rich and poor become more separate. Alan Berube, an author of the Brookings study, said a two-tiered marketplace can develop: Whole Foods for the upper classes, bodegas for the lower, with no competition from stores courting the middle. “If the two models are check cashers on the one hand and major national financial institutions on the other, who’s thinking about how to hold down costs for the basic consumer?” he asked.

School systems may suffer, too. While some upper-middle-class families rely on the public schools, many that can afford private-school education opt out. Urban school systems tend to be dominated by middle- and lower-income families. Middle-income parents have the ability and leverage to demand improvements. Similarly, studies show that lower-income students benefit by being in economically mixed schools.

Politics can become polarized without the moderating force of an engaged middle, sociologists and economists said. And while cities can import middle-level workers, there is a cost in productivity, family time and other intangibles.

“People have a stake in the place that they’re living in,” said Chris Mayer, a professor at Columbia Business School. “If you have a police and firefighting force saving their city as opposed to somebody else’s city, it makes a difference. In the same sense, local shopkeepers just seem to be better. What happened on 9/11 was really about ‘our city.’ ”

Mr. Mayer, who recently moved with his wife and three young children to New York, said he believed that it was important for children to grow up in a place that is racially, ethnically and economically diverse. He calls those places more vibrant. In most places, the upper middle class is less diverse than the middle, he said. New York would be less attractive to him without its still-expansive and lively middle.

“This trend toward living and interacting with people who are like you is intensifying a lot,” said Professor Gyourko, who lives in the affluent suburb of Swarthmore, Pa. “I do not meet the full range of incomes and social classes within my neighborhood. Well, think about what happens if metropolitan areas like New York, San Francisco and the like turn into my suburb. You’ll have even less interaction. The most interesting and potentially foreboding implication of this sorting is that it changes the way we view life.”

Copyright 2006 The New York Times Company

Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: AshyLarry on July 25, 2006, 05:39:43 PM
Ingrate:

'Jeopardy' champ Ken Jennings blasts show

1 hour, 22 minutes ago

NEW YORK - "Jeopardy!" ace Ken Jennings, who won $2.5 million during his 74-game winning streak, has a few unkind words to say about the show — and dapper host Alex Trebek.

"I know, I know, the old folks love him," Jennings writes in a recent posting, titled "Dear Jeopardy!" on his Web site.

"Nobody knows he died in that fiery truck crash a few years back and was immediately replaced with the Trebektron 4000 (I see your engineers still can't get the mustache right, by the way)."

Jennings also takes aim at the show's "effete, left-coast" categories and "same-old" format.

"You're like the Dorian Gray of syndication," he says. "You seem to think `change' means replacing a blue polyethylene backdrop with a slightly different shade of blue polyethylene backdrop every presidential election or so."

A call by The Associated Press to "Jeopardy!" spokesman Jeff Ritter was not immediately returned Tuesday.

Jennings, a software engineer from Salt Lake City, snagged 74 wins on "Jeopardy!" in 2004 before he was beaten by challenger Nancy Zerg.

Trebek, 66, has hosted the show since 1984. In a "correction" posted Monday on his Web site, Jennings offers an apology of sorts.

"We regret the insinuation that Mr. Alex Trebek is a robot, and has been since 2004. Mr. Trebek's robotic frame does still contain some organic parts, many harvested from patriotic Canadian schoolchildren, so this technically makes him a `cyborg,' not a `robot.'"

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20060725/ap_en_tv/people_ken_jennings


This dude used to womp(yeah I said womp) on people in Jepoardy. If anyone hasnt seen him he would be up maybe $25,000 while the 2nd place guy has $2,000 and 3rd place $500.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: fuisse on July 25, 2006, 05:47:36 PM
http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9E0CEFDA1139F936A35757C0A9629C8B63

DaimlerChrysler to End Options Rewards
Print Save
 
Published: April 5, 2004
DaimlerChrysler AG will no longer reward its executives by offering them stock options, a spokesman said on Sunday.

The spokesman said Daimler's chief executive, Jürgen E. Schrempp, would present a new remuneration system for its 6,000 executives at the group's annual shareholders meeting in Berlin on Wednesday.

The old stock options plan will expire next year. The spokesman declined to give details.

Stock options have been criticized for giving executives an incentive to drive up share prices in the short term without considering long-term consequences. The move mirrors one by Europe's top phone carrier, Deutsche Telekom, which said last month that it would drop stock options and introduce a salary plan for executives that includes parts that hinge on reaching yearly and midterm goals without using stock options.



I am new here. My name is Peter Fuisse. I have majored in mechanical engineering and minor in French. I will be attending law school in the fall. Thank you
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: BrerAnansi on July 25, 2006, 06:43:22 PM

I am new here. My name is Peter Fuisse. I have majored in mechanical engineering and minor in French. I will be attending law school in the fall. Thank you

This has to be the oddest, little introduction I've ever read on these boards...so formal...but I like it.  Welcome Peter.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on July 25, 2006, 07:14:20 PM
Firefighters who want to live in high-priced cities can work two jobs, said W. Michael Cox, chief economist for the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas. “I think it’s great,” he said. “It gives you portfolio diversification in your income.” Pay for essential workers like plumbers and cabdrivers will tend to go up, he said.

Lol.  "Portfolio diversification in your income."  Only an economist.  I love it. :D
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: 2Lacoste on July 26, 2006, 07:46:06 AM
'ere you happy?

--------------------------------------------

Ashcroft Nostalgia

By Ruth Marcus
Wednesday, July 26, 2006; Page A17

Alberto Gonzales is achieving something remarkable, even miraculous, as attorney general: He is making John Ashcroft look good.

I was no fan of President Bush's first attorney general, who may be best remembered for holding prayer breakfasts with department brass, hiding the bare-breasted statue in the Great Hall of Justice behind an $8,000 set of drapes, and warning darkly that those who differed with administration policy were giving aid to terrorists.
 
But as I watched Gonzales testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee last week, it struck me: In terms of competence (the skill with which he handles the job) and character (willingness to stand up to the president), Gonzales is enough to make you yearn for the good old Ashcroft days.

Gonzales is an amiable man, not nearly so polarizing or ideological as his predecessor. If you were given the old desert-island choice between the two, he would be the better option -- more likely to share the rainwater, less likely to make you listen to him sing. (If you've ever heard Ashcroft's "Let the Eagle Soar," you know what I mean.)

Where Ashcroft was hard-edged and combative, Gonzales is pleasant and seemingly imperturbable. He's always reminded me a bit of the Pillsbury doughboy: No matter how hard he's poked, he springs back, smiling.

At the start of last week's hearing, Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Arlen Specter (R-Pa.), sounding like an exasperated high school English teacher, chastised Gonzales for failing to turn in his prepared statement on time. The attorney general sat silent, then calmly delivered the tardy testimony.

The next three hours and 40 minutes illustrated just about everything that is wrong with Gonzales's Justice.

There is no polite way to put this: Gonzales doesn't seem to have an adequate grasp of what's happening in his own department or much influence in setting administration policy.

Asked about House-passed legislation that would bar Justice from enforcing a year-old law requiring trigger locks on newly sold handguns, Gonzales said he was "not aware of" the dispute. Asked about his department's prosecutions of corrupt Border Patrol agents (described in a front-page story in this newspaper), Gonzales said he would "have to get back to you."

And when Sen. Edward M. Kennedy (D-Mass.) inquired whether the administration supported reauthorization of the Voting Rights Act as passed by the House, Gonzales didn't seem empowered to give him a straight answer -- though the Judiciary Committee was set to take up the measure that afternoon. "I don't know if I'm in a position to state that as an administration we're going to support that," Gonzales said.

Gonzales as witness is a maddening exercise in jello-nailing. "I'm going to move on and accept your non-answer, because I don't think I'm going to get anything more on that subject, and perhaps nothing more on the next subject," Specter told Gonzales after a fruitless line of questioning about whether Justice was -- as the attorney general had said in May -- considering prosecuting journalists for publishing leaks.

Specter's bleak prediction proved accurate. When he asked Gonzales about the attorney general's previous assurance that the National Security Agency's electronic surveillance was the only program not subject to judicial authorization, this illuminating exchange ensued.

Gonzales: "I'm not sure that those are the words that I used, Mr. Chairman."

Specter: "Well, the substance of the words you used."
 
Gonzales: "Those are the substance of the words I used, but those are not the exact words that I used."

At which point Specter gave up and changed topics.

Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.) didn't fare any better on military tribunals. Leahy asked whether Congress should simply ratify the existing system, as an assistant attorney general had urged the previous week.

Gonzales: "That would certainly be one alternative that Congress could consider, Senator Leahy."

Leahy, trying again: "Is that the administration's position, yes or no?"

Gonzales: "I don't believe the administration has a position as to where Congress should begin its deliberations."

Well, that was informative.

The big news of the hearing -- that the president had in effect killed an internal Justice investigation into the domestic spying program by refusing to grant the necessary security clearances to department lawyers -- underscores the most disturbing aspect of Gonzales's tenure: his lack of independence from the president. If Gonzales disagreed with this move -- a bad call and an even worse precedent -- he offered no hint of it at the hearing.

This is not a surprise -- after all, Gonzales's entire public career is entwined with that of George W. Bush -- but it is a disappointment. Ashcroft at least clashed with the White House over detainee policy (he fought internally to give citizens detained as enemy combatants access to counsel) and warrantless surveillance (he refused when Gonzales came to his hospital room asking that he sign papers extending the program).

To his credit, Gonzales did resist -- he supposedly threatened to quit -- when the president, pummeled by congressional Republicans over the search of a Democratic congressman's office, considered ordering Justice to return the documents. But Attorney General Gonzales doesn't seem to have any less zeal for unbridled presidential power -- or any less willingness to make outlandish arguments on its behalf -- than did White House Counsel Gonzales.

Which is precisely why he shouldn't be there in the first place -- and why I am experiencing intermittent twinges of a most unexpected emotion: Ashcroft nostalgia.



Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on July 26, 2006, 07:56:54 AM
Lol.  Watch your back, lacoste.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: 2Lacoste on July 26, 2006, 08:02:47 AM
Lol.  Watch your back, lacoste.


*Peering over shoulder*
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: _BP_ on July 26, 2006, 08:11:18 AM
I was tempted to stop here, but unfortunately I pressed on ;)

Gonzales is enough to make you yearn for the good old Ashcroft days.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: mivida2k on July 26, 2006, 08:18:57 AM
I was tempted to stop here, but unfortunately I pressed on ;)

Gonzales is enough to make you yearn for the good old Ashcroft days.


Dang.


Ohio court blocks eminent domain project
By JULIE CARR SMYTH, Associated Press Writer
49 minutes ago
 


COLUMBUS, Ohio - The Ohio Supreme Court ruled unanimously on Wednesday that a Cincinnati suburb cannot take private property by eminent domain for a $125 million project of offices, shops and restaurants.
 
The case was the first challenge of property rights laws to reach a state high court since the        U.S. Supreme Court last summer allowed municipalities to seize homes for use by a private developer.

The case involves the city of Norwood, which used its power of eminent domain to seize properties holding out against private development in an area considered to be deteriorating.

The court found that economic development isn't a sufficient reason under the state constitution to justify taking homes.

In the ruling, Justice Maureen O'Connor said cities may consider economic benefits but that courts deciding such cases in the future must "apply heightened scrutiny" to assure private citizens' property rights.

"For the individual property owner, the appropriation is not simply the seizure of a house," she wrote. "It is the taking of a home — the place where ancestors toiled, where families were raised, where memories were made,"

Targeting property because it is in a deteriorating area also is unconstitutional because the term is too vague and requires speculation, the court found.

O'Connor wrote that the court attempted in its decision to balance "two competing interests of great import in American democracy: the individual's rights in the possession and security of property, and the sovereign's power to take private property for the benefit of the community."
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: redemption on July 26, 2006, 08:19:43 AM
The racists are driven by envy of Asian success

My home town, Preston, doesn't feel like Britain's race hate capital. But the social decay in white areas has created tensions

Faisal Bodi
Wednesday July 26, 2006
The Guardian

To the outsider there's little to suggest that Fishwick Parade, the scene of Saturday's fatal stabbing of 20-year-old Shezan Umarji, is much different from any other predominantly Asian inner-city area in northern England, or that Shezan was a victim of a rampant racism that has led to Preston, my home town, being described as Britain's race-hate capital.

The floral tributes to Shezan, around a tree near where he fell, are signed by both Muslims and Christians. White and Asian residents tick off journalists for portraying a misleading image of a racially torn town. And the heavy police presence isn't too unusual in a part of Preston renowned as one of its toughest and roughest.

Residents are used to things kicking off around here. They put it down to youths fighting over turf, burnishing their gang credentials. But that is to gloss over the fact that in most cases the conflicts are played out along racial lines. Even now, beneath the shared sense of grief at the loss of a young life, the climate is one in which two communities coexist uneasily in the knowledge that a highly charged youngster from either side could trigger another clash.

Head east along Fishwick Parade and the predominantly Asian area gives way to the almost exclusively white Callon estate. Callon is the kind of place where youths tear up and down the streets on mini motorbikes and hurl bricks at fire engines arriving to put out car blazes they have started - and where their parents hang the cross of Saint George out of bedroom windows to tell the "darkies" that this is a white area.

Another conspicuous difference is the ubiquitous presence of CCTV cameras. Perched on 10m poles, these were installed several years ago to control rising crime - drugs, prostitution, burglary and violence - on the estate. Cameras never lie, and their location reflects an uncomfortable truth. They begin at Callon, which indicates that crime here is of a much higher order than in neighbouring Fishwick, which is predominantly Muslim and south Asian.

The social demography will be familiar to most south Asian Muslims living in areas bordering working-class white and, for that matter, black estates. Politicians seem preoccupied with the problems Muslim communities present in terms of "social cohesion". In fact it is Britain's white and black underclass that is in more urgent need of integration into mainstream society and the common values it upholds.

Callon is one such example. Marked by high unemployment, low educational achievement, high incidence of single-parent and broken families, endemic crime, welfare dependency and a culture of hedonism, these estates are easy prey for the far-right and its diagnosis that "you're poor because they're better off". True, many Asian Muslim communities suffer from similar social conditions, but these are often mitigated by a family-centred culture that values self-help and educational achievement. For all the relatively poor showing of their communities in socioeconomic indices, they are nevertheless outperforming their white working-class peers.

But instead of being emulated, Asian Muslims have increasingly found themselves becoming targets. Last year's racial unrest in the Handsworth and Lozells areas of Birmingham, between Bengali/Pakistani Muslims and African-Caribbeans, originated in the unfounded perception that Asians - with their highly visible businesses - had benefited disproportionately from public funds. The same resentment had been brought to the surface before the Oldham and Bradford riots of 2001. And a common view among the Asians who live near Callon is that the racism they suffer at the hands of local whites arises from economic jealousy.

Despite Callon, Preston is probably no worse for racism than other northern towns. Certainly its tag as Britain's race-hate capital does not tally with the experiences of most residents - of all colours. The national high of 3.82 racially motivated incidents per 1,000 people in 2004-05 is better viewed as the result of local police efforts to persuade victims to come forward. Last year a city council survey found that 81% of ethnic-minority residents saw Preston as a tolerant place to live.

However, four out of five of Preston's racist crimes in 2004-05 were perpetrated by whites against Asians. It's a pattern that is repeated across the north. The task for policy makers is to get to grips with the source of the racism - a destructive resentment born of being locked in an underclass characterised by a debilitating poverty of aspiration, exacerbated no doubt by stereotypes of "terrorist Muslims".

Local and national governments can only do so much: they can help improve people's life chances, as they have tried to do with large injections of social and economic capital into Callon. The rest is up to the people who live in these working-class communities. They need to accept that huge changes will have to be made to their own attitudes and habits if they are not to remain stuck on the lowest rungs of the socioeconomic ladder.

·
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: AshyLarry on July 26, 2006, 08:56:38 AM
I hope none of us get this desperate!!
++++++++++++++++


WELLINGTON, New Zealand - A bald, mustachioed lawyer turned up at court wearing a skirt and blouse and toting a purse to protest a lack of care and sensitivity among New Zealand's male-dominated judiciary, a newspaper reported Tuesday.

Rob Moodie, 67, arrived at Wellington's High Court on Monday in a navy blue woman's suit complete with diamond brooch and lace-topped stockings over his hairy legs, The Dominion Post reported.

"I will now, as a lawyer, be wearing women's clothing," Moodie said. He said he wants the court to address him as "Ms. Alice" — and that his wife and three children support his protest.

His attire, he insisted, is to highlight the insensitive "old boys' network" of New Zealand's judiciary.

"My confidence in the male ethos is zilch. It's a culture of intimidation, authority, power and control," the high-profile lawyer said.

Moodie said that although he is heterosexual he was born with an innate understanding of the female gender.

Calls to Moodie's family home rang unanswered Tuesday.

His protest was prompted by frustration over a long-running case involving a farming couple held responsible for a bridge built by the army on their land that collapsed, killing a beekeeper.

He told The Dominion Post that the "last straw" was last month's Court of Appeal ruling that ordered the couple — who have already sold their farm to fund their legal efforts — to pay the army $6,200 in costs.

Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: faith2005 on July 26, 2006, 02:14:25 PM
um md--bp's post is in response to that same article you just posted which is on the previous page. he was saying that he was tempted to stop reading the article at the headline, but he continued to read. lacoste posted it.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: crazy8 on July 26, 2006, 02:16:22 PM
Thanks Faith I haven't been paying much attention to Lacoste's posts  :D I just read it in the paper.  I'll remove.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: 2Lacoste on July 26, 2006, 02:17:46 PM
See what I'm saying?  This thread = utter confusion.  That is all.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: crazy8 on July 26, 2006, 02:21:03 PM
It's not that I didn't see it, I just skipped over it, hence I didn't realize it wa t he same thing.  That is all.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: crazy8 on July 27, 2006, 02:51:39 PM
 :'( :'(

Surgery could end Faulk's career
http://www.cnn.com/2006/SPORT/07/22/NFL.faulk/index.html?section=cnn_latest
Saturday, July 22, 2006

NEW YORK -- St. Louis Rams running back Marshall Faulk's career is in jeopardy because of a damaged knee.

He will certainly miss the 2006 season because of reconstructive surgery, the team announced.

Rams coach Scott Linehan told a news conference: "I think reality is setting in for sure that potentially his career is winding down."

The Rams were quick to say that Faulk was not retiring, but the running back did not attend the news conference.

Faulk had recently been contemplating retirement, even before the latest news on his knee.

He is expected to have surgery next week, although the team would not confirm that or say which knee would be operated on.

Faulk was the NFL's MVP in 2000. He ranks ninth on the career rushing list with 12,279 yards, but managed just 292 yards last season and started just one game, the season finale.

He played for five seasons with the Indianapolis Colts before being traded to the Rams in 1999, helping them to the Super Bowl in 2000.

Faulk has been a Pro Bowl selection seven times, but lost his starting running back job before the 2004 season.

Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: mivida2k on July 27, 2006, 04:40:05 PM
 Civil-Rights Victory: Corporate Support Key in Voting Rights Act Renewal
Compiled by the DiversityInc staff
© 2006 DiversityInc.com®
July 27, 2006
 

The U.S. Senate unanimously voted to renew the Voting Rights Act of 1965 (VRA) last Thursday, prompted by the many civil-rights and advocacy groups that rallied in support of the historic legislation. But alongside these organizations' demands was another sound, one less commonly heard on social-policy battleground: the voice of corporate America.

Today, President Bush signed legislation extending for 25 years the Voting Rights Act, the historic 1965 law which opened polls to millions of black Americans by outlawing racist voting practices in the South. "Congress has reaffirmed its belief that all men are created equal," he declared.


Bush signed the bill amid fanfare and before a South Lawn audience that included members of Congress, civil-rights leaders and family members of civil-rights leaders of the recent past. It was one of a series of high-profile ceremonies the president is holding to sign popular bills into law.

According to an article in The Hill, more than 10 senior-level executives publicly advocated renewal of the VRA, including officials from Verizon Communications (No. 1), The Coca-Cola Co. (No. 3), PepsiCo (No. 18)—all in The 2006 DiversityInc Top 50 Companies for Diversity— as well as CBS, Tyco, Eli Lilly, Freddie Mac, the Walt Disney Co., and three companies on DiversityInc's 25 Noteworthy Companies this year: AT&T, Wal-Mart and Comcast. Pfizer CEO Hank McKinnell pledged support on behalf of the Business Roundtable, an association of more than 150 CEOs whose companies generate $4.5 trillion annually in combined revenue and have more than 10 million employees.


Corporate involvement came after a July 10 Black Leadership Forum conference call, when forum leaders from the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), the National Urban League and the Congressional Black Caucus (CBC) petitioned executives for assistance in what had become a highly volatile debate. Last month, a group of conservative House Republicans objected so vociferously to two provisional sections of the VRA that the bill was pulled from the floor because it did not have enough support to pass.

While most of the VRA is permanent, particularly the part that guarantees equal voting rights for all people regardless of race or color, three enforcement-related provisions were due to expire in August 2007 unless reauthorized by Congress and undersigned by President Bush. These included:


·    Section 5: Requires jurisdictions with a history of discriminatory electoral practices to pre-clear any mid-decennial district changes with the U.S. Department of Justice or the U.S. District Court in Washington, D.C.

·    Section 203: Ensures that non-English-speaking or limited-English-proficiency citizens receive voting assistance as necessary to be informed participants in elections.

·    Sections 6 through 9: Authorize the attorney general to appoint election monitors and poll watchers to protect election-related civil rights.

Recent Senate legislation making English the official national language, redistricting in Louisiana post-Katrina and related unfavorable Supreme Court decisions had cast doubt on whether or not the government would renew these provisions, all enacted to protect voting rights for people of color, which unscrupulous electoral practices previously had denied. Congressional hearings held in 2005 and 2006 found tactics such as at-large elections, annexations, last minute poll-site changes and redistricting had discriminatory impacts on these voters, a conclusion supported by more than 12,000 pages of testimony, according to the NAACP. 

This relationship building activity focuses on individual trust, conflict resolution, and team effectiveness in the workplace. An ideal exercise or full-day activity for groups that are experiencing conflict and stagnation, or groups that simply want to increase their team's productivity and satisfaction.

The Hill article tags such corporate advocacy as unusual, highlighting companies' tendencies to avoid controversial social issues and stick to legislative matters that directly impact their respective industries or the economy at large. But the article neglects a vital point: This one does.


According to the Business Roundtable's Web site: "The Roundtable believes that the basic interests of business closely parallel the interests of the American people, who are directly involved as consumers, employees, shareholders, and suppliers."


Wal-Mart was the first large company to back the VRA reauthorization, which it did publicly after a 2005 meeting with CBC members. CEO Lee Scott wrote to President Bush in June 2005 and to Congress last month to advocate his company's support.


Corporations backed the bill for various reasons, including efforts to sustain democracy, stimulate the economy and promote workplace diversity, according to the article, which finds it uncommon for businesses to use controversial legislation as an avenue for advancing this agenda. While this may be rare, it has most certainly happened in the past, and not all that long ago.


Remember when 65 corporations filed an amicus brief with the U.S. Supreme Court supporting the University of Michigan's race-conscious admissions policies in the critical affirmative-action 2003 case Grutter v. Bollinger? President Bush himself denounced affirmative action, calling the school's system "hopelessly flawed." Indeed, it was corporate support that helped sustain civil rights in this scenario.


While not the sole influence pushing Congress to reauthorize the VRA, corporate advocacy may have resonated with many elected officials.

"Corporate influence is heavy in this institution for good or bad," CBC Chairman Melvin Watt, D-N.C., told The Hill. "A lot of members believe that when a corporation takes a position, it gives them the necessary justification and/or cover to support it."

Despite four amendments opposing the renewal, the VRA passed in the House by a ratio of nearly 12-to-1 on July 13 and cleared the Senate in less than 30 minutes a week later, according to the NAACP. Now it awaits the signature of President Bush, who has already said he will sign the bill into law, a statement he reaffirmed at Thursday's NAACP annual convention.   
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: crazy8 on July 28, 2006, 09:16:02 AM
I think it's a personal insult that the VRA act was up for debate in the first place. They should have just renewed it period.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: crazy8 on July 28, 2006, 09:16:40 AM
An op-ed from a friend:



Have you ever listened to songs or watched videos from the 80's or early
90's and realized how much things have changed, in life as well as
music? How about watching people in the club lose control when a classic
hip-hop record blares through the speakers, whisking everyone over the
age of twenty-one into a state of complete nostalgia, remembering
exactly where you were and what you were doing when the song was brand
new. As the years go by, it's always experiences like these that really
let you know full and clear that you are getting old. But with age
always comes wisdom. Kickin' it with younger kids always brings this
home for me. In a poetry/hip-hop workshop I facilitated the other day,
while discussing music, writing and creativity with a group of 8th and
9th graders, I couldn't help but notice that one of these young
scrappers was wearing a Tupac T-shirt. After a proud speech on how Tupac
was "the realest", I was shocked to hear after asking him what his
favorite Tupac song was, that he really didn't have one, as he wasn't
interested in Tupac's music as much as he was in the way the t-shirt
made him look. I then asked him how old he was when Tupac died, to which
he replied, "I think like...3". I was baffled by this boy's pride to
wear a t-shirt of a rapper he has never really listened to.

This experience has caused me to question, has hip-hop lost its roots?
Is the new generation of fans and emcees out of touch with their
heritage? Because hip-hop, for the most part, is marketed to youth
culture, how important is it for young people to know the history of the
music, the culture and the revolution? Who is out there to ensure that
we never forget the strides and mistakes made by those who have come
before us? How do we know where we're going if we don't know where we've
come from? Ultimately, I ask, has hip-hop lost its soul?

To truly answer these questions, we must first determine what it means
to have "soul". To be "soulful" should not be misconstrued as someone
who wears thrift-store clothing while going shopping for head-wraps and
incense. Having soul also does not mean you don't have a job either,
because you don't want to work for "The Man", pumping your fist while
you pose in your Marcus Garvey or Che Guevara shirt. More than an image,
a look or an ideal, I think the criteria to be considered "soulful"
involves, more than anything else, a keen awareness of your culture or
background. Be it African-American, Latino, European, Arab, Asian or
even hip-hop, it's important to be aware of who you are culturally
because in the end, those are your roots as an individual. The soul is
considered to be the root of the human being. The soul is the very
essence of our existence, thusly becoming the foundation from which we
spring forth into the world. To say some one or something has "soul"
means that they embody the potential of the present, motivated by the
promise of the future and strengthened by the wisdom of the past.

It is our understanding of our past and our culture that guides our
future, thus giving us soul. It can be argued that hip-hop music is in
the unique position of being the only genre of music that doesn't
appreciate its own past. If you consider the lifespan of the average rap
career, which is about three years, and factor in the constant turnover
of record labels' artist rosters, you would see that we have more "Where
are they now?" questions than a missing persons website. It would seem
that our cultural icons are not meant to stay. Why else is it that when
a rapper passes the age of 30, he's considered washed up, unlike rock
artist such as Steve Tyler from Aerosmith, Paul McCartney from The
Beatles, and Mick Jagger from the Rolling Stones, who are all almost in
their 60's and are still able to pack arena's and sell records? On 106th
and Park, the Flashback Joint of the Day is usually a song that came out
no more than four years ago by artists who, more often than not, are no
longer on the scene. Hip-hop artist comebacks are seldom seen, because
the artist is usually replaced by a younger, upgraded version of who
they once were.

You can't blame hip-hop for neglecting its own past and culture, as this
is the result of a larger problem. Hip-hop, being young itself, is a
sub-culture stemming from other cultures that have influenced not only
the music, but the attitude of the people who identify with the entire
movement. Along with the ethnic influences, be they African-American,
Latino or Caucasian, hip-hop is mostly a product of its environment, the
ghettos and low income communities of the inner city. The music was born
from the plight of the people who created it. Past and culture are
typically what develop one's morals, values and what we all view as
important. People understand culture and what's important based on how
they are raised, their upbringing and all that is instilled in them from
the institution of family. Because the institution of family is
conspicuously absent from the landscape of urban America, where fathers
figures aren't present and mothers, more than likely, work all day or
night, we are raised without a sense of history. When there is no sense
of history, there is no sense of pride for our own heritage, as we are
left unaware of who we are; unaware of our past, unaware of our culture,
unaware of our souls.

Because we don't know who we are culturally, the corporate power
structure that controls television and radio programming, all the while
marketing hip-hop to sell their products, have been telling us what our
culture is. With missing parental guidance, television and radio have
replaced parents in some households, raising you in the absence of your
actual mother and father. Corporate America is trying to have its
consumer base focus on the right now, keeping your hearts and minds
living for the moment, rather than moving forward based on your
understanding and pride of the past. If all you're about is your fads
and the most recent trend, what will you have when the trend and the
fads are gone?

Hip-hop culture is starting to lack culture. Is our "in the moment"
mentality along with our contempt for anything that isn't brand new
ushering in the decline of the entire movement? Because hip-hop is now
in its 30's, is it starting to face the same fate as artists in their
30's? More than street credibility, I think hip-hop artists need soul
credibility. Like one would have respect for their elders, a hip-hop
artist should show respect for those who have come before them, those
who have paved the way for new artists to find their direction in the
haze and calamity of the entertainment world. I realized however that in
order to get the soul back into hip-hop, we must first get the soul back
into our households. We must learn about our own history, culture and
values and be proud of them, in order to aware of who we are, where we
come from and what we stand for. If you don't stand for something,
you'll fall for anything, but it is the soul of the past that will catch
you and bring you back to the heights that you aspire to reach.

"It ain't about what you cop, it's about what you keep..."-Lauryn Hill
The Final Hour
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: jarhead on July 28, 2006, 08:37:24 PM
An op-ed from a friend:



Have you ever listened to songs or watched videos from the 80's or early
90's and realized how much things have changed, in life as well as
music? How about watching people in the club lose control when a classic
hip-hop record blares through the speakers, whisking everyone over the
age of twenty-one into a state of complete nostalgia, remembering
exactly where you were and what you were doing when the song was brand
new. As the years go by, it's always experiences like these that really
let you know full and clear that you are getting old. But with age
always comes wisdom. Kickin' it with younger kids always brings this
home for me. In a poetry/hip-hop workshop I facilitated the other day,
while discussing music, writing and creativity with a group of 8th and
9th graders, I couldn't help but notice that one of these young
scrappers was wearing a Tupac T-shirt. After a proud speech on how Tupac
was "the realest", I was shocked to hear after asking him what his
favorite Tupac song was, that he really didn't have one, as he wasn't
interested in Tupac's music as much as he was in the way the t-shirt
made him look. I then asked him how old he was when Tupac died, to which
he replied, "I think like...3". I was baffled by this boy's pride to
wear a t-shirt of a rapper he has never really listened to.

This experience has caused me to question, has hip-hop lost its roots?
Is the new generation of fans and emcees out of touch with their
heritage? Because hip-hop, for the most part, is marketed to youth
culture, how important is it for young people to know the history of the
music, the culture and the revolution? Who is out there to ensure that
we never forget the strides and mistakes made by those who have come
before us? How do we know where we're going if we don't know where we've
come from? Ultimately, I ask, has hip-hop lost its soul?

To truly answer these questions, we must first determine what it means
to have "soul". To be "soulful" should not be misconstrued as someone
who wears thrift-store clothing while going shopping for head-wraps and
incense. Having soul also does not mean you don't have a job either,
because you don't want to work for "The Man", pumping your fist while
you pose in your Marcus Garvey or Che Guevara shirt. More than an image,
a look or an ideal, I think the criteria to be considered "soulful"
involves, more than anything else, a keen awareness of your culture or
background. Be it African-American, Latino, European, Arab, Asian or
even hip-hop, it's important to be aware of who you are culturally
because in the end, those are your roots as an individual. The soul is
considered to be the root of the human being. The soul is the very
essence of our existence, thusly becoming the foundation from which we
spring forth into the world. To say some one or something has "soul"
means that they embody the potential of the present, motivated by the
promise of the future and strengthened by the wisdom of the past.

It is our understanding of our past and our culture that guides our
future, thus giving us soul. It can be argued that hip-hop music is in
the unique position of being the only genre of music that doesn't
appreciate its own past. If you consider the lifespan of the average rap
career, which is about three years, and factor in the constant turnover
of record labels' artist rosters, you would see that we have more "Where
are they now?" questions than a missing persons website. It would seem
that our cultural icons are not meant to stay. Why else is it that when
a rapper passes the age of 30, he's considered washed up, unlike rock
artist such as Steve Tyler from Aerosmith, Paul McCartney from The
Beatles, and Mick Jagger from the Rolling Stones, who are all almost in
their 60's and are still able to pack arena's and sell records? On 106th
and Park, the Flashback Joint of the Day is usually a song that came out
no more than four years ago by artists who, more often than not, are no
longer on the scene. Hip-hop artist comebacks are seldom seen, because
the artist is usually replaced by a younger, upgraded version of who
they once were.

You can't blame hip-hop for neglecting its own past and culture, as this
is the result of a larger problem. Hip-hop, being young itself, is a
sub-culture stemming from other cultures that have influenced not only
the music, but the attitude of the people who identify with the entire
movement. Along with the ethnic influences, be they African-American,
Latino or Caucasian, hip-hop is mostly a product of its environment, the
ghettos and low income communities of the inner city. The music was born
from the plight of the people who created it. Past and culture are
typically what develop one's morals, values and what we all view as
important. People understand culture and what's important based on how
they are raised, their upbringing and all that is instilled in them from
the institution of family. Because the institution of family is
conspicuously absent from the landscape of urban America, where fathers
figures aren't present and mothers, more than likely, work all day or
night, we are raised without a sense of history. When there is no sense
of history, there is no sense of pride for our own heritage, as we are
left unaware of who we are; unaware of our past, unaware of our culture,
unaware of our souls.

Because we don't know who we are culturally, the corporate power
structure that controls television and radio programming, all the while
marketing hip-hop to sell their products, have been telling us what our
culture is. With missing parental guidance, television and radio have
replaced parents in some households, raising you in the absence of your
actual mother and father. Corporate America is trying to have its
consumer base focus on the right now, keeping your hearts and minds
living for the moment, rather than moving forward based on your
understanding and pride of the past. If all you're about is your fads
and the most recent trend, what will you have when the trend and the
fads are gone?

Hip-hop culture is starting to lack culture. Is our "in the moment"
mentality along with our contempt for anything that isn't brand new
ushering in the decline of the entire movement? Because hip-hop is now
in its 30's, is it starting to face the same fate as artists in their
30's? More than street credibility, I think hip-hop artists need soul
credibility. Like one would have respect for their elders, a hip-hop
artist should show respect for those who have come before them, those
who have paved the way for new artists to find their direction in the
haze and calamity of the entertainment world. I realized however that in
order to get the soul back into hip-hop, we must first get the soul back
into our households. We must learn about our own history, culture and
values and be proud of them, in order to aware of who we are, where we
come from and what we stand for. If you don't stand for something,
you'll fall for anything, but it is the soul of the past that will catch
you and bring you back to the heights that you aspire to reach.

"It ain't about what you cop, it's about what you keep..."-Lauryn Hill
The Final Hour



its sad really...these kids nowadays have no clue...hip hop used to be about something even when it wasn't...you had to have lyrical skill......i had a 18 year tell me that a tribe called quest was corny....what!!!!! corny i almost lost my mind low end theory midnight mauraders it just dont get no better i asked him who he liked and he said Dip Set...Dip Set WTF! i mean just kill yourself, kill yourself now... i mean most of these kids dont even know who lauryn hill is once again kill yourself....nevermind slick rick, dougie fresh, big daddy kane, ll (back when he rocked the bells and took a muscle bound man and put his face in the sand), erik b and rakim, just no clue...they dont even that most of these dudes re-use other people's lyrics...
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: crazy8 on July 30, 2006, 06:54:17 PM
SUPREME COURT CONFIRMATIONS
Roberts and Alito Misled Us

By Edward M. Kennedy
Sunday, July 30, 2006; Page B01

I have had the honor of serving on the Senate Judiciary Committee for 43 years, during which I've participated in confirmation hearings for all the justices who now sit on the Supreme Court. Over that time, my colleagues and I have asked probing questions and listened attentively to substantive responses. Because we were able to learn a great deal about the nominees from those hearings, the Senate has rarely voted along party lines. I voted, for example, for three of President Ronald Reagan's five Supreme Court nominees.

Of course, an examination of a nominee's views may cause the Senate to withhold its consent. That is what happened in 1795 to John Rutledge, who was given a temporary commission as chief justice by President George Washington (while Congress was in recess) and was then rejected by the Senate several months later. In 1970, President Richard M. Nixon's nomination of G. Harrold Carswell was derailed when the Senate learned of his segregationist past. At that time, I explained that "the Constitution makes clear that we are not supposed to be a rubber stamp for White House selections." That was also the Senate's view in 1987, when its rejection of Robert H. Bork's extreme views led to the unanimous confirmation of the more moderate Anthony M. Kennedy. The Senate's constitutional role has helped keep the court in the mainstream of legal thought.


But the careful, bipartisan process of years past -- like so many checks and balances rooted in our Constitution -- has been badly broken by the current Bush administration. The result has been the confirmation of two justices, John G. Roberts Jr. and Samuel A. Alito Jr., whose voting record on the court reflects not the neutral, modest judicial philosophy they promised the Judiciary Committee, but an activist's embrace of the administration's political and ideological agenda.

Now that the votes are in from their first term, we can see plainly the agenda that Roberts and Alito sought to conceal from the committee. Our new justices consistently voted to erode civil liberties, decrease the rights of minorities and limit environmental protections. At the same time, they voted to expand the power of the president, reduce restrictions on abusive police tactics and approve federal intrusion into issues traditionally governed by state law.

The confirmation process became broken because the Bush administration learned the wrong lesson from the failed Bork nomination and decided it could still nominate extremists as long as their views were hidden. To that end, it insisted that the Senate confine its inquiry largely to its nominees' personal qualities.

The administration's tactics succeeded in turning the confirmation hearings for Roberts and Alito into a sham. Many Republican senators used their time to praise, rather than probe, the nominees. Coached by the administration, the nominees declined to answer critical questions. When pressed on issues such as civil rights and executive power, Roberts and Alito responded with earnest assurances that they would not bring an ideological agenda to the bench.

After confirmation, we saw an entirely different Roberts and Alito -- both partisans ready and willing to tilt the court away from the mainstream. They voted together in 91 percent of all cases and 88 percent of non-unanimous cases -- more than any other two justices.

A few examples help illustrate how the confirmation process failed the American people. During Roberts's hearing, I asked him about his statement that a key part of the Voting Rights Act constitutes one of "the most intrusive interferences imaginable by federal courts into state and local processes." In response, he suggested that his words were nothing more than an "effort to articulate the views of the administration . . . for which I worked 23 years ago."

Today -- too late -- it is clear that Roberts's personal view is the same as it was 23 years ago. In League of United Latin American Citizens v. Perry , the Supreme Court held that Texas's 2003 redistricting plan violated the Voting Rights Act by protecting a Republican legislator against a growing Latino population. Roberts reached a different view, concluding that the courts should not have been involved and that it "is a sordid business, this divvying us up by race."

The same Roberts who wished the federal government would leave Texas alone was unconcerned by federal intrusion into Oregon's approach to the issue of assisted suicide. In Gonzales v. Oregon , a majority of the Supreme Court held that the Justice Department lacked the power to undermine Oregon's Death With Dignity Act. However, Roberts joined a startling dissent by Justice Antonin Scalia, stating that the administration's actions were "unquestionably permissible" because the federal government can use the Constitution's commerce clause powers "for the purpose of protecting public morality."

It is difficult to believe that a neutral judicial philosophy explains Roberts's very different views in these two cases. He memorably claimed during the confirmation process that he wanted only to be a diligent umpire, calling balls and strikes without regard to what team was at bat. But it turns out that our new umpires have a keen interest in who wins and who loses.

One clear loser is the environment. In Rapanos v. United States , the court was asked to interpret the definition of wetlands under the Clean Water Act. Four justices deferred to the Army Corps of Engineers' expertise in implementing the statute. But Roberts and Alito joined an opinion that describes wetlands as "transitory puddles" and criticizes their colleagues for "giving that agency more deference than reason permits." For Roberts and Alito, protecting the environment -- unlike "protecting public morality" -- is clearly not a top priority.

cont'd....


Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: crazy8 on July 30, 2006, 06:55:45 PM
....cont'd

Perhaps the biggest winner is the president himself. During Alito's hearing, I asked him about a 1985 job application in which he stated that he believed "very strongly in the supremacy of the elected branches of government." He backpedaled, claiming: "I certainly didn't mean that literally at the time, and I wouldn't say that today."

But he is willing to say it now. In the very recent case of Hamdan v. Rumsfeld , Alito signed on to a dissent by Justice Clarence Thomas that asserts a judicial "duty to accept the Executive's judgment in matters of military operations and foreign affairs" as grounds for allowing the administration to use military commissions of its own design to try detainees at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

This is part of a pattern. When he was in the Reagan Justice Department, Alito wrote in support of signing statements, through which the president has claimed to limit the scope of measures passed by Congress -- including the ban on torture. When questioned about the legal status of such statements, he said it was an open issue that still needed to be "explored and resolved" by the court. But Alito joined a Scalia dissent in the Hamdan case that endorsed the use of signing statements without providing any analysis or legal support.

Similarly, Alito had a pattern of ruling against individuals in Fourth Amendment cases -- including a case involving the strip-search of a 10-year-old girl. When questioned, he insisted that one of the judiciary's most important roles "is to stand up and defend the rights of people when they are violated." But Alito cast the deciding vote in Hudson v. Michigan , in which the court decided -- contrary to almost a century of precedent -- that evidence gathered during an unconstitutional search of a suspect's home could be used to convict him.

In the term that begins in October, the court will decide major cases on abortion, affirmative action and the Clean Air Act. Roberts and Alito may well cast the deciding votes. If their first term is any indication, their agenda will be exactly what many of us feared -- and nothing like the judicial modesty they promised during their hearings.

At a time when great legal issues are being decided by the slimmest of margins, we cannot afford to learn nominees' views only after they have obtained lifetime tenure on our highest court. Instead, the Judiciary Committee, the Senate and the American Bar Association need to work together to return to an honest confirmation process. I support reform despite my belief that the next justice will be nominated by a Democratic president and be sent to a Democratic Senate for confirmation.

The discussion should start with a few truths. First, any qualified nominee to the Supreme Court will have spent many years thinking about legal issues. We should require that nominees share that thinking with the Judiciary Committee, and not pretend that such candor is tantamount to prejudging specific cases. In particular, the Senate should have the same access to the nominee's writings as the administration. Second, the Judiciary Committee will need to reorganize the way it asks questions. An in-depth inquiry will require something more than short rounds of questions that pass from senator to senator. Third, we need to remember what this process is all about. It is good to hear that a nominee has a loving family, faithful friends and a sense of humor. It is important to know that nominees possess the intellect, life experience and discipline that make a good judge. But it is essential that we learn enough of their legal views to be certain that they will make good on the simple promise etched in marble outside the Supreme Court: "Equal Justice Under Law."


Edward M. Kennedy (D) has represented Massachusetts in the Senate since 1963.

Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: crazy8 on July 31, 2006, 07:28:04 AM
Monday, July 31, 1:30 p.m. ET
Series: Being a Black Man

Michael Eric Dyson
Professor, University of Pennsylvania
Monday, July 31, 2006; 1:30 PM


http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/discussion/2006/07/24/DI2006072400708.html?nav=nsc

Michael Eric Dyson is a University of Pennsylvania professor and author of Is Bill Cosby Right? Or Has the Black Middle Class Lost Its Mind? (Basic Civitas Books, April 2005) and Come Hell or High Water (Perseus Books Group, February 2006).

Read Dyson's July 21 Washington Post op-ed "The Injustice Bill Cosby Won't See."

Dyson will take questions and comments on Monday, July 31 at 1:30 p.m. ET from readers about issues raised by the Post's "Being a Black Man" series.

Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: KeepitRealGirl on July 31, 2006, 11:35:57 AM
 >:( >:( >:( >:( >:( >:( >:( >:(


http://www.newyorkmetro.com/news/intelligencer/17161/

A Very Late Checkout
New York’s last Katrina evacuees prepare to depart (under duress) from the JFK Airport Holiday Inn.

This winter, FEMA put up over 300 Hurricane Katrina evacuees in New York City hotels. Almost all of them have gone back to their lives, their jobs. But not Theon Johnson. He’s currently sprawled out watching Halloween 5 on one of the two full-size beds in his room at the JFK Airport Holiday Inn. He is one of four evacuees still living in a hotel in the city.



The others left in February and March, when, after spending more than $500 million, FEMA stopped paying for hotel rooms housing some 40,000 evacuees across the country. That left many scrambling for places to live. But thanks to the city’s squatters-rights law, evacuees here were safe. Their rooms weren’t paid for, but since they’d been in them for more than 30 days, the hotels couldn’t just kick them out. Only a judge’s order could evict them.



And Johnson, 49, isn’t that motivated to leave. For one thing, AMC’s in the middle of its “Thrill Me” marathon. Next up, Gothika. “Halle Berry,” he says with lazy lust. These days he’s usually up all night—it’s hard to sleep on an empty stomach. When he has to, he’ll go outside and beg for change, but he doesn’t really like that too much. Most days he just showers and gets back in bed, showers and gets back in bed. Once a week he and another evacuee, a diabetic named Larry, walk to a church off the Van Wyck and get canned goods. When Johnson’s caseworker, Sharon, comes around, she gives him some bus passes and maybe a few bucks, but she’s getting frustrated. “They sit around on their butts watching TV. There’s only but so much I can do if they’re not willing to help themselves.”


After being flown here for free back in September, Johnson’s been at the Holiday Inn since Super Bowl Sunday. On April 21, the hotel served Johnson with three notices of occupancy termination, saying that it would begin court proceedings if he wasn’t out by May 9. He wasn’t, so it did. If the court boots him, Johnson could end up in one of the city’s homeless shelters. He’s been broke for over a month now. FEMA sent him $9,000 in housing aid, but he spent it all on booze, cigarettes, some clothes, and food—partying, mostly. “I spent my money just the way I wanted, and I think [fema] should send me some more,” he says. But it won’t. Johnson’s caseworker says FEMA offered to buy him a ticket home to New Orleans in February, but he didn’t take it. FEMA won’t now. So he’s stuck, at least until the Holiday Inn pays him to leave.



Attorneys with the Legal Aid Society have been negotiating a buyout deal for Johnson and the remaining evacuees, and expect a settlement—he heard about $1,200—imminently. He says he’ll use the money to get a room for a few nights and have some fun before flying back to his little house in New Orleans’ Third Ward. But for now, Gothika’s on. “Halle Berry,” Johnson says. “Halle . . . Berry.”
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on July 31, 2006, 11:43:10 AM
Lol.  At least the government isn't paying for it.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: blk_reign on July 31, 2006, 11:59:13 AM
good lord..
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on July 31, 2006, 12:49:37 PM
I didn't know it was offensive either:

Massachusetts governor apologizes for 'tar baby' comment

Monday, July 31, 2006; Posted: 9:42 a.m. EDT (13:42 GMT)

BOSTON, Massachusetts (AP) -- Gov. Mitt Romney has apologized for referring to the troubled Big Dig construction project as a "tar baby" during a fundraiser with Iowa Republicans, saying he didn't know anyone would be offended by the term some consider a racial epithet.

In a speech Saturday, Romney, a Republican considering a run for president in 2008, acknowledged he took a big political risk in taking control of the project after a fatal tunnel ceiling collapse, but said inaction would have been even worse.

"The best thing politically would be to stay as far away from that tar baby as I can," he told a crowd of about 100 supporters in Ames, Iowa.

Black leaders were outraged at his use of the term, which dates to the 19th century Uncle Remus stories, referring to a doll made of tar that traps Br'er Rabbit. It has come to be known as a way of describing a sticky mess, and has been used as a derogatory term for a black person.

"Tar baby is a totally inappropriate phrase in the 21st century," said Larry Jones, a black Republican and civil rights activist.

"He thinks he's presidential timber," Jones said. "But all he's shown us is arrogance."

Romney's spokesman, Eric Fehrnstrom, said the governor was describing "a sticky situation."

"He was unaware that some people find the term objectionable and he's sorry if anyone's offended," Fehrnstrom said.

White House spokesman Tony Snow sparked similar criticism in May when he used the term in response to a question about government surveillance.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: bijou on July 31, 2006, 12:56:37 PM
I don't see how he didn't know it would create a stir, considering all the hype it generated when Tony Snow used the word a few months ago.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tar_baby
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: One Step Ahead on July 31, 2006, 04:21:51 PM
http://wcbstv.com/topstories/local_story_207104427.html

Dang we're starting kids early these days  :-\
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: crazy8 on July 31, 2006, 08:47:40 PM
Castro Relinquishes Power Before Surgery

By ANITA SNOW
The Associated Press
Monday, July 31, 2006; 11:43 PM

HAVANA -- Fidel Castro, who took control of Cuba in 1959, rebuffed repeated U.S. attempts to oust him and survived communism's demise almost everywhere else, temporarily relinquished his presidential powers to his brother Raul on Monday night because of surgery.

The Cuban leader said he had suffered gastrointestinal bleeding, apparently due to stress from recent public appearances in Argentina and Cuba, according to a letter read live on television by his secretary, Carlos Valenciaga.

"The operation obligates me to undertake several weeks of rest," said the letter. Extreme stress "had provoked in me a sharp intestinal crisis with sustained bleeding that obligated me to undergo a complicated surgical procedure."

Castro said he was temporarily relinquishing the presidency to his younger brother and successor Raul, the defense minister, but said the move was of "a provisional character." There was no immediate appearance or statement by Raul Castro.

It was the first time in his decades-long tenure that Castro has given up power, though he has been sidelined briefly in the recent past with occasional health problems.

The elder Castro asked that celebrations scheduled for his 80th birthday on Aug. 13 be postponed until Dec. 2, the 50th anniversary of Cuba's Revolutionary Armed Forces.

Castro said he would also temporarily delegate his duties as first secretary of the Communist Party of Cuba to Raul, who turned 75 in June and who has been taking on a more public profile in recent weeks.

In power since the triumph of the Cuban revolution on Jan. 1, 1959, Castro has been the world's longest-ruling head of government. Only Britain's Queen Elizabeth, crowned in 1952, has been head of state longer.

The "maximum leader's" ironclad rule has ensured Cuba remains among the world's five remaining communist countries. The others are all in Asia: China, Vietnam, Laos and North Korea.

In Old Havana, waiters at a popular cafe were momentarily stunned as they watched the news. But they quickly got back to work and put on brave faces.

"He'll get better, without a doubt," said Agustin Lopez, 40. "There are really good doctors here, and he's extremely strong."

In the nearby Plaza Vieja, Cuban musicians continued to play for customers _ primarily foreign tourists _ sitting at outdoor cafes. Signs on the plaza's colonial buildings put up during a recent Cuban holiday said, "Live on Fidel, for 80 more."

"We're really sad, and pretty shocked," said Ines Cesar, a retired 58-year-old metal worker who had gathered with neighbors to discuss the news. "But everyone's relaxed too: I think he'll be fine."

When asked about how she felt having Raul Castro at the helm of the nation, Cesar paused and said one word: "normal."

Over nearly five decades, hundreds of thousands of Cubans have fled Castro's rule, many of them settling just across the Florida Straits in Miami.

The announcement drew cheering in the streets in Miami. People waved Cuban flags on Little Havana's Calle Ocho, shouting "Cuba, Cuba, Cuba," hoping that the end is near for the man most of them consider to be a ruthless dictator. There were hugs, cheers and dancing as drivers honked their horns. Many of them fled the communist island or have parents and grandparents who did.

White House spokesman Peter Watkins said: "We are monitoring the situation. We can't speculate on Castro's health, but we continue to work for the day of Cuba's freedom." The State Department declined to comment Monday night.

Castro rose to power after an armed revolution he led drove out then-President Fulgencio Batista.

The United States was the first country to recognize Castro, but his radical economic reforms and rapid trials of Batista supporters quickly unsettled U.S. leaders.

Washington eventually slapped a trade embargo on the island and severed diplomatic ties. Castro seized American property and businesses and turned to the Soviet Union for military and economic assistance.

On April 16, 1961, Castro declared his revolution to be socialist. The following day, he humiliated the United States by capturing more than 1,100 exile soldiers in the Bay of Pigs invasion.

The world neared nuclear conflict on Oct. 22, 1962, when President John F. Kennedy announced there were Soviet nuclear missiles in Cuba. After a tense week of diplomacy, Soviet leader Nikita Krushchev removed them.

Meanwhile, Cuban revolutionaries opened 10,000 new schools, erased illiteracy, and built a universal health care system. Castro backed revolutionary movements in Latin America and Africa.

But former liberties were whittled away as labor unions lost the right to strike, independent newspapers were shut down and religious institutions were harassed.

Castro continually resisted U.S. demands for multiparty elections and an open economy despite American laws tightening the embargo in 1992 and 1996.

He characterized a U.S. plan for American aid in a post-Castro era as a thinly disguised attempt at regime change and insisted his socialist system would survive long after his death.

Fidel Castro Ruz was born in eastern Cuba, where his Spanish immigrant father ran a prosperous plantation. His official birthday is Aug. 13, 1926, although some say he was born a year later.

Talk of Castro's mortality was long taboo on the island, but that ended June 23, 2001, when he fainted during a speech in the sun. Although Castro quickly returned to the stage, many Cubans understood for the first time that their leader would one day die.

Castro shattered a kneecap and broke an arm when he fell after a speech on Oct. 20, 2004, but typically laughed off rumors about his health, most recently a 2005 report that he had Parkinson's disease.

"They have tried to kill me off so many times," Castro said in a November 2005 speech about the Parkinson's report, adding he felt "better than ever."

But the Cuban president also said he would not insist on remaining in power if he ever became too sick to lead: "I'll call the (Communist) Party and tell them I don't feel I'm in condition ... that please, someone take over the command."
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: 2Lacoste on August 01, 2006, 07:16:06 AM
Again, I assert that nobody reads (and certainly nobody discusses) articles put in this thread.  But to appease the commoners:

Feds appeal loss in NSA wiretap case
Bush administration asks the 9th Circuit to halt a lawsuit that accuses AT&T of illegally opening its network to the NSA.

By Declan McCullagh
Staff Writer, CNET News.com

The Bush administration has asked a federal appeals court to halt a lawsuit that accuses AT&T of illegally opening its communication networks to surveillance by the National Security Agency.

Permitting the Electronic Frontier Foundation's lawsuit to proceed would endanger national security and possibly expose classified information, the U.S. Department of Justice said in a legal brief filed on Monday.

The administration also nominated Laurence Silberman, a federal appeals court judge in Washington, D.C., to serve as an expert in this case. A former deputy attorney general, Silberman was appointed by President Reagan and serves on the secretive Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court of Review.

The brief is a response to a July 20 ruling by U.S. District Judge Vaughn Walker in San Francisco, who surprised lawsuit watchers by saying there are "sufficient" grounds to let the lawsuit continue.

"Because of the public disclosures by the government and AT&T, the court cannot conclude that merely maintaining this action creates a 'reasonable danger' of harming national security," Walker wrote.

In a 24-page brief filed on Monday, the Justice Department asked the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals to review the case because of the "serious risk" of disclosing sensitive information. "The district court has, in a highly unusual action, overruled the government's assertion of the state secrets privilege, and has thereby placed at risk particularly sensitive national security interests," the brief states.

In its class action lawsuit filed in January, the Electronic Frontier Foundation alleged that AT&T violated federal wiretapping laws by cooperating with the NSA. AT&T has declined to comment, although its attorneys have hinted that legal authorization exists. (In general, federal wiretapping law prohibits electronic surveillance "except as authorized by statute" or by the attorney general.)

After EFF's lawsuit was filed, reports of a secret room in an AT&T building in San Francisco surfaced and have become central to the nonprofit group's litigation.

A former AT&T employee, Mark Klein, has released documents alleging the company spliced its fiber optic cables and ran a duplicate set of cables to Room 641A at its 611 Folsom St. building. Redacted documents seen by CNET News.com show that AT&T has tried to offer benign reasons for the existence of such a room.

"State secrets" claim
The Bush administration has tried to derail the EFF's lawsuit by invoking the "state secrets" privilege and has submitted statements from Keith Alexander, the NSA's director, and John Negroponte, the director of national intelligence. The state secrets privilege generally permits the executive branch to dismiss lawsuits that could endanger the nation if allowed to proceed.

Those arguments worked before a federal judge in Chicago. On July 25, U.S. District Court Judge Matthew Kennelly granted the Justice Department's request to throw out another suit related to the NSA program brought by the American Civil Liberties Union.

But Walker, the judge in San Francisco, saw things differently in the EFF suit and ruled that "even the state secrets privilege has its limits." Although the state secrets privilege might require that the case be halted at some point, he said, it should not be tossed out of courts before it could even properly begin.

In his opinion (click here for PDF), Walker also said he was contemplating appointing an expert with security clearance to assist him in "determining whether disclosing particular evidence" would endanger national security.

The Justice Department opposes the idea (click here for PDF) but said that if an expert was necessary, Silberman is its choice.

For its part, the EFF nominated as an expert: Louis Fisher, who works at the Library of Congress; Michael Jacobs, a former NSA employee who is now a vice president at consulting firm SRA International; and Washington attorney Kenneth Bass, a court-appointed expert in a case dealing with classified documents.

The EFF's brief (click here for PDF), which argued against the government's request to halt proceedings while the appeal continues, said the selection of a court-appointed expert was appropriate.

Proposals to rewrite federal surveillance laws could, however, imperil the case if they are eventually adopted. Last week, a U.S. Senate committee heard testimony from the heads of the CIA and NSA who urged the adoption of a bill to expand the 1978 wiretapping law called the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act. It would expand the president's ability to conduct broad telephone and Internet surveillance with limited judicial oversight.

Also on Monday, Walker approved a request from CNET Networks (publisher of News.com) and the California First Amendment Coalition to file a friend-of-the-court brief. In May, CNET and other groups had opposed a request by AT&T to hold part of a hearing behind closed doors. Walker rejected the request.

Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: crazy8 on August 01, 2006, 07:19:50 AM
LOL.  I'm DEF. a "commoner" who reads them ALL!!  It's better than sifting through the newspaper   :D  If you give your opinion when you post, maybe it will start a discussion.  Otherwise, I figure it's being posted for everyone's reading pleasure. :D
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on August 01, 2006, 07:43:52 AM
Yep, duly read and noted.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on August 01, 2006, 07:47:17 AM
The administration also nominated Laurence Silberman, a federal appeals court judge in Washington, D.C., to serve as an expert in this case. A former deputy attorney general, Silberman was appointed by President Reagan and serves on the secretive Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court of Review.

He's an interesting guy.  Judged our spring moot court competition (http://www.yale.edu/mootcourt/).  Asked some interesting questions and gave good feedback.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: crazy8 on August 01, 2006, 07:47:34 AM
Think the Senate proposals to rewrite federal surveillance laws will pass? I'm about to read the Court's opinion and the briefs (love having time on my hands  8) ) but it seems like a weak argument to say that the case should be completely thrown out becuase of a possible national secuirty threat.  If the judge gets someone with clearance (and the govt. doesn't try to stop their clearance) to make sure that the threat isn't there, I dont' see what the problem is.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: 2Lacoste on August 01, 2006, 08:31:44 AM
Authorities arrest teens in ‘KKK’ incident

By Laura Followell
The Tribune-Star

Four teenagers have been arrested in connection with the scorching of the letters “KKK” into the lawn of a northside residence.

Sheriff Jon Marvel said tips to police led them to the four youths — boys ages 17, 16 and two who are 15 — all of whom have admitted their role in the incident many consider a hate crime based on race.

The 6-foot long letters were burned into the grass a week ago at the home belonging to Emanuel and Amelia Smith, who are black.

The suspects were arrested Wednesday at various locations. The first arrest occurred about 10 a.m., with the final suspect taken into custody at approximately 8 p.m.

The 17-year-old was preliminarily charged with arson, theft, trespass and mischief; the 16-year-old boy is accused of arson, trespass and mischief; and both 15-year-olds face preliminary charges of mischief and trespass.

The younger boys] were not directly involved in pouring gasoline,” Marvel said. “The [Sheriff’s] department had been working on it ever since it was reported by the victims. We received several tips through the THPD and Crime Stoppers, which ultimately led to these four suspects’ arrests.”

The suspects were transported to the juvenile center and are expected in court today.

The FBI has been involved in the case due to its nature, but no decision has been made on the filing of hate crime charges.

“None of them were charged with a hate crime right now,” Marvel said, but “that doesn’t preclude it. The agent will confer with the United States attorney for this district.”

The sheriff declined to discuss the suspects’ motive for allegedly burning the letters into the family’s lawn.

The Smiths could not be reached for comment prior to press time.

Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: 2Lacoste on August 01, 2006, 09:39:53 AM
I, for one, have never come across a game in which you get points for "how many women you rape." 

U.S. judge throws out Minnesota video game law
Statute violates free speech, unsupported by research

BY SHANNON PRATHER
Pioneer Press

A federal judge on Monday shot down a Minnesota law that would fine youngsters who get their hands on the smuttiest, bloodiest and most violent video games.

The law, which was scheduled to take effect today, would have docked youths $25 for renting or buying video games an industry board rates "mature" or "adults only." It also would have required stores to post signs warning underage gamers about the fine.

Passed in May, the law was aimed to protect game players younger than 17. Backers pointed to games such as "God of War," in which players gouge out eyes, sever limbs and make human sacrifices, and "Manhunt," in which a serial killer uses a nail gun and chain saw to slay victims.

The video game industry sued to block the law in June, arguing it violated constitutional rights of game makers and customers.

Minnesota's law is the latest to fall after a court challenge. The video industry claims an undefeated record after knocking out statutes across the country, including those in Wisconsin, Illinois, Michigan and California.

"We are pleased that the court has so quickly overturned this ill-conceived law," said Bo Andersen, president of the Entertainment Merchants Association, one of the plaintiffs in the case.

U.S. District Judge James Rosenbaum ruled that the law violated free-speech rights. He also concluded research failed to back up the state's claims that the law would protect the psychological well being of youngsters and foster their moral and ethical development.

"The state itself acknowledges … that it is entirely incapable of showing a causal link between the playing of video games and any deleterious effect on the psychological, moral, or ethical well-being of minors," Rosenbaum wrote.

Rosenbaum said that even if the state could come up with the research to prove harm, the law was not narrowly tailored enough to pass constitutional muster.

Attorney General Mike Hatch said he will consider appealing the ruling.

"There are psychologists who believe the reward mechanism of more points, more games and higher levels of play in video games condition children to be rewarded by reenacting violence in the real world," Hatch said.

One St. Paul lawmaker said she wants the Legislature to craft another law next session.

"The whole ruling defied common sense. I am so disappointed," said bill sponsor Sen. Sandy Pappas, DFL-St. Paul.

"The federal court said we don't have a right to protect our children, but we protect our children from other things. We don't let them smoke or buy liquor."

Pappas said the judge's conclusion that the current body of research didn't show violent video games harm children and teens defies logic.

"You score points for how many women you rape, how many cops you kill," Pappas said. "How could that not affect them psychologically? "

The video game industry has said its voluntary rating system — like those for movies, television and music — does not infringe on free-speech rights but still lets parents control what their kids play. The Entertainment Software Rating Board assigns one of six ratings to each video game, ranging from "early childhood" to "adults only."

Given the court's ruling, bill sponsor Rep. Jeff Johnson, R-Plymouth, said he might try a different approach next session.

"I don't know if we could go and craft different legislation that would be more narrowly tailored," Johnson said. "Maybe the next step is just outside of legislation."

Informing parents, he said, might be more effective.

David Walsh, president of the Minneapolis-based National Institute on Media and the Family said the Tuesday ruling came as no surprise given the video game industry's winning record in court. He said education and public pressure is ultimately how parents will force change.

"While we might be tempted to wish for a legislative solution, the real solution has to be education, which is what we've been advocating for years," Walsh said.

"Parents need to be media wise and watch what our kids watch. We can't always look to law to solve this problem."

Several parents at GameStop, a video game store in St. Paul's Midway neighborhood, said they are concerned about violent games.

Eileen O'Connell-Conzet of St. Paul, who brought her 7-year-old son, Will, to the store for the first video game he could purchase with his own money, said she was disappointed the new law was ruled unconstitutional.

"I believe vendors have the right to sell what they want," she said. "But if they do, they also have responsibilities to families."

Chris Yang of Ham Lake, a father of five, said he believes video games are only a counterpart to the kind of teenage and young-adult movies that emphasize violence, gore and sex.

"I'm really concerned about it," he said. "Violence and fighting is different from games about serial killers and gory dismemberment. But that's where movies and games are going."

Yang said he was ambivalent about the law.

"I believe the games aren't good for kids, especially the ones that are violent," he said. "The problem is, they're awful fun to play."
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: faith2005 on August 01, 2006, 11:47:09 AM
thought this was interesting. although a few things shelby steele says make sense, I still think in some ways he sounds like uncle ruckus. I heard in the MLK episode he said, "if i hadn't known that the white man had such good aim, i would have shot dr. king myself." and strangely, shelby steele makes civil rights leaders out to be poverty pimps. and only the most high knws why he didn't understand what male private part gregory meant by "be hip" and "raise your consciousness" lol.

The Debilitating Effects of Rights Without Responsibility
Commentary
BY FRED SIEGEL
August 1, 2006
URL: http://www.nysun.com/article/37122

Cornel West, the celebrity African-American studies professor, delivers the conventional wisdom when he talks about how the "rage and riots of the 1960s produced America's landmark civil rights legislation." In fact, the legislation preceded the riots. The question of why and how the opposite of the truth became a commonplace belief is at the heart of Shelby Steele's psychologically brilliant "White Guilt: How Blacks and Whites Together Destroyed the Promise of the Civil Rights Era" (HarperCollins, 192 pages, $24.95).

"White Guilt" is an autobiographical meditation on why a significant portion of the black population hasn't been able to take advantage of the freedoms that belatedly came to it. Mr. Steele, one of our most respected writers on the vexed issues of race, notes that in the segregated post-World War II world, his striving father was accused of "getting above himself." "Responsibility," Mr. Steele writes,"made fools of us," because society quite literally labored to defeat his father's ambition, even as it left him entirely responsible for his life and family.

In the wake of the 1960s, Mr. Steele explains, the segregated world of responsibility without rights was replaced for blacks by a framework of rights without responsibility.In this reversal, the morally indefensible world of segregation was succeeded not by the responsibility that comes with freedom, but by the destructive assumption, according to Mr. Steele, that African-Americans shouldn't be held accountable for their actions.

"One has to be grateful to white guilt," he notes, "for bringing about possibly the greatest social transformation in American history." But it overshot its mark. The same tide that swept away segregation also took away the institutions and attitudes essential to thriving in freedom.

Whites, in what Mr. Steele calls "disassociation," strived to separate themselves from what became the stigma of racial bias.But in doing penance for the sins of racism, too many were more concerned with demonstrating their moral purity than with the actual results their policies produced. Good intentions were supposed to be enough.

What followed under the guise of eliminating "institutional racism" was the "redistribution of responsibility." Under this new dispensation, blacks as a group were considered no more the agents of their own destiny than they had been under slavery. What was different was that their suffering could be converted into political capital and social spending. And the answer to failed social spending was always more social spending.

Failure would only serve as further proof of black victimization, because race, several generations of academics and journalists explained, "was not a mere barrier but the all-determining reality" in which blacks lived.

Mr. Steele remembers a speech he heard in 1967 by the comedian male private part Gregory, who called on his black audience to "get hip" and "raise your consciousness."Thinking back, Mr. Steele realizes that he was witnessing the birth of what might be called hipster Marxism. The hipster knows the game is rigged but tries to subvert it to his own advantage. Here was an opportunity that most tricksters could only dream of, a chance, Mr. Steele explains, "for working over the master for the rube that he is."

Like mayors selling poverty to Washington,"the black leadership sold black weakness" to guilty whites looking to buy their redemption.The race hustlers claimed that there were separate "black ways of knowing" and "fad after fad like Ebonics" was an attempt to circumvent the hard work necessary for upward mobility. The idea of free will was taken by university sophisticates to be "largely a delusion of the common man, a kitschy individualism that Americans like to flatter themselves with." But the determinism was always a game on both sides since the sophisticates saw it as only applying to others.

The black leadership asserted that since racist America has been "responsible for our suffering, why not for our uplift?" But that made no sense logically.How can rest you hopes on whites after having insisted that they are all bred-to-the-bone racists? The answer, Mr. Steele argues, is that the black leadership sold forgiveness to guilty whites, who would turn a blind eye even as black leaders were bilking their own people (as was the case with numerous black mayors).

The role of the race card in sabotaging black-led cities is vividly depicted by two of the best documentary films in recent years.In "Shame of a City,"Tigre Hill captures Philadelphia's "O.J. Moment," when the incumbent mayor, an African-American, John Street, manufactured a racist conspiracy in order to salvage his sagging re-election campaign against a Republican reformer, Sam Katz. The opening scenes capture a thuggish Mr. Street, then a council member, shoving an black reporter out of his office for asking tough questions about his questionable ethics. Mr. Street, famous for a brawl in the City Council chambers, developed a smoother style as mayor. But the substance of his approach changed little.

Mr. Street publicly explained that people who wanted to do business with the city would have to "pay to play." Many businesses chose not to pay the bribes, and Philadelphia under Mr. Street barely benefited from the Clinton boom of the 1990s.

In 2003, Mr. Street was up for re-election and was losing by 6 percentage points to Mr. Katz. Mr. Street outed himself by announcing that he had "discovered" an FBI bug in his office. The Bureau was probing the city's rich vein of corruption, which would eventually lead to a slew of convictions.

But Mr. Street, who was too adroit to get caught, spun the bug into a massive racist Republican conspiracy to keep down a black man. Without being heavy-handed, Mr. Hill provides viewers with a front seat for Mr. Street's performance as a wily trickster. Once trailing, Mr. Street went on to an easy victory, while Philadelphia and its largely black population continued their slow slide downhill.

The more hopeful story of a city that may have begun to break with the race game is told by Marshall Curry's "Street Fight," nominated for an Academy Award in 2005. It captures the 2002 mayor's race in Newark, N.J. — a campaign in which Sharpe James, an oldstyle political boss in the mold of Mr. Street, defeated an upstart reform Democrat, Cory Booker. Though Mr. Booker came back in 2006 to win the mayor's job and defeat the James machine, Mr. Curry's narrative is an instructive reminder of how the race card can be played even against someone of the same race. To create his own twisted version of the white conspiracy to hold the black man down, Mr. James made an issue of the light skin of the 32-year-old Stanford-educated Mr. Booker, suggesting he wasn't really black. On camera, Mr. James "played a tale" on Mr. Booker, claiming that the challenger was both "Jewish" and a "KKKer."

Mr. Curry's camera documents some of the many attempts by Mr. James and his police force to prevent him from filming on public property. In one scene, a Newark police officer explains, "You've been hanging with Cory; he's not our guy," as the police "escort" the filmmaker away from a rally for Mr. James. Mr. James made good use of intimidation. He used code violations to close down businesses that supported Mr. Booker, while his police force was openly tearing down posters for Mr. Booker.

Mr. James himself, however, had not been held down.With three homes, several boats, and a small fortune, he had done quite well off the race game, even if the blacks of Newark had not.

There is an old joke in Newark that "the only way an incumbent leaves office is in a casket or to go to jail." But if Mr. Booker's term as mayor is a success, his 2006 victory could begin to revise that cynicism. Better yet, it suggests that the tricksters, so adept at the gaming of race, whose debilitating effects Mr. Steele describes, may now have fewer cards to play.

Mr. Siegel is the author of "The Prince of the City: Giuliani, New York and the Genius of American Life," available from Encounter Books.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: scurred1 on August 01, 2006, 12:03:35 PM
Interesting article. I read Shelby Steele's latest book. I don't agree entirely with his philosophy but some of it is illuminating. It's unfortunate that a lot of people discount all of what he says because he has conservative views.

I totally agree with his point that some opportunistic Blacks have used racism as some sort of currency with whites who seek to appear morally superior and/or who fear being branded racist. That sort of BS has hurt Black folks so much and it needs to stop.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: crazy8 on August 01, 2006, 09:25:48 PM
Having worked on a plethora of pro bono asylum cases that were appealed to circuit courts, This article serves true.

Seeking Asylum in the U.S.? Choose Your Judge Carefully
Tuesday, August 1, 2006


Immigration judges vary sharply in their willingness to grant asylum to foreigners seeking to live in the United States -- with denial rates ranging from 10 percent to more than 98 percent, according to a review of federal figures.

From fiscal 2000 through the first months of fiscal 2005, Judge Mahlon F. Hanson in Miami had the highest proportion of denials, rejecting 96.7 percent of petitioners in 1,118 cases in which the asylum seeker had a lawyer.

The study, which was released yesterday, is based on data from the Justice Department's Executive Office for Immigration Review, which oversees immigration courts, for 1994-99 and 2000-05. The report was done by the Transactional Records Access Clearinghouse, which collects and analyzes federal government data.

New York Judge Margaret McManus rejected just 0.8 percent of her 1,638 cases in which the asylum seeker had a lawyer. The median denial rate was 65 percent.

She and Hanson have contrasting backgrounds: Hanson had worked for the now-defunct Immigration and Naturalization Service. McManus was a staff lawyer with the Legal Aid Society's immigration unit.

"The goal of any court system is evenhanded justice," said Susan Long, a Syracuse University professor and co-director of the clearinghouse. "The results certainly raise questions about whether that goal is being achieved."

Attorney General Alberto R. Gonzales began a review of the immigration courts in January after chastising some of the immigration judges for "intemperate or even abusive" conduct toward asylum seekers. Department spokesman Charles Miller said the review is continuing.

The study said the court data "document that this problem has existed for at least a decade and that it persists even when the applicants being compared appear to be quite similar."

The United States grants asylum to people who could be persecuted in their countries because of race, religion, nationality, membership in a particular social group or political opinion. Asylum was granted to 13,520 people in 2005, according to Citizenship and Immigration Services statistics.

Rates were worse for asylum seekers without lawyers: 93 percent lost their cases compared with 64 percent for those with a lawyer. The denial rate for all asylum seekers was 69 percent.

People from El Salvador, Haiti and Mexico were denied asylum 80 percent of the time; asylum seekers from Afghanistan and Burma were denied asylum 30 percent of the time.

Previous studies have shown similar disparities suggesting a lack of standards for judges, said Gideon Aronoff, president of the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society. He said success in asylum claims is a matter of "luck of the draw."


Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Inquirer on August 02, 2006, 07:08:25 AM
I saw this on XOXO (and it's pretty old), but it made sense to post it here...
YOUNG, BLACK AND TOO WHITE...

ONCE EXCLUSIONARY BASTIONS OF THE NEGRO ELITE, BLACK SOCIAL CLUBS FOR KIDS ARE MAKING A COMEBACK AMONG MIDDLE-CLASS PARENTS WHO FEAR THEIR CHILDREN ARE LOSING THEIR ROOTS.

BY KAREN GRIGSBY BATES

It is Sunday afternoon and I am dressed in high heels, pearls and yellow silk in 80-degree weather, sitting on a hard chair talking with several women I do not know. We are gathered at the home of our hostess, a mother of three, to do what I couldn't imagine myself doing until recently: We are being prepped for initiation in Jack and Jill, a national organization for black children. More than 30 years after the crescendo of the civil rights movement, I am doing this to ensure my 6-year-old son has enough black friends.

It's a paradox that would have made Martin Luther King Jr. laugh -- or perhaps wince. After the decades the previous generations spent battering down the doors to segregated institutions, the first generation of those civil rights beneficiaries -- us -- has grown up, and we now have children of our own. Per the plan, we are living lives that are extremely integrated. Maybe (and here's where the wincing comes in) too integrated.

"She talks like a little white girl," one friend complained of her adolescent daughter. "She assumes that everyone lives the way we do. I've got to get her more grounded." The daughter in question attends an expensive private school, vacations abroad and swims in the family's backyard pool in a suburban neighborhood heavy on the standard accouterments of the upper middle class and light on minorities.

Another friend regaled us with a recent scene from her dinner table: "My husband and I were talking about corporate politics -- he's the only black partner in his law firm -- and concluding that race might have had something to do with what had gone on in the office that day. Our 14-year-old daughter just exploded. 'You people -- you think everything is about race! You should just get a grip! People are not prejudiced like that anymore!'" My friend paused. "She was just screaming at us, and she was serious. She thinks racism is kaput. We didn't know whether to burst her bubble right then or let her find out later, on her own." (They decided to let her make this discovery on her own.)
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Inquirer on August 02, 2006, 07:08:48 AM

The irony, of course, is this: A whole raft of us -- black, gifted, ambitious -- did what the architects of the civil rights movement would have wished. We stormed the bastions, convinced (or at least impressed) the skeptics and performed competitively in educational venues that had not long before been forbidden to us. We went on to be the Lonely Onlies, many of us in workplaces that had heretofore been white -- or that had never had a black manager, editor, head resident, faculty member. We married, usually to people who had had experiences much like our own, and had children. And thanks to the slow death of restrictive residential covenants, overall increased interest in multicultural living and the expanded incomes that those good jobs afforded us, we sent our children to elite schools or moved to affluent, often suburban neighborhoods that were Safer, with More Advantages.

And then we began to notice that our kids weren't, well, as black as we had been. Whether we'd grown up in the 'hood or had integrated suburbs, we had been grounded, if not in black neighborhoods, then by the black churches to which most of us returned every Sunday. If the schools we were integrating didn't teach black history and culture, our Sunday school teachers made sure those critical gaps were filled -- packed to bursting, in fact. So along with the proverbs and parables, we learned about how the DAR refused to let Miss Anderson sing in its old building, and how her friend Eleanor Roosevelt hooked her up for a milestone concert at the Lincoln Memorial on Easter Sunday. We learned about the contributions of Charles Drew and Paul Robeson and Paul Lawrence Dunbar and Constance Baker Motley. If our hometown papers politely neglected to mention the war against segregation being waged in the South, our Sunday school teachers kept us current and passed the felt-bottomed plate so we could contribute to the struggle too. ("Those little children in Mississippi and Alabama are fighting for your freedom too," they would tell us. "Don't you think you could give up your candy money to help out?" Out would come the coins, bound for freedom schools.)

If Sunday school gave us a sense of community and history, Jack and Jill gave us a sense of place. There was a hidden agenda when we nice Negro children got together once a month for fun and fellowship. Even as we took our monthly excursions, the cultural message was hammered into us: Black is not just ghetto. Black is not socially or aesthetically inferior. Black is vital to American culture. In addition to picnics, movies and parties, we visited museums to admire works by black artists and dutifully trooped to hear Andre Watts in concert -- "one of ours," a supervising mother would gently but unfailingly point out.

Initially started almost 60 years ago by 20 black mothers in Philadelphia who were anxious that their privileged children have black playmates, the organization quickly blossomed. Today it embraces 216 chapters across the nation, in 35 states and the District of Columbia. There is even an international chapter in Germany. Then, as now, mothers gathered monthly to plan activities for their age-grouped children. The charter requires that these activities be educational, fun and/or culturally uplifting -- but they also had the unstated purpose of making sure that these children teetering on the edge of Total Integration would not fall and be lost, perhaps forever. "We are sending you out into Their World," was the message, "but we want you to remember where Home is too."

It worked. For children fighting their way through the pressure cooker of educational integration, Jack and Jill was a godsend. I spent my days playing field hockey, conjugating French verbs, reading Wordsworth and Tennyson (never Hurston and Ellison), the Only One in my class at a prim girls' day school. I had friendly relationships with many girls, but no truly good friends. My good friends came from the neighborhood, and from Jack and Jill. And because of that, I remembered where Home was.

I am not so sure my child will -- or perhaps it's more accurate to say I don't want to chance that he won't. Given the state of Los Angeles public schools and the impossibility of decoding what needs to be done to gain entry into the fully subscribed magnet system, it's likely that he'll spend his entire pre-college years in nominally integrated private schools, because the choice is that stark. I want him to have experiences that are self-affirming, and even the most liberal private schools cannot protect against the assumptions of superiority that are sometimes voiced by white students and their parents.

It was the stories told in muffled voices by parents saddened but not shocked to find that their children aren't being judged solely by the content of their character that made me decide. The one black boy in his circle who did not get invited to his "best friend's" birthday party. (And whose mother, when confronted about the exclusion, could only stammer, "I'm sure race didn't have anything to do with it." Uh-huh.) The 8-year-old who agonizes over her dark skin because it's different from that of "the pretty girls" in her class. The white child from a liberal, wealthy family who thought he was complimenting a black honor student when he asked, "Why is it black people never say anything intelligent? Except for you, of course; you're different."

It's because we know these slings and arrows are going to whiz at our children, no matter how we try to protect them, that Jack and Jill is becoming fashionable again. Once it was seen as an exclusionary bastion of the Negro elite, to the point that admitting to membership was considered certifiably counterrevolutionary in the late '60s and early '70s. (This even though some of the most avid revolutionaries on Ivy League campuses were Jack and Jill alumni -- although they'd rather be shot than 'fess up.) Now it's viewed as just another tool, another safeguard, to keep black children with more and more options outside the black community culturally grounded.

"My child is 14," confided the woman sitting next to me. She was slim and elegant in a navy pantsuit and queenly cornrows. "His school is fairly integrated -- I mean, he's not the only one -- but I want him to have other children as friends too. Right now, his best friend is white, and I'm fine with that. But I worry about the future." She means when her son is dating age and all of a sudden, the groupings get to be more homogenous and the kids who are "different" find themselves excluded, or included as cultural mascots, badges of white hipness.

A neighbor whose child is in a Hollywood-heavy school empathizes with the Jack and Jill initiate's worry: "Here I've been, Afrocentric all his life, pointing out the beauty of black women, the importance of black culture. We vacation in Africa and the Caribbean, in part so he can go somewhere and feel what it's like to be the majority culture. And after all that, who does he bring home as a steady girlfriend? Some little blond girl! I don't want to be prejudiced, and I'm trying to live with it, but it's hard."

Although Jack and Jill is the oldest and most established of the social organizations for children, it's not the only one. A rival, Hansel and Gretel, has several chapters nationwide. And across the country, black parents are struggling to establish informal, local groups that address the same need. Here in Los Angeles, a group of concerned parents got together to found Onyx Village. Many of the parent members are in the entertainment industry -- LaTonya Richardson Jackson, actress and wife of Samuel L., is one of the founders. They live incontestably affluent lives, often in neighborhoods where black children have to be ferried to visit one another. The group meets monthly to inculcate children with black culture and history, and to provide them with an additional circle of friends who just happen to be, in the words of poet Lorraine Hansberry, young, gifted and black.

It's for those same reasons that many of my friends hasten back to Martha's Vineyard every summer. One lifelong summer resident confided as we sat on the beach several summers ago: "It's important for our kids to have some time where they can all run around together and see that black is many things -- not just what they see in the movies or on TV. Black Ph.D.s, M.D.s, artists, bankers -- all those folk are just as real and just as black as rap stars and professional athletes. Is it convenient to come here? No. Is it essential? Yes."

Which brings me back to why I was dressed in stockings and silk on a beautiful day when I could have been doing something else. Was it convenient for me to join Jack and Jill, with its labor-intensive mother's committees and onerous dues? No. Is it essential? That answer is still, I'm afraid, yes.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on August 02, 2006, 07:15:23 AM
Ah, the trials and travails of the Black and Successful.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: scurred1 on August 02, 2006, 07:34:49 AM
LOL! I hope someone will have mercy and shoot me if I EVER come off sounding as self-important as the writer of that article.

Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: pikey on August 02, 2006, 07:38:48 AM
I think it's a good article.  It touches on something that I've observed about many 'priveleged' black kids. It's an issue that worries me for my (future) kids.  Growing up on an island that's 60% black, I attended mostly black public schools and churches.  I saw plenty of sucessful black people, including our premier (head of govt).  I know who I am, but that racism exists and white privelage exists.  Contrast that with family friends whose father is Bermudian, but his daughters grew up in an Atlanta suburb.  They're about my age, but seem to think that racism doesn't exist and that life is all well and good.

My parents made sure that we know who we are and where we come from, and hopefully my kids will be grounded in that.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on August 02, 2006, 07:43:38 AM
I agree with MoniLi.  I've just accepted the fact that my kids are going to have to participate in these kinds of programs.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: crazy8 on August 02, 2006, 07:46:19 AM
I haven't read the entire article, but are you saying thta you are going to have your kids participate in jack and jill?
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on August 02, 2006, 07:50:55 AM
Why not?
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: crazy8 on August 02, 2006, 07:52:26 AM
Why not?

To each his own.  Since some of ya'll might have participated in these types of programs, I won't say anything about it, other than my kids won't be doing it.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: pikey on August 02, 2006, 07:52:44 AM
I haven't read the entire article, but are you saying thta you are going to have your kids participate in jack and jill?

Not necessarily Jack and Jill.  It depends on where I end up and the resources in the area.  Ideally I would like to live in a diverse neighborhood and for my kids to attend a good, diverse, public school.  Obviously this is easier said than done.

Barring that, I would find some way for them to interact regularly with other black children.  It might be through church, a community group, children of my friends, or through a group such as jack and jill.  I don't want my kids to arrive at a PWI that's 10% black and say that this is the most black people they've seen in their life.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on August 02, 2006, 07:53:40 AM
Why not?

To each his own.  Since some of ya'll might have participated in these types of programs, I won't say anything about it, other than my kids won't be doing it.

No, I'm curious to hear your opinion.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: pikey on August 02, 2006, 07:54:35 AM
Why not?

To each his own.  Since some of ya'll might have participated in these types of programs, I won't say anything about it, other than my kids won't be doing it.

Just out of curiousity, do you feel that it is important for your kids to interact with other black kids?  If so, how do you plan to accomplish that?
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on August 02, 2006, 07:56:08 AM
I don't want my kids to arrive at a PWI that's 10% black and say that this is the most black people they've seen in their life.

Lol.  I grew up in a town of 3k...that was the most black people I'd seen in my life on a regular basis!
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: crazy8 on August 02, 2006, 08:05:13 AM
I just find those programs to be pretentious and wouldn't have my kids engage in them.  I also don't plan on raising my kids in a predominantly white area (ideally).  Unless I'm living in DC  :D, they'll be attending public school.

I don't think you have to raise your kids in a predominantly white area in order for them to turn out well, and then put them in programs like jack and jill so that they know black people.  Those aren't "regular" black people (again, speaking from the perspective of knowing people who did it), and it still isolates them from the black community imo.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on August 02, 2006, 08:07:06 AM
Yeah, they won't be "regular" black people.  But hopefully they'll be exposed to "regular" black people in church.  I can't think of any non-school social activities that would do so.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: 2Lacoste on August 02, 2006, 08:10:59 AM
I never even heard of Jack and Jill and similar programs until a recent discussion of them on this board.  I think I'll put my kids into a program like that if I feel it is worthwhile (would have to do more homework as to the nature of the program, the people, the leadership).  I'm still deciding if I'm going to put my kids into private prep schools or public.  I did public all my life but I wouldn't necessarily say, "it served me well."
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on August 02, 2006, 08:13:02 AM
I'll do public in a heartbeat if I live in a wealthy school district.  But if I live in DC, ATL, or NYC (the 3 most likely places), no way.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: pikey on August 02, 2006, 08:13:43 AM
I just find those programs to be pretentious and wouldn't have my kids engage in them.  I also don't plan on raising my kids in a predominantly white area (ideally).  Unless I'm living in DC  :D, they'll be attending public school.

I don't think you have to raise your kids in a predominantly white area in order for them to turn out well, and then put them in programs like jack and jill so that they know black people.  Those aren't "regular" black people (again, speaking from the perspective of knowing people who did it), and it still isolates them from the black community imo.

Like I said earlier, a black (or diverse) neighborhood is the ideal, but Jack and Jill or the like is the backup.  Plus, they'll spend summers with their grandparents and cousin in Bermuda (and maybe Jamica), so they'll have that exposure as well.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: crazy8 on August 02, 2006, 08:14:02 AM
In high school, my mom "forced" me to tutor at an after-school program for high-risk kids.  I fed the homeless every Thanksgiving, and handed out gifts to those in need (some of these people attended my school).  I consider those regular black people.

When I went to college, there were few blacks, but we sought each other out.  Most of us weren't pretentious (those that were got knocked down to reality over time).  I felt pretty in touch with the black commuity though there was a slight majority of whites and I didn't need jack and jill to do it.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: 2Lacoste on August 02, 2006, 08:15:50 AM
I'll do public in a heartbeat if I live in a wealthy school district.  But if I live in DC, ATL, or NYC (the 3 most likely places), no way.


I figure I'll do the same thing.  If the local (public) schools are top-notch then my children will attend.  If not, then prep school it is.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Inquirer on August 02, 2006, 08:17:07 AM
I just find those programs to be pretentious and wouldn't have my kids engage in them.  I also don't plan on raising my kids in a predominantly white area (ideally).  Unless I'm living in DC  :D, they'll be attending public school.

I don't think you have to raise your kids in a predominantly white area in order for them to turn out well, and then put them in programs like jack and jill so that they know black people.  Those aren't "regular" black people (again, speaking from the perspective of knowing people who did it), and it still isolates them from the black community imo.

You would send your children to D.C. public schools ?!?!?  :o

*If I stay here or move to D.C., I'd live in a nice "Black" neighborhood, but my kids will most definitely be attending private schools. *

Other than that sending your kids to public schools though, I sorta understand what you're saying. However, if you are affluent,  exposing your children to other affluent Black kids might be a good thing.  They'd get to know that they aren't all that different than some other Black people and possibly make great friends/connections at the same time.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: crazy8 on August 02, 2006, 08:20:56 AM
no Inquirer, that's my pt, I wouldn't send my kids to DC public school.  Unless I live in DC, they'll be in public school.  I'm a product of a public school education, and I think I turned out pretty well. 

What is the reason to have your kids in programs like Jack & Jill, to expose them to black people?  I'm sorry but I think that causes them to perpetuate the belief that black people are like them...privileged.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: 2Lacoste on August 02, 2006, 08:27:09 AM
no Inquirer, that's my pt, I wouldn't send my kids to DC public school.  Unless I live in DC, they'll be in public school.  I'm a product of a public school education, and I think I turned out pretty well. 

What is the reason to have your kids in programs like Jack & Jill, to expose them to black people?  I'm sorry but I think that causes them to perpetuate the belief that black people are like them...privileged.


Or it could cause them to understand that just because they are Black doesn't mean they have to act a certain way -- like they have no class/are from the streets.  You have to find a happy balance.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on August 02, 2006, 08:30:04 AM
no Inquirer, that's my pt, I wouldn't send my kids to DC public school.  Unless I live in DC, they'll be in public school.  I'm a product of a public school education, and I think I turned out pretty well. 

What is the reason to have your kids in programs like Jack & Jill, to expose them to black people?  I'm sorry but I think that causes them to perpetuate the belief that black people are like them...privileged.


Or it could cause them to understand that just because they are Black doesn't mean they have to act a certain way -- like they have no class/are from the streets.  You have to find a happy balance.

Yeah, it's important to expose them to both.  They will be moving among the elite circles, so they need to know how to interact with the elite.  Yet, they shouldn't lose their perspective.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: pikey on August 02, 2006, 08:30:28 AM
no Inquirer, that's my pt, I wouldn't send my kids to DC public school.  Unless I live in DC, they'll be in public school.  I'm a product of a public school education, and I think I turned out pretty well. 

What is the reason to have your kids in programs like Jack & Jill, to expose them to black people?  I'm sorry but I think that causes them to perpetuate the belief that black people are like them...privileged.

I think there are two different issues here, making friends and giving back to the community.  I want my kids to do both.  In your previous post, all of your examples were about giving back (tutoring, helping the homeless, etc), but you never mentioned anything about being friends with 'regular' black people until maybe college.

Kids can attend jack and jill and meet other 'privileged' black kids and attend church or volunteer with 'regular' black kids.  A kid from a 'priveleged' background will probably identify more with another 'priveleged' black kid, so it's important that they have exposure to people from all walks of life.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Inquirer on August 02, 2006, 08:31:54 AM
no Inquirer, that's my pt, I wouldn't send my kids to DC public school.  Unless I live in DC, they'll be in public school.  I'm a product of a public school education, and I think I turned out pretty well. 

What is the reason to have your kids in programs like Jack & Jill, to expose them to black people?  I'm sorry but I think that causes them to perpetuate the belief that black people are like them...privileged.

Oh okay -- I wasn't reading right. Thanks for making it plain for me.  I was in educated in public schools as well (after third grade), so I don't plan on going out of my way to send my children to private schools either...

The purpose of Jack & Jill isn't simply to expose the children to Black people, b/c they can get that by going to the mall in the right area.  The purpose is to expose them to a certain kind of Black people (and it's clearly a networking opp. for the mothers) so that the kids can see that they aren't the only Black kids who are privileged.  

From what I understand, some of the Jack & Jill groups do community service and outreach work, just to make sure the kids don't lose perspective on the plight of Black America.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: crazy8 on August 02, 2006, 08:36:59 AM
[Or it could cause them to understand that just because they are Black doesn't mean they have to act a certain way -- like they have no class/are from the streets.  You have to find a happy balance.

I didn't do it, and I still understood how I should act.



Yeah, it's important to expose them to both.  They will be moving among the elite circles, so they need to know how to interact with the elite.  Yet, they shouldn't lose their perspective.

Oh okay, I guess I don't imagine the friends I have and the new friends I will acquire elite.  Though we're all doing the damn thing none of us consider ourselves elite/privileged.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: crazy8 on August 02, 2006, 08:39:30 AM
no Inquirer, that's my pt, I wouldn't send my kids to DC public school.  Unless I live in DC, they'll be in public school.  I'm a product of a public school education, and I think I turned out pretty well. 

What is the reason to have your kids in programs like Jack & Jill, to expose them to black people?  I'm sorry but I think that causes them to perpetuate the belief that black people are like them...privileged.

I think there are two different issues here, making friends and giving back to the community.  I want my kids to do both.  In your previous post, all of your examples were about giving back (tutoring, helping the homeless, etc), but you never mentioned anything about being friends with 'regular' black people until maybe college.

Kids can attend jack and jill and meet other 'privileged' black kids and attend church or volunteer with 'regular' black kids.  A kid from a 'priveleged' background will probably identify more with another 'priveleged' black kid, so it's important that they have exposure to people from all walks of life.

I was friends with a lot of white people growing up, but my closest friends were black.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on August 02, 2006, 08:41:35 AM
Oh okay, I guess I don't imagine the friends I have and the new friends I will acquire elite.  Though we're all doing the damn thing none of us consider ourselves elite/privileged.

Irrespective of what you consider yourselves, you are or will be elite.  And there are certain conventions that are difficult to pick up on if you're not regularly exposed to other people of your social class.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: crazy8 on August 02, 2006, 08:46:24 AM
Like I said ya'll for each his own.  One of my best friends (met in college) did Jack and Jill.  I love her to death but she's pretentious as hell, out of touch with the black community, and a Republican  ;D  She has very few black friends, and doesn't really know how to relate to them (would go as far as to say she thinks she's better than them).

I'm sure ya'll can tell from my personality that I'm not a fan of elitism and Talented 10th because it tends to make us more devicive as black people.  Ok I'm gonna finish reading the article.


Irrespective of what you consider yourselves, you are or will be elite.  And there are certain conventions that are difficult to pick up on if you're not regularly exposed to other people of your social class.

Not true if you have good parents who make sure you don't act a fool and that you speak properly.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on August 02, 2006, 08:50:14 AM
Like I said ya'll for each his own.  One of my best friends (met in college) did Jack and Jill.  I love her to death but she's pretentious as hell, out of touch with the black community, and a Republican  ;D  She has very few black friends, and doesn't really know how to relate to them (would go as far as to say she thinks she's better than them).

Lol, maybe Jack and Jill softened the effects, not worsened them.  She might not have talked to any black people without Jack and Jill ;).

Quote

Irrespective of what you consider yourselves, you are or will be elite.  And there are certain conventions that are difficult to pick up on if you're not regularly exposed to other people of your social class.

Not true if you have good parents who make sure you don't act a fool and that you speak properly.

Yeah, good parenting is key.  But I think there are some things you learn only by observing others in similar situations.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Inquirer on August 02, 2006, 08:53:28 AM
Yeah, good parenting is key.  But I think there are some things you learn only by observing others in similar situations.

I agree w/ that
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: crazy8 on August 02, 2006, 09:14:58 AM
Ok I read the article in its entirety and one of the ladies had me when she said her son brought home a white girl  :D  Now if my son ever decides to do that, it better be because he's seen more than enough black women and none of them seem to meet his mamma's standards  :D

I don't know what kind of neighborhood my kids will end up in, but I'll try my darndest to find a better way to expose them to blacks other than J&J. But I guess if push comes to shove (i.e., son brings home a white girl)..... ;D
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: pikey on August 02, 2006, 09:25:42 AM
Ok I read the article in its entirety and one of the ladies had me when she said her son brought home a white girl  :D  Now if my son ever decides to do that, it better be because he's seen more than enough black women and none of them seem to meet his mamma's standards  :D

I don't know what kind of neighborhood my kids will end up in, but I'll try my darndest to find a better way to expose them to blacks other than J&J. But I guess if push comes to shove (i.e., son brings home a white girl)..... ;D

Lol, by then it'll be too late.  ;D 
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: faith2005 on August 02, 2006, 01:22:57 PM
yeah jack and jill is weird. I knew alot of people in jack and jill, but my parents couldn't afford all of that stuff. the kids in it sorta looked down on me. most of them ended up going to hbcu's. my friend who went to prep school in boston had a similar experience. (which plays into my idea that hbcus are schools for elite black people, while the middle class/immigrants scrape their way into other pwis). and now they're really friendly. there is a sort of fakeness about it--like they didn't think i was good enough to commune with them and their ilk until i went to yale. there were some jj kids at yale (not necessarily acting that way though), but I knew more growing up. i don't know if i want my kids to act like that.

on another note I have two articles. first this one is about father's rights. does anybody remember that discussion on the main board? turns out there was a father's roe v. wade...

COUNTERPOINT: Respect a Man's Choice, Too
By Glenn Sacks and Jeffery M. Leving, AlterNet. Posted August 1, 2006.

Editor's Note: In her July 26 AlterNet article, "The Difference Between a Womb and a Wallet," writer Kai Ma agreed with the recent court dismissal of the "Roe v. Wade for men" case, in which Matthew Dubay fought for his self-perceived right not to financially support an unplanned pregnancy. Below, men's rights advocates Glenn Sacks and Jeffery M. Levin offer a very different view of men's financial responsibility toward unwanted offspring.

Kai Ma's recent AlterNet article "The Difference Between a Womb and a Wallet" applauds a U.S. District Court judge's quick, contemptuous dismissal of Matthew Dubay's "Roe v. Wade for Men" lawsuit. Dubay sought to wipe out the child support payments he is obligated to make to an ex-girlfriend who, he says, used a fallacious claim of infertility to deceive him into getting her pregnant.

In opposing "choice for men," Ma asserts that a "woman's decision to terminate a pregnancy is not the equivalent of a man's choice to financially opt out of fatherhood." She cites the pain and discomfort of pregnancy, and the way motherhood "may limit our mobility or careers."

These problems are very real; however, so are the problems created when men are saddled with child support obligations. According to Men's Health magazine, 100,000 men each year are jailed for alleged nonpayment of child support. Federal Office of Child Support Enforcement data reveal that 70 percent of those behind on payments earn poverty level wages. The "Most Wanted Deadbeat Dad" lists put out by most states are used both for police actions and to hunt and shame "deadbeats" through newspaper ads and publicity campaigns. These lists are largely comprised of uneducated African-American and Latino men with occupation descriptions like "laborer," "maintenance man" and "roofer."

Ma dismisses the burden of child support as being "a few hundred dollars a month." However, in California, a noncustodial father of two earning a modest $3,800 a month in net income pays $1,300 a month in child support. The money -- almost $300,000 over 18 years -- is tax-free to the custodial mother. One can reasonably debate whether this sum is appropriate or excessive. One cannot reasonably dismiss it as being insignificant. Ma portrays children as a mother's albatross, forgetting that parenting is also the greatest joy a person can experience in life. Yes, in single mother homes, the mother bears the burden of most of the childrearing, but the mothers also experience the lion's share of the joys and benefits of having children. Noncustodial fathers are not so fortunate -- they're usually permitted only a few days a month to spend with their kids. Once mom finds a new man, they're often pushed out entirely in favor of the child's "new dad."

Ma condemns men who "lie, deceive, break their promises, or pull a 180 … who agree to marry but don't," and laments that "millions of women" have been "trapped into single motherhood for life with, often, next to no recourse." Yet according to a randomized study of 46,000 divorce cases published in the American Law and Economics Review, two-thirds of all divorces involving couples with children are initiated by mothers, not fathers, and in only 6 percent of cases did the women claim to be divorcing cruel or abusive husbands.

The out-of-wedlock birth rate in the United States hovers around 33 percent -- given the wide variety of contraceptive and reproductive choices women enjoy, this can hardly be blamed primarily on men. Yes, in some of these cases the mother and father shared a relationship that the mother (and the father) may have expected would become a marriage. Yet these relationships fail for many reasons besides male perfidy. These include: youth, economic pressure and the lack of living wage jobs (how many couples fight over money?), and the mothers' post-partum depression and mood-swings. It's doubtful that many men really wake up in the morning and say to themselves, "My child loves me and needs me, my girlfriend loves me and needs me -- I'm outta here."

Ma says men "shouldn't be able to choose to abandon that child in the lurch." Yet 1.5 million American women legally walk away from motherhood every year through adoption, abortion or abandonment. In over 40 states mothers can completely opt out of motherhood by returning unwanted babies to the hospital shortly after birth. If men like Dubay are deadbeats and deserters, what are these women?

Whenever a child is born outside of the context of a loving, two-parent family, there are no good solutions. Ma overstates her case, but she is correct that "Choice for Men" is a flawed solution. However, the current regime, which provides women with a variety of choices and men with none, is also flawed.

Matthew Dubay's conduct is not particularly admirable, and he's certainly not a candidate for father of the year; however, he does have a point. Over the past four decades, women's advocates have successfully made the case that it is wrong to force a pregnancy on an unwilling mother. Despite the backlash against Dubay, hopefully his lawsuit will result in a greater societal awareness that it is also wrong to force a pregnancy on an unwilling father.

Glenn Sacks is a men's and fathers' issues columnist, commentator, and radio talk show host. Jeffery M. Leving is a family law attorney and author of "Fathers' Rights: Hard-hitting and Fair Advice for Every Father Involved in a Custody Dispute."
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: 2Lacoste on August 02, 2006, 01:23:19 PM
Bush Grants Self Permission To Grant More Power To Self
August 1, 2006 | Issue 42•31

WASHINGTON, DC—In a decisive 1–0 decision Monday, President Bush voted to grant the president the constitutional power to grant himself additional powers.


President Bush announces announcement of the new power-granting announcement.
"As president, I strongly believe that my  first duty as president is to support and serve the president," Bush said during a televised address from the East Room of the White House shortly after signing his executive order. "I promise the American people that I will not abuse this new power, unless it becomes necessary to grant myself the power to do so at a later time."

The Presidential Empowerment Act, which the president hand-drafted on his own Oval Office stationery and promptly signed into law, provides Bush with full authority to permit himself to authorize increased jurisdiction over the three branches of the federal government, provided that the president considers it in his best interest to do so.

"In a time of war, the president must  have the power he needs to make the tough decisions, including, if need be, the decision to grant himself even more power," Bush said. "To do otherwise would be playing into the hands of our enemies."

Added Bush: "And it's all under due process of the law as I see it."

"The president can grant himself the  power to interpret new laws however he sees fit, then use that power to interpret a law in such a manner that in turn grants him increased power," noted Attorney General Alberto Gonzalez

In addition, the president reserves the right to overturn any decision to allow himself to increase his power by using a line-item veto, which in turn may only be overruled by the president.

Senior administration officials lauded Bush's decision, saying that current presidential powers over presidential power were "far too limited."

"Previously, the president only had the power to petition Congress to allow him to grant himself the power to grant more power to himself," Attorney General Alberto Gonzalez said shortly after the ceremony. "Now, the president can grant himself the  power to interpret new laws however he sees fit, then use that power to interpret a law in such a manner that in turn grants him increased power."

 In addition, a proviso in the 12th provision of the new law permits Bush the authority to waive the need for any presidential authorization of power in a case concerning national security, although legal experts suggest it would be little exercised.

Despite the president's new powers, the role of Congress and the Supreme Court has not been overlooked. Under the new law, both enjoy the newly broadened ability to grant the president the authority to increase his presidential powers.

"The only thing we can do now is withhold our ability to grant him more authority to grant himself more power—unless he authorizes himself to strip us of that power," said Sen. Harry Reid (D–NV).

"This gives the president the tools he needs to ensure that the president has all the necessary tools to expedite what needs to be done, unfettered by presidential restrictions on himself," said Rep. John Cornyn (R-TX). "It's long overdue."

Though public response to the new law has been limited, there has been an unfavorable reaction among Democrats, who are calling for restrictions on Bush's power to allow himself to grant the president more powers that would restrict the powers of Congress.

"This is a clear case of President Bush having carte blanche to grant himself complete discretion to enact laws to increase his power," Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) said. "The only thing we can do now is withhold our ability to grant him more authority to grant himself more power."

"Unless he authorizes himself to strip us of that power," Reid added.

Despite criticism, Bush took his first official action under the new law Tuesday, signing an executive order ordering that the chief executive be able to order more executive orders.

In addition, Republicans fearful that the president's new power undermines their ability to grant him power have proposed a new law that would allow senators to permit him to grant himself power, with or without presidential approval.

Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: faith2005 on August 02, 2006, 01:27:11 PM
this makes sense. apartment hunting was such a sad experience for me. i felt like people would hear my voice and immediately count me out. one guy said he needed my social to do a background check. another woman said that she wanted me as her tenant, she just "ran out" of credit check forms, then emailed me the next to say she'd rented it to someone else. i offered her the money on the spot too. i feel like racial and voice profiling had to play a role...

Testers Posing as Katrina Survivors Encounter ‘Linguistic Profiling’
by Lorinda Bullock
NNPA National Correspondent
Originally posted 8/1/2006

WASHINGTON (NNPA) – As the one-year anniversary of Hurricane Katrina approaches August 29, displaced Americans from Louisiana and the Gulf Coast have been slowly rebuilding their lives and looking for a place to call home.

While Katrina’s Black victims shop the housing market, calling realtors and potential landlords, one thing may be standing between them and their new homes even before an appointment is made or paperwork filled out—their voice.

It’s called linguistic profiling.

A study of five states done by the National Fair Housing Alliance and linguistics expert John Baugh revealed in 66 percent of phone tests administered by White and Black testers inquiring about housing as Katrina survivors, “White callers were favored over African-American callers,” the report said.

“Yes, people do use the telephone as a screening device in many, many businesses,” Baugh said.

Shanna Smith, president and CEO of the Washington-based NFHA, said the organization’s report on “Housing Discrimination Against Hurricane Katrina Survivors” showed repeated bias in a number of areas, including Black testers not getting return phone calls, and being quoted higher rent prices and security deposits.

“In Birmingham, a White tester was told that a $150 security deposit and $25 per adult application fee would be waived for her as a Hurricane Katrina victim. She was also told she needed to make 2.5 times the rent to qualify for the apartment. The African-American tester was told that she would have to pay $150 for the security deposit and a $25 application fee for each applicant.
The African-American hurricane survivor was also told that she would have to make three times the rent to qualify for the apartment,” the report stated.

The testing took place in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Tennessee and Texas, and showed instances of White testers being offered free televisions and partially refunded security deposits.

But those offers were not extended to Black testers, who were often saddled with additional administrative fees that were non-refundable.

“It’s a different kind of behavior in discrimination from the 70s until now where they would just simply say we don’t have anything available. Now they try not to trigger suspicion so they may say when do you need it or I won’t know until the end of the month, when in fact, they may have three or four apartments available right now. But if you’re the caller that sounds reasonable,” Smith said.

Smith, whose organization has worked with Baugh since the early 1990s, said another tactic that is used is asking a potential renter or buyer for their name to be put on a waiting list and “Names that didn’t sound middle America White, they didn’t get the return emails about availability.”

The current trend happening with the Katrina victims is no surprise to either Smith or Baugh.

Baugh has logged thousands of calls, since 1987, using testers of different races and backgrounds, including himself.

Baugh, an African-American man, started studying the practice of linguistic profiling after his own personal experience when he was looking for an apartment in the San Francisco Bay Area.

“I was calling various landlords to go look at apartments and in about two or three cases, I got there and they told me there had been some mistake and the apartments had already been rented. And it just didn’t seem right to me and I speculated that they didn’t realize I was African-American when they made the appointment with me. But once they saw me in person they came up with some excuse. They didn’t say, ‘No, we don’t rent to Black people’ but they came up with some ‘unquote’ legitimate excuse,” Baugh said.

He found the questions from the landlords varied, depending on the voice they heard, but Baugh, who flawlessly uses three different voices—a “Latino rendition, modified African-American rendition and standard English”—always kept the opening line the same, “Hello, I’m calling about the apartment you have advertised in the paper,” he would say.

“It’s exactly the same phrase. The only thing I’ve done there is modify the intonation. So it isn’t like I used the word ain’t or be or anything. Even if you use a certain kind of intonation, it is possible that somebody might discriminate against you just based on the sound of your voice over the telephone,” Baugh said.

Baugh who just finished a five-year study with the Ford Foundation looking at the issue in the United States, has started a new two-year project with the Ford Foundation. This time, he’s examining linguistic profiling globally, for people of African descent in places like South Africa, Brazil and France. He is currently the Margaret Bush Wilson Professor in Arts and Sciences at Washington University.

Baugh has also used his expertise in civil and criminal court cases. Many of the civil cases dealing with linguistic profiling have settled out of court. As for the criminal cases, he is developing ear-witness testimony in hopes of having a similar impact of DNA testing used to exonerate the innocent and solidify proof against the guilty.

While Baugh says Black and Hispanic people in the U.S. are discriminated against heavily because of their voice, he also makes it very clear that linguistic profiling is not even limited to just those groups.

“They (southern Whites) think they need to show up in person so the people there don’t think they’re Black. Even within any racial group, there is enough linguistic diversity you get different prejudicial issues coming up,” he said.

But even Whites seeking diversity find that realtors and landlords are drawing the lines deciding where clients should live despite their wishes, said Smith, who is White.

“As White people we get those direct comments made to us. I’ve been doing testing where people say, you’re going to like it here. We don’t rent to Blacks. I’ve been told when I’ve asked for housing in interracial neighborhoods, real estate agents will say, ‘well who will your kids date?’ It’s not going to be safe for you. It’s going to be better for you to move here. White people hear this all the time. The problem is they don’t know they can do something about it.”

Smith said the Fair Housing Act strictly states that truthful information must be given to everyone who calls.

If people feel they are getting different treatment, Smith suggested they can call one of the 100 fair housing centers in the country or the national office in Washington. The fair housing centers can have a White tester call in as little as 30 minutes and will compare the results. Both Smith and Baugh suggest keeping detailed notes of the experience.

“We estimate there are close to 4 million instances of discrimination that occurs annually in the U.S. My members only report about 18,000 a year. HUD only gets around 3,000 complaints a year,” she said.

But the reported numbers are so low because there are only 100 centers and states like California, Ohio and Michigan have multiple centers leaving other states without centers at all.

“So you have thousands of cities that don’t have a private fair housing center,” she said.

While everyone “accommodates linguistically” depending on the situation, be it a job interview or joking with friends, Baugh said people should not have to hide who they are but shouldn’t be naive to society’s biases either.

“People should not feel they need to mask their linguistic background,” he said. “The United States should be the most linguistically tolerant nation on the face of the earth because our citizens come from everywhere. And because of the fact that all of our ancestors had to go through a transition where English was not their mother tongue… You should be free to speak in whatever way is comfortable for you and your fellow citizens don’t misjudge you.”
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on August 02, 2006, 01:36:29 PM
Interesting article.  "Linguistic profiling."  Faith, I didn't think you sounded particularly "black."
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: faith2005 on August 02, 2006, 01:41:09 PM
well, i think i do. but even if not, there is still my name.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on August 02, 2006, 01:42:20 PM
Ah, that's true.  The name thing.  Lol, that's why I don't give out my middle name.  I like to be ambiguous.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Inquirer on August 02, 2006, 01:45:34 PM
hbcus are schools for elite black people, while the middle class/immigrants scrape their way into other pwis.
[pwis] ]

This comment cracked me up :D

Re: the profiling...

Have any of you ever noticed yourself making sure you don't sound "too black" while you're on a business call??
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on August 02, 2006, 01:56:38 PM
No, but I do feel sorry for those blacks, usually with a low educational level, who attempt to mask their accent, but only end up sounding worse.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: faith2005 on August 02, 2006, 02:01:11 PM
ok inquirer--maybe i should say the so-called "elite" hbcus--like hampton, howard, spel-house, nc a&t etc. maybe its not true at tougaloo. but seriously people seem to bear this theory out for me time and time again. i'm the first person in my family to pursue a graduate degree, and that wasn't true of the people i've met from hbcus generally. there are always some outliers though.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: 2Lacoste on August 02, 2006, 02:52:28 PM
Talking to this guy tonight at an event.  Should be interesting:

Harry Truman would have given terrorists hell
Democrats know how to fight real wars, not just political ones, says Peter Beinart.
By Peter Beinart, PETER BEINART is editor-at-large of the New Republic and author of "The Good Fight: Why Liberals -- and Only Liberals -- Can Win the War on Terror and Make America Great Again."

 June 4, 2006


IN 1948, AMERICAN liberals went to war — with each other. The chief combatants were Henry A. Wallace, Franklin D. Roosevelt's former vice president and the most popular politician on the American left, and Harry S. Truman, Roosevelt's successor and a man widely derided as a party hack.

The issue was anti-communism and whether liberals should see it as a betrayal of their principles or as their natural culmination. For Wallace, liberals had one enemy: the reactionary right. For Truman, they had two: conservatives, to be sure, but also totalitarianism, in its communist as well as fascist guises. Liberalism, as Truman supporter Arthur Schlesinger famously put it, represented the "vital center" — defending social progress and individual freedom against tyrannies of both the right and left.

 In one form or another, liberals have been replaying the Truman-Wallace argument ever since. Truman's anti-totalitarian liberalism carried the day in 1948 and reigned until Vietnam, when many liberals grew disgusted with the Cold War and nominated George McGovern, an old Wallace supporter, for president.

Even after the Soviet Union crumbled, Vietnam's legacy prevented most liberals from endorsing military action against the brutal Iraqi dictator, Saddam Hussein, in 1991. But as the 1990s rolled on, Bill Clinton slowly learned some of Truman's lessons — culminating in the 1999 bombing campaign against Kosovo, a multilateral war to prevent the neo-fascist Slobodan Milosevic from cleansing ethnic Albanians from their homes.

Informed by Clinton's legacy, and by patriotic fury at Al Qaeda's terrorist attacks on the United States, Truman liberalism seemed ascendant in the wake of 9/11. Polling in the months after the attack showed Democrats just as likely as Republicans to see the war on terror as a just and urgent cause. Had Al Gore been president, he would almost certainly have overthrown the Taliban. And facing a jihadist movement that, like Nazism and communism, seeks to stamp out all independent civil society in pursuit of a purified, utopian state, anti-totalitarianism would have likely come to define American liberalism again.

Tragically, things have not worked out that way. Instead, George W. Bush was elected, and he has wielded the war on terror as a political cudgel, spurning bipartisan compromises on issues such as the Department of Homeland Security and domestic surveillance even when they were easily achievable. His disastrous war in Iraq (which some liberal hawks, like myself, mistakenly backed) has left liberals enraged.

As a result, the war on terror has become just what Karl Rove hoped it would be: a wedge issue. In early 2005, when the Center for American Progress and the Century Foundation asked self-described liberals and conservatives to cite their top two foreign policy goals, conservatives rated destroying Al Qaeda as No. 1. Among liberals, by contrast, it tied for No. 10. Last November, an MIT survey found that only 59% of Democrats, as opposed to 94% of Republicans, still endorsed the Afghan war. And only 57% of Democrats said they would use military force "to destroy a terrorist camp." Courtesy of President Bush, Wallace liberalism is back.

Politically, the problems this creates are obvious because Democrats have long been branded as weak on national security, and Republicans will keep making that an issue in elections to come. But the danger is far deeper. Defeating jihadism will require relearning liberal anti-totalitarianism's lessons. What Truman understood — and Bush does not — is that for the United States to change the world, it must also change itself. For Cold War liberals, the struggle against communism and the struggle for civil rights were intertwined — because only by overcoming injustice at home could the U.S. inspire others to do so abroad. Moral progress, then as now, requires moral reciprocity. For the U.S. to promote freedom in the Islamic world, Americans and Middle Easterners must come together to define a common vision of democracy and human rights, one that challenges American actions at Guantanamo Bay as much as it challenges the autocratic regimes of the Arab world.

The vehicles for such reciprocity are international institutions and international law, something liberals — unlike neoconservatives — have long supported. From NATO and the United Nations to the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund, the heyday of Cold War liberalism — the late 1940s — was an extraordinary period of institution building. Those institutions forged the democratic alliance that outlasted Soviet communism.

Today, they have atrophied. And they must be rebuilt to accomplish the myriad tasks — from monitoring loose nuclear materials, to promoting democracy, to intervening in failed states — that winning the war on terror will require.

In the nation's new anti-totalitarianism fight, the liberal tradition, properly understood, furnishes the intellectual and moral resources necessary for victory. If a new generation of liberals can look beyond their hatred of Bush, it is theirs to claim.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: One Step Ahead on August 02, 2006, 02:54:41 PM
is anyone else slightly concered that jamaica considers "regular" black people to be those who are homeless/frequent soup kitchens et al?

Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on August 02, 2006, 03:12:39 PM
is anyone else slightly concered that jamaica considers "regular" black people to be those who are homeless/frequent soup kitchens et al?

Lol, I hadn't thought about that, but that is sorta what she's implying.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: crazy8 on August 02, 2006, 03:22:09 PM
Woah OSA slow your roll, ask me what I mean without putting words in my mouth! >:(
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: One Step Ahead on August 02, 2006, 03:25:55 PM
I didn't put words in your mouth--I found your statement to be a bit saddening

edit: that is to say it is saddening to think that there is such a divide in our community that either you are jack or jill or struggling i.e. regular
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: crazy8 on August 02, 2006, 03:32:00 PM
I've made many statements...which one are you referring to?

FTR I don't believe that "regular" black folks are homeless/frequent soup kitchens.  I do believe that "regular" black folks will not be found in J&J's.  Kids of privliege need to be aware that they are privliged and most people (esp. black people) don't live like they do.  That does not mean that most are homeless or frequent soup kitchens if that's how it read.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: One Step Ahead on August 02, 2006, 03:38:09 PM
this is the one I was referring to:

In high school, my mom "forced" me to tutor at an after-school program for high-risk kids.  I fed the homeless every Thanksgiving, and handed out gifts to those in need (some of these people attended my school).  I consider those regular black people.


perhaps because I didn't grow up jack and jill or anywhere close to it but also didn't grow up homeless that statement just made me think about how stratified our community is.  My question was meant to be philosophical and not accusatory--what is "regular" in our community, how do we define it, and what do we want it to be? 
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: crazy8 on August 02, 2006, 03:52:01 PM
I'm not sure if we can really define "regular" or whether there even needs to be a regular within our community.  I think it's important for us and our kids to know that our community ranges economically, and most of them are not "well-off".
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: One Step Ahead on August 02, 2006, 04:18:36 PM
but then couldn't you say that about American society generally?

edit:  I agree with what you've said above btw
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: crazy8 on August 02, 2006, 04:42:54 PM
I was going to say that, but since we were talking about J&J I just left it at that.  Even in the middle class, a white middle class male will have a different experience in life than a black middle class male.  Instead, I beleive J&J perpetuates the belief that they have the same privlieges in life than their white peers.  But money can only go so far, and rubbing shoulders with the upper echeleon of the black society doesn't give a child that understanding imo and makes them out of touch with the majority of the black community.  Does that make sense?  I typed something better but got booted  >:(
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on August 02, 2006, 04:55:44 PM
Instead, I beleive J&J perpetuates the belief that they have the same privlieges in life than their white peers. 

Hm, from the article and from what I know of J&J, I don't think that's true.  In fact, I think that's part of what they're trying to combat...hence the quote from the parents whose daughter doesn't think that racism exists.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: One Step Ahead on August 02, 2006, 04:57:10 PM
I was going to say that, but since we were talking about J&J I just left it at that.  Even in the middle class, a white middle class male will have a different experience in life than a black middle class male.  Instead, I beleive J&J perpetuates the belief that they have the same privlieges in life than their white peers.  But money can only go so far, and rubbing shoulders with the upper echeleon of the black society doesn't give a child that understanding imo and makes them out of touch with the majority of the black community.  Does that make sense?  I typed something better but got booted  >:(

I hate when that happens!  you can never remember everything you wanted to say.

anyway I think we agree-- J&J sounds mad suspect.  No offense to those of you who were in it, but I want my child to have a more balanced view of life.  But then again, as a product of public schools I'm a big believer in the types of interactions they foster.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on August 02, 2006, 04:59:47 PM
Do you still have to be invited to join?
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: One Step Ahead on August 02, 2006, 05:01:48 PM
Do you still have to be invited to join?

probably.  I doubt anyone will send me an application  :D
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: crazy8 on August 02, 2006, 05:02:40 PM
I agree OSA.  Alci, from what I know (based on those I know who have done it) about J&J and those other social groups, it's just a way for these blacks to believe they're in touch with the black community when they're only in touch with the blacks they rub shoulders with.  It is also a way to keep their kids mingling with the "right" black people.  I'm sure that mom would have the same concern if her son brought home a "'round da way" girl, and would still be running to put her child in J&J.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: One Step Ahead on August 02, 2006, 05:06:29 PM
could we start a new group or are such groups doomed to be mired in petty politics/elitism?
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on August 02, 2006, 05:07:10 PM
I'm sure that mom would have the same concern if her son brought home a "'round da way" the way girl, and would still be running to put her child in J&J.

Lol, of course.  But lots of well-to-do parents do that.  In some respects, it's just looking out for their best interest.  I wouldn't want my daughter to date a thug.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on August 02, 2006, 05:08:15 PM
could we start a new group or are such groups doomed to be mired in petty politics/elitism?

If your group is to "help" rich black kids, it's going to be viewed as elitist.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: One Step Ahead on August 02, 2006, 05:10:02 PM
what if my group is geared to talented black kids?  can we differentiate at all? 
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on August 02, 2006, 05:10:54 PM
I think the problem is a disconnect between rich and "regular" black kids.  Rich does not always equal talented.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: One Step Ahead on August 02, 2006, 05:12:31 PM
I think the problem is a disconnect between rich and "regular" black kids.  Rich does not always equal talented.

rich rarely equals talented. 
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Inquirer on August 02, 2006, 05:13:30 PM
Do you still have to be invited to join?

Jack& Jill? Yes.
http://www.jack-and-jill.org/
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: One Step Ahead on August 02, 2006, 05:14:29 PM
I'm sure that mom would have the same concern if her son brought home a "'round da way" the way girl, and would still be running to put her child in J&J.

Lol, of course.  But lots of well-to-do parents do that.  In some respects, it's just looking out for their best interest.  I wouldn't want my daughter to date a thug.

why not?  he could bring da pain
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on August 02, 2006, 05:17:45 PM
I think the problem is a disconnect between rich and "regular" black kids.  Rich does not always equal talented.

rich rarely equals talented. 

OK.  The point is, it wouldn't solve the problem.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on August 02, 2006, 05:18:14 PM
I'm sure that mom would have the same concern if her son brought home a "'round da way" the way girl, and would still be running to put her child in J&J.

Lol, of course.  But lots of well-to-do parents do that.  In some respects, it's just looking out for their best interest.  I wouldn't want my daughter to date a thug.

why not?  he could bring da pain

Lol, please.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on August 02, 2006, 05:18:54 PM
Do you still have to be invited to join?

Jack& Jill? Yes.
http://www.jack-and-jill.org/

That's what I thought.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: One Step Ahead on August 02, 2006, 05:20:03 PM
I think the problem is a disconnect between rich and "regular" black kids.  Rich does not always equal talented.

rich rarely equals talented. 

OK.  The point is, it wouldn't solve the problem.

why wouldn't it solve the problem if I had a group that assembled bright kids across the socieconomic spectrum?
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on August 02, 2006, 05:23:08 PM
I think the problem is a disconnect between rich and "regular" black kids.  Rich does not always equal talented.

rich rarely equals talented. 

OK.  The point is, it wouldn't solve the problem.

why wouldn't it solve the problem if I had a group that assembled bright kids across the socieconomic spectrum?

If your group were taken to a national scale, it would serve only a fraction of the rich and "regular" kids.  I think the "talented" ones are less likely to need help than the boneheads.  They're the ones who go around acting elitist, because money is the only thing they have.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: crazy8 on August 02, 2006, 05:23:54 PM
I think the problem is a disconnect between rich and "regular" black kids.  Rich does not always equal talented.

rich rarely equals talented. 

Rich oftentimes = opportunity imo
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: One Step Ahead on August 02, 2006, 05:28:58 PM
I think the problem is a disconnect between rich and "regular" black kids.  Rich does not always equal talented.

rich rarely equals talented. 

OK.  The point is, it wouldn't solve the problem.

why wouldn't it solve the problem if I had a group that assembled bright kids across the socieconomic spectrum?

If your group were taken to a national scale, it would serve only a fraction of the rich and "regular" kids.  I think the "talented" ones are less likely to need help than the boneheads.  They're the ones who go around acting elitist, because money is the only thing they have.

I don't want to take my program to the national scale--thats when it becomes corrupted.  I'm saying wherever I end up--lets pretend thats the DC metro area-- I start a group. 

talented kids need a lot more help than rich kids--they are the ones most likely to slip through the cracks.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on August 02, 2006, 05:35:56 PM
How so?
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: crazy8 on August 02, 2006, 05:38:28 PM
They get caught up in the wrong things and go the wrong way....there are definitely some potential doctors and lawyers sitting in prison now.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: One Step Ahead on August 02, 2006, 05:40:32 PM
How so?
examples of talented kids gone amuck--
the kid who is bored in class because s/he already know the material so starts causing trouble.
the kid whose report card looks something like this A+ C C C B D cause they are really interested in one class, but couldn't give two rats tails about the rest.
the kid who has near perfect exam results, but never turns in homework so ends up with a B/B+
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on August 02, 2006, 05:57:24 PM
I don't see how this relates to the goal of exposing rich kids to "regular" kids.  We now seem to be focusing on keeping smart kids occupied.  Two different goals.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: crazy8 on August 02, 2006, 06:02:46 PM
maybe it's just wishful thinking, but being a child of ps education, I honestly believe that you can allow your kids to "mingle" with "regular" kids, allow them to attend public schools and they will be fine.  As long as you make sure they are disciplined and do their work (basically provide them with good parenting) they'll be fine. 

I for one don't plan on buying my kids unnecessary ish so they can go to school showing off what their parents bought for them.  They will earn everything they get beyond the basics and they'll be fine.  Like my mother always reminded me, "you don't own anything, I own everything" :D
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: One Step Ahead on August 02, 2006, 06:03:47 PM
I don't care about rich kids; My kids will not be rich.

edit: ditto jamaica.  in the words of Cosby to Theo--"you aren't rich; your mom and I are rich.  you have nothing"
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: crazy8 on August 02, 2006, 06:08:29 PM
ha ha, my mom pro'ly stole it from Cosby. :D
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Special Agent Dana Scully on August 02, 2006, 06:10:42 PM
I don't care about rich kids; My kids will not be rich.

edit: ditto jamaica.  in the words of Cosby to Theo--"you aren't rich; your mom and me are rich.  you have nothing"

I thought that they said it to Vanessa (ep where she tells ppl about the 11g painting)...I'm a Cosby Show freak,so sue me  ;) :D
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: One Step Ahead on August 02, 2006, 06:18:17 PM
I don't care about rich kids; My kids will not be rich.

edit: ditto jamaica.  in the words of Cosby to Theo--"you aren't rich; your mom and me are rich.  you have nothing"

I thought that they said it to Vanessa (ep where she tells ppl about the 11g painting)...I'm a Cosby Show freak,so sue me  ;) :D

oh damn, you might have me, but I feel like he also said it to Theo.  where is rbg?!
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on August 02, 2006, 06:35:07 PM
I don't care about rich kids; My kids will not be rich.

OK, then this has moved beyond J&J.  Most of those kids are well off.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: One Step Ahead on August 02, 2006, 06:37:49 PM
I don't care about rich kids; My kids will not be rich.

OK, then this has moved beyond J&J.  Most of those kids are well off.

I think you are the only person who cared two farthings for Jack + Jill--I was talking about what I was going to do with my kids and you kept bringing J&J up
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on August 02, 2006, 06:56:41 PM
Lol. Listen.  You started talking about forming a "new group."  I thought this new group was to expose well-off black kids to "regular" blacks, since that's what we'd been talking about for the past 3 pages.  Just because someone doesn't know how to transition topics... :P
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: One Step Ahead on August 02, 2006, 09:18:16 PM
I kept telling you I don't care about rich kids.   >:( keep up  :D
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: faith2005 on August 03, 2006, 01:04:45 PM
craziness in San Jose...

New hate crime alleged
By Sean Webby and Leslie Griffy
Mercury News
Previously: Santa Clara Sikh stabbed in apparent hate crime
ATTACK ON BLACK MAN FOLLOWS SIKH STABBING

Shouting ``White Power'' and firing off Nazi salutes, two men attacked an African-American man in downtown Mountain View over the weekend, authorities reported Tuesday. It was the second alleged hate crime to come to light in Santa Clara County in two days.

Joseph Adam Krueger, 21, and Jonathan Rhodes, 18, both from the Central Valley city of Ceres, face up to nine years in state prison if convicted on assault and hate crime charges.

They are being held in Santa Clara County Jail, San Jose, in lieu of $20,000 bail each and are expected to be arraigned today in the Palo Alto branch of Santa Clara County Superior Court.

Rick Callender, president of the San Jose/Silicon Valley branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, said he was appalled by the allegations and outraged at what he felt was a low bail.

``They need a six-figure minimum,'' Callender said. ``These are the kind of people who will strike fear in the hearts of African-Americans as they walk down the street. They will have people asking themselves ``Do I bring my family down there?' ''

Also expected to be arraigned today, in San Jose, is 20-year-old Everett Thompson, who allegedly stabbed his neighbor with a steak knife in Santa Clara on Sunday because he wrongly believed the Sikh grandfather belonged to the Taliban.

The Mountain View incident occurred before the one in Santa Clara. About 10 p.m. Saturday in Pioneer Park, Krueger and Rhodes -- who had been working on a nearby construction site -- assaulted another man, apparently over an argument about talking disrespectfully to a woman. That man ran away. But the 19-year-old Mountain View victim -- who was not identified -- confronted the pair.

``Who's talking . . .? This is White Power!'' one of the suspects allegedly shouted.

Then, as they called him racial epithets and threatened his life, they attacked, authorities said. Krueger allegedly held on to the victim's hair and punched him, holding a knife, as the victim begged them to stop. The two punctuated the attack by yelling white supremacist slogans and Nazi salutes, officials said.

Police arrived during the attack and arrested the suspects.

The victim suffered minor injuries and was not hospitalized.

Meanwhile, the victim in the Santa Clara stabbing, Iqbal Singh, remains in the hospital; a gash on his neck is slowly healing.

Reports of the crime shocked the suspect's close-knit family. Thompson's cousin Gary Lopez described a large multicultural family, that includes a Sikh great-uncle in Los Angeles.

``This is not something a sane person would do,'' Lopez said. ``This isn't something that the Everett I know would do.''

But Thompson began to change two years ago, Lopez said. He was arrested for crouching on his hands and knees in the middle of a South Bay street and barking like a dog, Lopez said. The family intervened and Thompson began taking medication.

Lopez could not explain Thompson's alleged attack on Singh.

Jay Boyarsky, who is overseeing the prosecution of both cases for the Santa Clara County District Attorney's Office, said no matter what their motivation, the suspects' alleged behavior was unacceptable.

``Although these cases present very different facts, they remind all for us that we are vulnerable to hate,'' Boyarsky said. ``And both cases present a challenge for us to work toward a more just community free from racism, bias and prejudice.''

There has been a troubling convergence of hate crimes recently, along with the widely reported anti-Semitic tirade by Hollywood star Mel Gibson.

Experts said the recent spate of hate crimes are disparate, unconnected incidents. But none should be excused or rationalized because their perpetrators may be mentally ill, drunk or from a far away place, according to Jonathan Bernstein, the area's director of the Anti-Defamation League.

``All of these are ways for us to feel more comfortable about our situation,'' Bernstein said. `` `I don't need to get so deeply involved with this, it's an aberration,' they might say. When in fact we all do get involved in this fight.''
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on August 03, 2006, 01:35:50 PM
Looks like you should have gone to San Jose, OSA...
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: One Step Ahead on August 03, 2006, 09:38:26 PM
the Bay Area is definitely where its at.  Crash ain't got nothing on the ish that goes down on the East Bay
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: crazy8 on August 04, 2006, 06:42:46 AM
I always hoped to be a part of the first legal team to represent a small country against the U.S. in a WTO case.  Oh well, I'm sure there'll be more to come....


Against All Odds
Antigua Besting U.S. in Internet Gambling Case at WTO

By Paul Blustein
Washington Post Staff Writer
Friday, August 4, 2006; D01



Locked in a federal prison in the Nevada desert, tortured by the distant lights of the Las Vegas strip, Jay Cohen couldn't stop thinking about getting even with the government that had put him away -- and his revenge fantasy had a unique twist.

U.S. prosecutors put Cohen behind bars in 2002 for running an Internet gambling site in the Caribbean country of Antigua and Barbuda. Not long before the prison gates clanged shut, he had learned that the federal crackdown on online betting might violate global trade rules.

So he got Antigua and Barbuda to instigate a complaint at the World Trade Organization. "It kind of helped keep my spirits up," he said.

Fast forward: Antigua and Barbuda, population 69,000, is winning. The case has become an embarrassment to Washington, one that could result in economic pain. It isn't quite over, but the world's only superpower may have to capitulate to a country whose entire population could easily fit into the Rose Bowl.

Never has such a tiny nation brought a WTO complaint against the United States, which is one reason the dispute has implications well beyond the issue of gambling.

A frequent irritant in international relations is that small, weak countries such as Antigua feel run over by big, rich countries such as the United States. That's especially true in global trade. For instance, developing countries say their destitute farmers get the short end of the stick because of the subsidies and protections that rich governments give their farmers. Just last week, negotiations to redress such grievances collapsed.

The WTO, the body that referees global commerce from its offices in Geneva, claims to play equalizer: Its Web site notes that small countries have beaten bigger ones in its trade courts. A win for Antigua would improve the WTO's image of requiring all nations, Davids and Goliaths alike, to follow the rules.

At the same time, global institutions such as the WTO sometimes seem to infringe on national sovereignty, forcing countries to defy the will of their own people. An Antiguan victory could inflame such feelings in Congress. Sentiment against online gambling remains strong there; the House recently voted to bolster the U.S. ban on it.

Far as it may be from the central debates of world trade, the curious tale of Internet gambling in Antigua reveals a lot about the perceptions of fairness that fuel those debates.

Setting global precedents wasn't what Cohen, now 38, had in mind a decade ago when he quit his job as a floor trader at the Pacific Stock Exchange and moved to Antigua with a couple of friends.

Gambling was legal in Antigua, so Cohen and his buddies figured they would have no problem operating a business that took sports bets from people in the United States. Between golf rounds and fishing trips, they built World Sports Exchange Ltd., one of several dozen Internet betting parlors then springing up in Antigua and elsewhere.

They booked millions of dollars in wagers, mostly on football games and other sporting events in the United States. The industry boomed, becoming Antigua's second-largest employer, after tourism. "Life was fine," Cohen recalled.

Back in the States, though, many leaders grew alarmed, citing a risk that computer betting would lure teenagers and fuel gambling addiction. A crackdown ensued. "You can't go offshore and hide. You can't go online and hide," said Janet Reno, the attorney general at the time.

In 1998, federal prosecutors charged several operators, including Cohen, with violating a 1960s-era law forbidding the use of phone wires for gambling. Convinced that the law didn't apply in Antigua, Cohen returned voluntarily to U.S. soil.

"No judge is going to let this stand," he recalled thinking. But a jury convicted him, the judge gave him 21 months, and the Supreme Court refused to hear the appeal.

Out of the blue, not long before Cohen entered prison in Nevada, a strange letter arrived. He has since lost it. The writer suggested that the U.S. government's position left it vulnerable to a trade complaint.

"Is there anything to this?" he asked a lawyer friend.

Turned out there might be: Several years earlier, Washington had pledged in a trade treaty to open the U.S. market in "recreational, cultural and sporting services" to global competition.

Cohen alerted the Antiguans. They hesitated to file a case, citing one of the biggest inequities in the WTO system: a dearth of funds and legal expertise that often shuts out small countries. Antigua's budget is $145 million a year, and a trade case promised to cost at least $1 million.

The gambling industry finally agreed to foot the bill. Antigua filed. "Did we not have a duty to our citizens to protect their jobs?" said Sir Ronald Sanders, who was then Antigua's ambassador to Britain and the WTO.

The United States had a seemingly strong defense -- the need to protect "public morals and public order." WTO member countries can ban goods and services that might harm their social fabric, a classic case being the prohibition of liquor imports in Muslim countries.

"Gambling in general, and remote supply of gambling in particular, raises grave law-enforcement and consumer-protection concerns," the U.S. trade representative's office said in a legal filing. Attorneys for the trade representative declined to make additional public comments.

There was, however, a hole in the U.S. position: The government tolerates Internet betting on horse races and, in some states, lotteries and other games. Numerous U.S. sites, including Youbet.com and Xpressbet.com, let users wager on races from the New Jersey Meadowlands to the Louisiana Downs.

This was blatant hypocrisy, the Antiguans claimed, contending that the U.S. position violated a trade principle called "national treatment." The principle essentially requires a government to treat foreign goods and services the same as domestic ones. To outlaw liquor imports, a Muslim country must ban domestic brewing, too.

Likewise, the Antiguans contended, the United States can bar citizens from using overseas gambling sites only if it bans domestic sites. Yet Congress has refused to enact a comprehensive ban -- in part because horse racing depends on phone and Internet wagers.

Gambling "preys on lower income classes," said Gary C. Hufbauer, a trade specialist at the Institute for International Economics, who opposes it. "But here we've had all this tolerance toward gambling -- Indian gambling, for example, in my native state of New Mexico. So if the U.S. is going to tolerate this amount of vice, while ruling out a foreign supplier of vice, it does seem to be . . . inconsistent" with trade rules.

WTO judges bought that argument. Antigua won a slam-dunk ruling in 2004, and though an appeals panel scaled it back, Washington was still in a tough spot. The final ruling essentially said that the United States must outlaw all forms of online gambling, including on horse racing, or Antigua wins.

The U.S. government has refused to concede defeat.

The Bush administration first vowed to secure legislation "clarifying" that all forms of online betting are illegal. But the horse racing industry has blocked such efforts on Capitol Hill.

Next, the administration cited testimony by the Justice Department in April claiming that all Internet wagering across state lines, including that on horses, violates existing laws. That was news to the horse racing industry, and it seems to have had little effect. Even so, the administration has pointed to the statement as evidence that the United States treats all online gambling the same.

Scoffing, the Antiguans are asking the WTO to declare that Washington is defying its ruling. Many experts expect Antigua to win again, after months of delay.

Then comes the hard part for Antigua.

The WTO cannot force a country to do anything. Even if found guilty, a country can refuse to change its trade practices. The WTO largely enforces its rulings by giving the victorious country the right to impose punitive duties on the loser's products.

That enforcement mechanism works for big, rich countries such as the United States because other nations fear losing the vast U.S. market. But Antigua's economy is so tiny that few U.S. companies would notice.

"The WTO gives the little guys clout, but it cannot guarantee symmetry of justice," said Claude Barfield, a trade expert at the American Enterprise Institute.

So the Antiguans plan to ask the WTO for the right to impose sanctions that would hurt -- namely, permission to copy and export U.S.-made DVDs, CDs and similar material. Hollywood is not amused.

It's unclear whether the WTO will allow Antigua to exact such a pound of flesh. For now, the Antiguans are trying shame, accusing the United States of being a scofflaw. If Washington refuses to obey WTO rulings, the Antiguans say, other countries may follow suit, undermining global trade.

Cohen, the convicted gambling tycoon, has finished his probation but will not say what he's doing. He has nothing but scorn for U.S. trade policymakers.

"They're so stubborn," he said. "They want all these commitments from other countries, and tell them, 'Oh yeah, we're all equal.' But when they lose, they run away."
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on August 04, 2006, 06:48:04 AM
Some of these quotes are amazing:

In Georgia, Immigrants Unsettle Old Sense of Place
By RACHEL L. SWARNS
PEARSON, Ga. — For generations, people here have savored the predictable cadences of small-town living. They knew their neighbors and their neighbors’ neighbors, the sweet sound of Sunday church mornings and the rumble of tractors tilling the rich soil.

And they knew that most outsiders would drive right through this blue-collar community of tidy bungalows and mobile homes, without stopping or settling, on their way to bigger, busier places.

Then Mexican immigrants started streaming in. Lured in the 1990’s by abundant agricultural work and new manufacturing jobs, the newcomers landed in a town with one traffic light, no tortillas in the supermarket and residents who stared openly at foreigners in a county that saw its last wave of immigrants in the 1850’s.

Today, hundreds of Mexican immigrants, both illegal and legal, work in factories, fields and stores; study in public schools; and live in neighborhoods that were once mostly white or black. This year, as many longtime residents anguished over the metamorphosis of their town, Serafico Jaimes opened a Spanish-language video store right off Main Street and proudly hung a Mexican flag alongside his American flag in the storefront window.

“This is our town now, too,” Mr. Jaimes said.

His town sits in Atkinson County, Ga., population 8,030 and a cauldron of demographic change. Over the past decade, hundreds of thousands of immigrants, mostly from Mexico, have poured into the South, bypassing traditional settlement states like New York, California and Florida in favor of far-flung towns with thriving industries.

The surge of newcomers has helped drive the fierce debate in Congress over immigration as well as the budding activism that burst into view this spring when millions of people took to the streets to demand rights for immigrants.

The simmering tensions between Americans and new arrivals have played out here, too, far from the national spotlight. A visit to Atkinson County offers an intimate glimpse at how immigration is rapidly transforming day-to-day life in some small Southern towns.

In 1990, Hispanics accounted for 3 percent of the residents in Atkinson County, census data show. By 2004, Hispanics had eclipsed blacks and become the largest minority, with 21 percent of the population. County officials, who say illegal immigrants have been undercounted, believe Mexican immigrants and their children may actually make up a third of residents. (Whites and blacks now account for about 60 percent and 19 percent of the population.)

The sudden shift is upending traditional Southern notions of race and class, leaving many whites and blacks grappling with unexpected feelings of dislocation, loss and anger as they adjust to their community’s evolving ethnic identity.

Elton Corbitt, a white businessman whose family has lived here since the 1800’s, said immigration threatened everything that matters — the quality of schools, health facilities, neighborhoods, even the serene rhythms of small-town life. And he fears that white Southerners here may ultimately become outnumbered or irrelevant. [God forbid...]

“The way the Mexicans have children, they’re going to have a majority here soon,” Mr. Corbitt, 76, said.

“I have children and grandchildren,” he said. “They’re going to become second-class citizens. And we’re going to be a third world country here if we don’t do something about it.”

Many immigrants, meanwhile, wrestle with feelings of both pride and alienation as they deepen their roots in a town that remains ambivalent about their presence.

Olga Contreras-Martinez was 12 when she entered the United States illegally with her family and picked fruits and vegetables in Florida and Georgia until settling here in 1993. Now a college graduate and an American citizen, Ms. Contreras-Martinez feels deeply rooted here.

Yet she says she has never quite fit in, even as she slides seamlessly between English and Spanish, relishes both cheese grits and frijoles and proudly votes in local elections.

She still bursts into tears when she remembers how three white men challenged the citizenship of the county’s Hispanic voters during a race for county commission in 2004, accusing one candidate of registering Mexicans who were ineligible to vote. Mexican-Americans were ultimately allowed to go to the polls, but the humiliation lingers.

“Because of my color, my last name, people always question me,” said Ms. Contreras-Martinez, 31, whose parents, uncles and grandfather all moved to Atkinson County from Mexico.

“I call it home, but I know I’m not welcome in my own home,” she said. “Maybe that feeling of home will be something that will always be missing for me.”

From 1990 to 2005, the number of Hispanics living legally or illegally in Southern states quadrupled, jumping to 2.4 million from 562,663, according to an analysis of census data conducted by the sociology department of Queens College of the City University of New York. More immigrants are arriving in the United States now than when crowded ships carried millions of Europeans into New York in the early 1900’s.

“We really haven’t had this sort of rapid demographic change in 100 years,” said Jeffrey S. Passel, a demographer at the Pew Hispanic Center, a nonpartisan research group based in Washington.

No one knows how many illegal immigrants are living in Georgia. But Mr. Passel estimates there are 350,000 to 450,000, up from about 35,000 in 1990.

Creating New Lines

It is a profound change for this insular community in southern Georgia, just northeast of Valdosta, where strangers have traditionally come from neighboring counties, not foreign countries, and where memories of the last flood of immigrants have long since faded.

In the late 1850’s, hundreds of Irish immigrants moved to this area, drawn by the promise of work on a railroad project that ultimately failed. Penniless and stranded, many workers settled here and became farmers, according to archival records from the Roman Catholic Church, which ministered to the laborers.

The Mexicans who arrived more than a century later found a small, sleepy place where rocking chairs sit on front porches and roses bloom alongside rundown trailers. Many families struggle to make ends meet. In 2000, 23 percent of residents lived below the poverty line — compared with 13 percent nationally that year — and mobile homes made up 44 percent of the housing stock, census data show.

Before significant numbers of immigrants arrived, neighborhoods were largely divided along racial lines. And with population growth largely stagnant, commercial farmers who raised squash, cucumbers and tobacco, and new businesses manufacturing industrial fabrics, mobile homes and fiberboard, were eager for new labor.

Migrant farm workers, who trickled in in the late 1980’s, spread the word, telling relatives that Atkinson County had good jobs, good schools, open space and a better quality of life than many crowded, crime-ridden communities in border states.

Mr. Jaimes, the video store owner, who is 43, arrived in 1991 to pick peppers and cut tobacco. Jose Ponce came with his family in 1995, even as he worried about how Mexicans would fare in the American South.

“I had told myself, ‘Never will I live in that state,’ ” recalled Mr. Ponce, who saw a documentary about Georgia’s segregation era while he was still in Mexico.

“But the schools were good,” said Mr. Ponce, 54, who promotes homeopathic medicines for a Mexican company and is raising three children here. “There was work wherever you looked. In terms of security for the family, it was beautiful.”



Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on August 04, 2006, 06:48:37 AM
Today, Harvey’s, Pearson’s lone supermarket, dedicates three aisles to mole, tortillas, cilantro and other items directed at Hispanics, who now make up 40 percent to 50 percent of the store’s customers, said Rick Merritt, the manager.

Down the road at Guthrie Motors, a used-car dealership, 60 percent of the customers are Hispanic. At the local barbershop, where Arthur Aubrey Morgan has clipped hair since 1945, a third of the patrons hail from Mexico.

A karate school caters to the children of Mexican workers who have prospered enough to pay for classes. This spring, a Catholic church in a neighboring county opened a new building to accommodate worshipers at its Spanish-language Mass, which draws parishioners from Atkinson County.

And a half-dozen Hispanic-owned businesses have opened, including a bakery and several small grocery stores.

Pearson, which now has about 1,900 residents, was losing population before the Mexicans arrived. Tommy Guthrie, co-owner of Guthrie Motors, said the new arrivals had helped his business and others to thrive. Several of his Mexican-born customers, Mr. Guthrie added, have moved beyond his dealership because they can now buy new cars.

Immigrants have yet to play a significant role in politics — there are no Hispanic elected officials and only about 100 Hispanic registered voters — but many believe that will change as the American-born children of new arrivals come of age.

“I tell you something — they’re not staying down,” said Mr. Guthrie, who is white. “They’re moving up.”

But around the corner, at the county commission office, officials are counting the costs, not the benefits, of immigration to Atkinson County.

County Commissioner Edwin Davis Sr. serves as the informal leader of county efforts to stem the tide of illegal immigration. He sees the negative consequences everywhere — in the shabby mobile homes in some Hispanic enclaves, the Spanish-language graffiti splashed on the shopping plaza and the Hispanic mothers and toddlers crowding into the county’s health clinic.

“They’re coming here to have babies as quick as they can,” said Mr. Davis, who emphasized that he opposed illegal arrivals, not legal immigration. “And we’re paying for all of those babies.”

Rising Expenses

Mr. Davis acknowledged that homeowners had not yet felt the impact of illegal immigration in the form of higher property taxes, though he said that might be coming.

And police officials here disagree about whether crime has increased as immigration has surged. Pearson’s police chief says that it has not, the county sheriff says it has, though both say that illegal immigrants driving without licenses have become a growing problem and worry that gangs may infiltrate Hispanic neighborhoods.

But there is no doubt that the local clinic and schools have been hit with rising costs as immigrants and their children have turned to the county for services.

The public school population, which was 7 percent Hispanic in 1995, was nearly 30 percent Hispanic this year. State spending for teaching English to speakers of other languages here soared to $102,002 from $18,296 during that time. And the clinic has hired two Spanish-speaking interpreters since 1991.

Poor patients, including illegal immigrants, receive care subsidized by the state. And many residents complain about having to wait for flu shots behind Spanish-speaking immigrants.

“They done took over the population,” said Jimmy Roberts Jr., a black county commissioner, who said his constituents complained about immigrants receiving subsidized services. “I don’t think it’s right.”

This spring, the county approved a zoning regulation prohibiting anyone from bringing in trailers older than 20 years, a measure that some believe will raise rents and make it harder for poor Hispanics to live here. Mr. Davis and Mr. Roberts say the measure will protect immigrants from being forced into substandard housing.

Mr. Davis also supported the citizens who challenged Hispanic voters in the contested county commission race in 2004. The state attorney general is expected to hold a hearing soon to evaluate whether immigrants were improperly registered as voters in that race.

Meanwhile, Mr. Corbitt, the white businessman and property owner whose family has lived here since the 1800’s, proudly declares that he refuses to rent any of his buildings to Hispanic businessmen.

And when his church, First Baptist, considered allowing a Hispanic congregation to hold prayer meetings there, Mr. Corbitt led the opposition. “They’re bleeding hearts,” he said of the church members who voted him down.

Even whites who interact more frequently with the newcomers say they sometimes feel uneasy. Tasha Davis helps run the 4H Club and adores the Hispanic students who giggle and chatter at her desk.

But Mrs. Davis, who is not related to Edwin Davis, said the immigrants had begun to erode the cohesiveness of the community. “Before they come, everybody knew everybody,” she said. “Now you don’t know who is living in the trailer next to you or the second trailer from you.”

Reaching Across the Divide

Fernando Amador Trejo, 37, fumes at such talk. Mr. Amador came here as a migrant worker 12 years ago and now owns two grocery stores, one in Pearson and the other in a neighboring county.

Yet, he says, he has been stopped by the police without good reason and treated with indifference or hostility by whites here. Mr. Amador has never been invited to join the county’s Chamber of Commerce, he said. And the white businessmen and workers who work near him in the town’s only shopping plaza have never formally introduced themselves.

“They call me, ‘the Mexican,’ ” Mr. Amador said bitterly. “I am Mexican. But I have a name, too.”

But as they mingle in stores, neighborhoods and on factory floors, some Southerners and immigrants are trying to reach across the divide.

The Chamber of Commerce, for instance, is now considering recruiting immigrant business owners. On one recent afternoon, Mark von Waldner, the chamber chairman, came into Mr. Jaimes’ new video store for the first time and shook his hand.

“Patrón!” he called out, trying his fledgling Spanish.

On a local Spanish-language radio program, Mr. Ponce recently challenged his fellow immigrants to do more to connect to native-born whites and blacks. “How many of us have been here for 10 years and still don’t speak English?” asked Mr. Ponce, who makes a point of greeting everyone he meets. “That has got to change.”

And late last year at Atkinson County High School, where students say whites, blacks and Hispanics still socialize in largely separate worlds, Sara Silva, 16, and Kinnon Holt, 17, decided to go on a date.

Kinnon, who is white, and Sara, the American-born daughter of Mexican immigrants, have been together for eight months now. He has sampled his first empanada and she has tasted her first Hot Pocket, which she gleefully dubbed “an American burrito.”

“That’s my dream, getting married, having kids, having my own little shop here, having a farm,” said Sara, who hopes to open a beauty salon. “This town is pretty much my life.”

Atkinson County is Ms. Contreras-Martinez’s life, too. She lives comfortably among white and Hispanic neighbors and has worked in so many county jobs — once teaching Spanish to county workers — that many white government employees greet her by name.

But the memory of the 2004 election still burns, as do the slights from whites who speak disparagingly of Hispanics in her presence, assuming she cannot speak English.

Sometimes, she says she feels as if she does not belong anywhere at all, not in Georgia and not in Mexico.

“You’re not from here; you’re not from there,” said Ms. Contreras-Martinez, who coordinates a high school program for migrant workers. Yet when her husband gently suggests that they move to Edcouch, Tex., the mostly Hispanic city where he grew up, she always resists.

She has a baby boy now, the first generation of her family to be born in the county. She dreams of watching him run in the wide open spaces of this little town that she has grown to love, despite everything.

“I’m a Latina Grits — a Latina girl raised in the South,” Ms. Contreras-Martinez said. “So I’m still here.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/08/04/us/04georgia.html?hp&ex=1154750400&en=f41ddc8bc4745d95&ei=5094&partner=homepage
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: crazy8 on August 04, 2006, 06:58:34 AM
Wow, that was pretty funny...ignorant but funny nonetheless.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on August 04, 2006, 07:05:38 AM
Wow, that was pretty funny...ignorant but funny nonetheless.

Agreed.  Back home, the first Mexican family to move in first worked on the horse farm, then at the most popular restaurant in the next town over, a "catfish kitchen."  Lol, how about last year, they bought their own building and copied the catfish kitchen's menu word-for-word.  I know some folks are mad :D. (but it sho' does taste good!)
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: crazy8 on August 04, 2006, 07:13:19 AM
LOL.  Now THAT's funny as hell!  :D  See why can't black people do that more often? :D  You know they don't know ish about Southern food, but are probably rivaling them in business.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on August 04, 2006, 07:22:39 AM
LOL.  Now THAT's funny as hell!  :D  See why can't black people do that more often? :D  You know they don't know ish about Southern food, but are probably rivaling them in business.

EXACTLY.  That's why we can't get ahead.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: faith2005 on August 04, 2006, 07:48:18 AM
this story made me lol! esp. with the pictures and the myspace twist. classic.

(http://www.nydailynews.com/ips_rich_content/562-bruno_rachel.JPG)

(http://www.nydailynews.com/ips_rich_content/229-savage_john.JPG)

New York Daily News - http://www.nydailynews.com
Saved from pimp
BY JOE MAHONEY in Albany and ALISON GENDAR in New York
DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITERS
Thursday, August 3rd, 2006

Senate majority leader Joe Bruno's missing granddaughter was found yesterday wandering the streets of Times Square with a self-declared pimp - who uses the Internet to entice young women into selling their bodies, police sources said.
Rachel Bruno, a beautiful 20-year-old blond, ran away from her parents' upstate home last week after meeting the married grifter, John Savage, on MySpace.com, the sources said.

Images of half-naked women and piles of money decorate Savage's MySpace page, which declares: "pimpin at its best."

"I believe that I'm the solution for those who r lost or need elevation to there situation," Savage writes. "My name is Jazzo and my interests in myspace is to meet beautiful young women that want to travel and get down wit a playa."

Police were investigating if the admitted 30-year-old pimp had committed a crime relating to Rachel Bruno's disappearance. He was arrested on an unrelated outstanding warrant.

Cops found Bruno on W. 45th St. near Broadway shortly before 2 a.m.

Savage - who lists his occupation as "entertainment" and his income as "$60,000 to $75,000" on MySpace - was idling nearby in a new SUV. The cops asked Bruno to call him and tell him to drive over. When he did, they grabbed him, sources said.

"She was hysterically weeping," Joe Bruno said after his granddaughter was found.

"She was relieved to be home and scared to death and afraid she would be harmed," the Republican added, before saying his granddaughter suffers from anorexia and "serious emotional problems" that affect her judgment.

Savage was being held by cops on a probation violation. He has been on probation since pleading guilty to attempting to bribe Bronx cops, offering them $690 for information on prostitution sweeps in 2002.

"You know we have a new mayor and police commissioner and they are going to start cracking down on prostitution. They are hitting me hard," Savage told the cop. "Whatever you and your man can do for me I'll pay you money if you let me know when they're coming out to pick up the hoes."

Savage violated his probation in 2004 when he was arrested in Saratoga Springs for allegedly giving strawberry-flavored Smirnoff vodka and a 12-pack of Pabst Blue Ribbon beer to his teenage stepson and the boy's pals, authorities said.

State Police Superintendent Wayne Bennett said if cops find a reason to charge Savage with a crime related to Rachel Bruno's disappearance "then we most certainly will."

Savage does not hide his lewd agenda on MySpace.

Under the heading "Who I'd like to meet," he says: "Young fine classy women who r open minded to a different way of life. And must be sexy."

"I think when your [sexy], classy or fine you should get what's coming to, like all the money," he says. "I am here with the perfect opportunity for you to travel with me and achieve the finer thing in life."

He later notes: "You must be 18 older. Send picture."

Savage, who says on MySpace that he runs MusthaveIt Escorts, and Rachel Bruno met up last Thursday near Albany and then headed to New York City on Sunday after her well-connected grandfather launched a massive search, authorities said.

Rachel Bruno had a brief telephone conversation with her mother on Monday and said she was fine. But Bennett said the young woman called her mom again Tuesday "in tears and said she wanted to come home."

The state police called the NYPD and investigators tracked down Bruno after tracing her cell phone calls, sources said.

She was being examined by doctors yesterday. Her friends described her as easily manipulated.

Bennett insisted Bruno's case was handled no differently from any other missing-person case.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Inquirer on August 04, 2006, 08:04:34 AM
"Elevation of their situation"  :D  That article was hilarious !!

The hispanics taking over the backwoods of GA made me laugh too  :D
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: mivida2k on August 05, 2006, 06:17:59 AM
(http://static.crooksandliars.com/2006/08/kicktheredout.jpg)


Bush Starts 10-Day Texas Vacation
Shorter Summer Break Reflects Post-Katrina Criticism


By Michael A. Fletcher
Washington Post Staff Writer
Friday, August 4, 2006; Page A09

WACO, Tex., Aug. 3 -- President Bush arrived here Thursday evening to begin a 10-day stretch at his Prairie Chapel ranch, his longest planned period away from Washington during this summer vacation season.

Bush's scheduled week and a half in Texas is a far cry from last year's working vacation, which was shaping up as the longest presidential retreat in more than three decades before it was rudely cut short by Hurricane Katrina after nearly a month.

 

President Bush walks across the South Lawn to board a helicopter before beginning 10 days in Texas. (By J. Scott Applewhite -- Associated Press)

VIDEO | President Bush began a week-long working vacation with a stop along the U.S.-Mexico border and a plea for lawmakers to put the finishing touches on immigration reform.

The Immigration Debate
 The Washington Post's coverage of the immigration issue, from the politics of revising the nation's immigration laws to the impact of illegal immigration on the U.S.-Mexico border and the Washington region.

The image of Bush on an extended stay away from the White House while Katrina flattened much of the Gulf Coast and left New Orleans engulfed by floodwater proved to be a defining moment of his presidency.

The image of a president who critics say is aloof from details and too eager to delegate was only driven home when he ordered Air Force One to fly low over the stricken region so he could get a bird's-eye view of the destruction as he returned to Washington.

"It's devastating, it's got to be doubly devastating on the ground," Bush said as he flew over the area.

"The impact of Katrina was profound," said former White House press secretary Ari Fleischer. "It caught a tired White House staff off guard and turned out to be one of the most damaging events of his presidency."

Last year's vacation was even more problematic for Bush because of the protests led by Cindy Sheehan, the peace activist whose son was killed in Iraq. Sheehan camped out on the road leading to Bush's ranch last year promising not to leave until he agreed to meet with her, drawing international news coverage and large numbers of supporters to Crawford, while helping to galvanize opposition to the war. She recently bought five acres near Crawford, which she plans to use as a base for future protests while Bush is in town.

This year, with the crisis in the Middle East at a fever pitch, the carnage in Iraq continuing and even the first hurricane of the year brewing in the Caribbean, the president's schedulers left less room for this year's vacation to cause such political damage.

Before going to his ranch, Bush stopped in McAllen, Tex., where he inspected Border Patrol equipment before delivering a speech in nearby Mission, Tex. He heralded the deployment of 6,000 National Guard troops along the border and called on Congress to enact his stalled proposal to revamp the nation's immigration laws.

Bush said the initiative will work only if it includes both tougher enforcement and a temporary-worker program that would allow low-skill immigrants a legal path into the country. "We have an obligation to secure our borders, and we have an obligation to treat people with dignity and respect," he said.

Over the weekend, Bush is scheduled to meet at his ranch with Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice. Later in the week, he is scheduled to travel to Wisconsin for the day to campaign for Republican congressional candidate John Gard before returning to Washington on Aug. 13.

White House press secretary Tony Snow said that "while everybody recognizes what happened with Katrina" the president's vacation schedule this year is "driven by sheer necessity."

With a large number of GOP congressional seats in play and his party's ability to set the agenda in Congress in jeopardy, Snow said, Bush wants to be sure to be on the road to help raise money and get his message out in hopes of improving his approval ratings, which have been abysmal for much of the past year.

Bush is not the first president to be criticized for spending time away from Washington. More than a century ago, Ulysses S. Grant was pilloried for his retreats to the Jersey Shore. President Bill Clinton often spent vacations at friends' homes in places such as Martha's Vineyard and twice vacationed in Jackson Hole, Wyo., a locale his political handlers said would play well among swing voters.

President Lyndon B. Johnson spent 474 days at his Texas spread during his five-plus years as president, far surpassing the 370 days that Bush has spent in Texas since his election, according to U.S. News & World Report. White House aides are quick to point out that Bush remains in command even when he is far from the Oval Office. He continues to receive his normal security briefings and holds meeting with top aides and foreign leaders during his working vacations. The president also likes to use his down time to mountain-bike around his 1,500-acre ranch and to do chores such as clearing brush.

"We've reached a point in the modern presidency where any vacation the president takes hurts in some way, because the world and the media move so fast," Fleischer said. " . . . The normal things that everyone else does, if the president does it he gets criticized."

While Bush plans to curtail his long stretches away from Washington this year, he still plans to spend most of the coming month out of town. He has planned long weekends at Camp David and the Bush family compound in Kennebunkport, Maine, for August, before returning to Texas before the Labor Day weekend.

"The president certainly took some hits for being so relentlessly on vacation during Katrina," said Bruce Buchanan, a University of Texas political scientist. "One reason to break up the time away is to signal that there is some activity going on there."
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on August 05, 2006, 06:22:22 AM
I don't see anything wrong with working somewhere other than Washington.  Heck, I'd probably buy a pad in Hawaii and set up shop 8).
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: mivida2k on August 05, 2006, 06:47:03 AM
I don't see anything wrong with working somewhere other than Washington.  Heck, I'd probably buy a pad in Hawaii and set up shop 8).


Put the glass away.  Just say no to alcohol. :D
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on August 05, 2006, 07:10:50 AM
Lol.  Seriously, with today's technology, the President can work from anywhere.  That might even be better for national security.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: crazy8 on August 05, 2006, 07:18:39 AM
I was reading an article about Blair postponing his vacation because of all that is going on in Lebanon.  He has little kids, but Dubya is out. :D
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: crazy8 on August 05, 2006, 07:21:41 AM
BP Blair is coming to visit ya!  8)

Blair Delays Vacation to Work on Mideast

By BETH GARDINER
The Associated Press
Friday, August 4, 2006



LONDON -- British Prime Minister Tony Blair postponed his summer vacation Friday to stay in London and help develop a U.N. resolution on the Middle East crisis.

Blair believes the coming days are crucial for securing agreement on a resolution to end three weeks of warfare between Israel and Hezbollah militants in Lebanon, a spokeswoman said.

He had planned to leave Friday, and could start his holiday over the weekend, depending on what happens on the resolution and in the Middle East, his office said.

While Blair can speak to other world leaders by phone when on vacation, he did not want to be out of touch Friday on a long-haul flight, the spokeswoman said.

Blair "will be continuing his intensive diplomacy with world leaders from Downing Street," she said, speaking on condition of anonymity in keeping with government policy.he conflict on Hezbollah militants, saying they must be disarmed if any peace is to last.

Blair's office does not provide details of his travel plans for security reasons, but he reportedly plans a family holiday in Barbados.

President Bush, however, went ahead with his vacation plans despite the turmoil in the Mideast. Bush already had planned a shortened stay at his beloved Texas ranch this summer, with tensions high in Iraq, Iran and North Korea and his party in jeopardy of losing control of Congress this fall.

Bush plans to stay just 10 days at the ranch _ his shortest August getaway since taking office _ and he summoned Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice to come down for the weekend to discuss diplomatic efforts.

White House spokesman Tony Snow said Bush spent Friday clearing brush and riding his bike. He also had his regular briefings and took a call from U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan that lasted 15 minutes.

"There is a lot going on right now, and, unfortunately, it does not provide enough time or space for an extended vacation," Snow said.

Blair on Friday discussed the wording of the proposed resolution in a phone call with Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert. He also spoke to French President Jacques Chirac, Italian Premier Romano Prodi and Swedish Prime Minister Goran Persson, his office said.

Later, Blair spoke by phone with Annan and met a delegation of Lebanese officials and Lebanon's ambassador to Britain, Jihad Mortada.

The prime minister said at his monthly news conference Thursday he hoped that a U.N. resolution could be agreed soon that would bring an end to the fighting. Negotiations on the nature and mandate of an international peacekeeping force would follow, he said.

The prime minister has refused to call for Israel to halt its offensive in southern Lebanon. He instead has placed the onus for ending the conflict on Hezbollah militants, saying they must be disarmed if any peace is to last. That position has sparked a furor in Parliament and the media.

Seventy percent of Britons questioned in a survey said Blair should call for an immediate cease-fire. The poll of 1,011 people, conducted by ICM pollsters for Channel Four News, had a margin of error of three percentage points.

Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on August 05, 2006, 07:25:16 AM
I was reading an article about Blair postponing his vacation because of all that is going on in Lebanon.  He has little kids, but Dubya is out. :D

Meh.  He'll be postponing his vacation forever if he's waiting for peace in the Middle East.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: mivida2k on August 05, 2006, 07:26:14 AM
I was reading an article about Blair postponing his vacation because of all that is going on in Lebanon.  He has little kids, but Dubya is out. :D

Meh.  He'll be postponing his vacation forever if he's waiting for peace in the Middle East.

At least Blair is taking his work seriously. ;)
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: crazy8 on August 05, 2006, 07:27:52 AM
I was reading an article about Blair postponing his vacation because of all that is going on in Lebanon.  He has little kids, but Dubya is out. :D

Meh.  He'll be postponing his vacation forever if he's waiting for peace in the Middle East.

At least Blair is taking his work seriously. ;)

Exactly...he's waiting a whole day before he leaves since he won't be reachable by phone while he's in route to Barbados. :D
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on August 05, 2006, 07:34:13 AM
Lol, I see Bush wants Condi to come with him on vacay....
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: mivida2k on August 05, 2006, 07:58:21 AM
Lol, I see Bush wants Condi to come with him on vacay....

I think we all know the story of Bush and Condi.

As Whoopi said.....You don't see Laura walking off of Air Force One smiling like that..... ;)
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: mivida2k on August 06, 2006, 12:36:50 PM
For the fellas:

Hundreds expected to come to Masturbate-a-thon

LONDON (Reuters) - Hundreds of Britons are being urged to attend what is being branded as Europe's first "Masturbate-a-thon", a leading reproductive healthcare charity said on Friday.
 
Marie Stopes International, which is hosting the event with        HIV/        AIDS charity the Terrence Higgins Trust, said it expected up to 200 people to attend the sponsored masturbation session in Clerkenwell, central London, on Saturday.

"It is a bit of a publicity stunt but we hope it will raise awareness," a Marie Stopes spokeswoman told Reuters.

"We want to get people talking about safer sex, masturbation and to lift taboos."

Participants, who have to be over 18, can bring any aids they need and can take part in four different rooms -- a comfort area, a mixed area, along with men and women only areas.

However, the rules on the event's Web site states there can be no touching of other participants nor are people allowed to fake orgasms.

"The amount you raise will be determined by how many minutes you masturbate and/or how many orgasms you achieve," the Web site said.

The Marie Stopes spokeswoman said local religious groups had been initially outraged, but after people had heard what the event was about, most had approved it.

Police had also given it their approval.

Similar events have been staged in San Francisco for the last six years raising $25,000 (13,000 pounds) for women's health initiatives and HIV prevention. If successful, Marie Stopes said it could take place elsewhere in mainland Europe next year.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: mivida2k on August 06, 2006, 12:47:46 PM
If John Galt had done this he would be in jail.

Duke lacrosse player pleads in DWI case 

CHAPEL HILL, N.C. - A member of the Duke University men's lacrosse team has pleaded guilty to driving while impaired, and prosecutors in return dropped a marijuana possession charge.

Matthew Peter Wilson of Durham, a rising senior who played midfielder on the team, is not among the athletes charged with raping an exotic dancer at a team party in March. But his arrest in May added fuel to complaints about the team's players.

He was suspended from the team after his arrest.

Wilson was stopped by Chapel Hill police May 24 after running a red light. Officers said they found marijuana in his vehicle and that Wilson registered a blood-alcohol level of 0.21 percent.

He pleaded guilty to the driving while impaired charge July 20 in Orange County District Court.

Wilson received a 30-day suspended jail sentence and was put on probation for a year. His driving privileges were restricted and he was ordered to pay $410 in fines and fees. He also must complete 24 hours of community service over the next few months.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: John Galt on August 06, 2006, 06:00:13 PM
hahahah so true  :D
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Burning Sands, Esq. on August 06, 2006, 06:27:04 PM
yeah jack and jill is weird. I knew alot of people in jack and jill, but my parents couldn't afford all of that stuff. the kids in it sorta looked down on me. most of them ended up going to hbcu's. my friend who went to prep school in boston had a similar experience. (which plays into my idea that hbcus are schools for elite black people, while the middle class/immigrants scrape their way into other pwis). and now they're really friendly. there is a sort of fakeness about it--like they didn't think i was good enough to commune with them and their ilk until i went to yale. there were some jj kids at yale (not necessarily acting that way though), but I knew more growing up. i don't know if i want my kids to act like that.



I don't know if HBCU's create elitism among blacks but do I know that elitism is definitely very prevelant there.  Definitely morso than at PWI's.  At PWI's you might have one or two snobby kids here or there among the already small black community, but at HBCU's the number is, of course, multiplied into entire cliques.

Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: John Galt on August 06, 2006, 07:10:42 PM
Yeah, I really couldn't get down with a lot of the cats at Howard. Many of them seem preoccupied with themselves. Also their prioritization skills were whack (1. Party 2. Party 3. Party).

Jack and Jill is definitely a snobbish group although I met some of my closest friends through Jack and Jill. My mom wants my kids to do Jack and Jill, so whoever that lucky lady that gets me is probably going to have to join. MWUAHAHAHA!
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: mivida2k on August 06, 2006, 07:47:19 PM
The lady won't be lucky - you will.    :-*
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: John Galt on August 06, 2006, 07:49:42 PM
But of course, I gotta hype myself up though :P
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: One Step Ahead on August 06, 2006, 07:51:13 PM
so Galt you are a Jack and Jill kid?  that means you have the power to invite, right?  I'll be expecting my invitation when the time comes...
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on August 06, 2006, 07:54:08 PM
Ha, what happened to the OSA Support Group for Gifted Poor Kids?
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: One Step Ahead on August 06, 2006, 07:57:25 PM
what can I say?  I like declining invitations
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on August 06, 2006, 08:03:35 PM
Um hmmm.  Don't front.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: One Step Ahead on August 06, 2006, 08:10:29 PM
ok it is like the big party of the year--you may not want to go, but you at least want the option
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on August 06, 2006, 08:17:19 PM
ok it is like the big party of the year--you may not want to go, but you at least want the option

Lol, what, to know that you're "in"?  OSA, since when do you need such external validation? :P
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: John Galt on August 06, 2006, 08:45:32 PM
so Galt you are a Jack and Jill kid?  that means you have the power to invite, right?  I'll be expecting my invitation when the time comes...

Yep, I'm a jack and jill kid. I don't know if males have the power to invite, but I know whoever I marry can automatically get in.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: One Step Ahead on August 06, 2006, 09:01:58 PM
ok it is like the big party of the year--you may not want to go, but you at least want the option

Lol, what, to know that you're "in"?  OSA, since when do you need such external validation? :P

since choosing which law school to attend  :'(
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on August 07, 2006, 04:01:12 AM
Lol.  Right.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Inquirer on August 07, 2006, 07:06:24 AM
*Has anyone ever bought something from them??*

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Their mission is to help combat this negativity and complacency with a modern-day civil rights movement; more aptly named the Black Empowerment Movement, using educational and economic empowerment as central themes. Initially, they are using fashion as a vehicle to achieve their goals, but they plan on expanding to other media and entertainment outlets in the very near future. DangerousNEGRO is taking Black intellectualism and social consciousness back to the streets!

DangerousNegro.com is a business dedicated to uplifting the Black community through fashion, entertainment, and various philanthropic endeavors. They've started on this mission by creating a line of attractive Black Empowerment Apparel that will engage the Black community intellectually as well as stylistically. With creative designs and positive empowering messages, dangerousNegro.com seeks to diminish the lure of degenerate Black mentalities and refocus the Black community towards positive reconstruction.

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Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: One Step Ahead on August 07, 2006, 07:15:14 AM
I feel dangerous just looking at those shirts
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: pikey on August 07, 2006, 07:22:01 AM
I feel dangerous just looking at those shirts

Lol, I think I might order one.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: One Step Ahead on August 07, 2006, 07:23:34 AM
I feel dangerous just looking at those shirts

Lol, I think I might order one.

which one are you thinking of?

btw--where is that Barkley quote from?
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: AshyLarry on August 07, 2006, 07:36:57 AM
AKRON, Ala. - An employee in one west Alabama town received pay for vacation time and sick leave while jailed on attempted murder charges. Robert White is in the county jail. Police believe he?s one of several Akron residents who allegedly fired on Moundville residents attempting a birthday party on July 5.

Six people were wounded in the shooting, and two of those people had to have a leg amputated.

Moundville?s mayor said the town?s attorney told the City Council that White could not be fired because he had not been convicted of a crime.

Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: pikey on August 07, 2006, 07:40:29 AM
I feel dangerous just looking at those shirts

Lol, I think I might order one.

which one are you thinking of?


Of course now my computer won't let me see the shirts, but from what I remember, I kinda like the Stereotype shirt and the it aint easy shirt.



btw--where is that Barkley quote from?
Lol, I was watching PTI sometime last week or the week before when Charles Barkley was talking about running for governor of Alabama as soon as 2010.
CB:  says something about Republicans
Interviewer: Did you just say you're a Republican?
CB: No, I said I'm rich like a Republican!  To be a Republican today, something has to be wrong with you.

There were more quotable comments, but that's all that I remember.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: One Step Ahead on August 07, 2006, 07:43:42 AM
Barkley is a hot mess but hilarious and sometimes right on target
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: mivida2k on August 07, 2006, 08:16:33 AM
Love those t-shirts.  Especially the independent woman and I'm Bossy (angry black woman).

For the fellas:

(http://www.spreadshirt.com/image.php?type=image&partner_id=61905&product_id=1116298&img_id=1&size=big&bgcolor_images=white)

 :D
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: pikey on August 07, 2006, 08:20:22 AM
Love those t-shirts.  Especially the independent woman and I'm Bossy (angry black woman).

For the fellas:

(http://www.spreadshirt.com/image.php?type=image&partner_id=61905&product_id=1116298&img_id=1&size=big&bgcolor_images=white)

 :D

I really like that one.  Thought about getting it for the bf, but i don't wanna give anyone else ideas!  ;)
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: mivida2k on August 07, 2006, 08:21:25 AM
Love those t-shirts.  Especially the independent woman and I'm Bossy (angry black woman).

For the fellas:

(http://www.spreadshirt.com/image.php?type=image&partner_id=61905&product_id=1116298&img_id=1&size=big&bgcolor_images=white)

 :D

I really like that one.  Thought about getting it for the bf, but i don't wanna give anyone else ideas!  ;)


Galt said that he wanted to lose his independence. 8)
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: mivida2k on August 07, 2006, 11:09:21 AM
Lawyers say many left out of tax refund
By PETE YOST, Associated Press Writer
Fri Aug 4, 9:52 PM ET
 


WASHINGTON - Millions of small businesses and low-income taxpayers will be shortchanged or excluded altogether from a Bush administration tax refund program, lawyers who have filed a class-action lawsuit in the controversy said Friday.
 
The criticism comes amid a        Treasury Department plan in which the public stopped paying a 3 percent federal excise tax on long-distance phone calls as of July 31. The tax collected by phone service providers had been levied without congressional authorization.

The government says taxpayers can get back the last three years of the excise tax payments by asking for the money on their 2006 tax returns. The Treasury Department said recently that $13 billion will be refunded, but it provided no estimates of how much the average phone customer might receive.

Many senior citizens and other phone customers will get no refund because their income is so low that they don't have to file tax returns. A study by the nonprofit Center on Budget and Policy Priorities found more than 10 million households will be left out of the tax rebate program.

"Since I do not file a tax return, it does not seem right that I am expected to fill out a tax return because of what someone else took from me illegally," James Gillis, 78, stated in a declaration in the lawsuit.

The IRS said it is developing a "very simple, straightforward form" for low-income people to file next year to get a refund.

"We recognize there are many people who have no filing requirements and we want to make sure that these people get the refund they deserve," the IRS said in a statement.

Attorneys in the class-action suit filed in U.S. District Court in Washington say consumers ought to be entitled to refunds covering most of the past decade, not just the past three years. A study by Congressional Research Service estimated that $6 billion a year had been collected from the long-distance phone customers.

The tax has been levied for decades, dating back to when long-distance phone charges were based on time and distances of the calls. Many companies long ago dropped the distance factor and began charging a flat per-minute rate. The government continued to collect the tax, even though Congress had not amended the tax law to reflect the change in long-distance charges.

Large businesses started filing lawsuits, winning favorable court decisions. In May, the government stopped fighting the lawsuits, and the        Internal Revenue Service issued the refund rule without seeking public comment.

"They met illegally behind closed doors and the refund is only a fraction of what the government took," said Jonathan Cuneo, a lead attorney in the class-action case that the Bush administration is asking the court to dismiss.

Small businesses that lack the time or money to collect the last three years of their phone bills will be forced to rely on an IRS formula that is likely to shortchange recipients, said Cuneo.

"It would be very impractical for us to spend the time and money to go through our company's old phone bills and determine the amount of money that we shouldn't have paid in the first place," said Peter Loevy, founder of Catering By Design in Conshohocken, Pa., and a plaintiff in the court case.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: scurred1 on August 07, 2006, 07:48:44 PM

Focus: Sex tourism in Jamaica
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Sex, sand and sugar mummies in a Caribbean beach fantasy
A controversial new West End play will explore sex tourism in Jamaica, where lonely women flock for flings with young black men. But are these holiday romances sleazy or simply harmless?

Lorna Martin at Negril Beach
Sunday July 23, 2006

Observer

The following correction was printed in the Observer's For the record column, Sunday July 30 2006

The article below describes the Jamaican flag as bright green, red and yellow. This is Ethiopia's flag, favoured by Jamaica's Rastafarians. Jamaica's flag is green, yellow and black.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


We're businessmen,' says Leroy proudly. 'We sell ganja, coke and good lovin'.' His grin spreads to his eyes as he touches fists with his friend Sean. It's a traditional male Jamaican greeting expressing good wishes, friendship and respect. Sean responds, bumping his closed fist atop Leroy's. 'Respect man, to the businessmen.'

It's 10am on Jamaica's breathtaking Negril beach. Bleached white sand, swaying palms and crystalline Caribbean waters stretch into the distance for seven miles. It looks endless and, on a first impression, this could be paradise. But Negril is not as dreamlike as it looks. It is no longer visited primarily for sun, sea and sand. Instead it is the destination of choice for an increasing number of British female sex tourists. An estimated 80,000 single women, from teenagers to grandmothers, flock to the island every year and use the services of around 200 men known as 'rent a dreads', 'rastitutes' or 'the Foreign Service' who make this resort their headquarters.

Female sex tourism is nothing new. It was reported in the late 1840s, when an Englishwoman went to Rome to take a lover. But in recent years it has grown in popularity. These days the women who participate are more likely to be single professionals than bored Shirley Valentine housewives. With females staying single longer and rising divorce rates, these holidays are expected to explode in popularity in the years ahead. Consequently they are the subject of a sudden flurry of books, films and plays examining the motivations of women who travel for sex, love and affection.

Earlier this month Heading South, a thought-provoking French film about a single 55-year-old sex tourist in Seventies Haiti, opened to rave reviews. Starring Charlotte Rampling, it tells the story of a disenchanted English professor who finds a new, more rewarding passion in the bodies of young black men which, she discovers, can be bought for sums trifling to the affluent. In the film Rampling's character Ellen observes: 'If you're over 40 and not as dumb as a fashion model, the only guys who are interested are natural-born losers or husbands whose wives are cheating on them.'

At the beginning of next month the Royal Court theatre in London, never afraid of controversy, will go nearer the knuckle than ever when it stages Sugar Mummies. Lynda Bellingham, the Oxo Mum who became the wholesome face of family values in TV commercials, plays one of four middle-aged women who visit Jamaica to sample male prostitutes. There is lots and lots of sex.

Before it has even opened, the play has ignited a heated debate about the rights and wrongs of female sex tourism: is it harmless fun, a mutually beneficial business transaction? Or is it exploitation and, if so, who is the victim and who is the perpetrator - the women who fall for declarations of true love or the mostly poor, underemployed men who make them? What makes it different from male sex tourism, which is normally seen as sleazy and abhorrent? And is it, as many critics argue, perpetuating the racist myth of the hyper-sexual black man?

The gigolos working on Negril beach offer a simple explanation for their role in what is commonly, though euphemistically, called 'romance tourism'.

'For us it's a fun and easy way to make money,' says Leroy. 'For her, she gets some real good lovin'. All the English ladies who come here complain about the men back home. They say they are cold and selfish, mechanical and uncomplimentary. We know how to make a lady feel good.'

His friend explains that there is no welfare state in Jamaica. Staff who work in the hotels, which charge guests from about £120 a night, earn between £40 and £50 a week. The hard-working and high-earning but lonely western women who come to the island seem like millionaires. 'We are all poor in Jamaica. What we do is more fun and more money than working in a hotel.'

It can be extremely lucrative, but the idea that the men charge a certain price for a set service simply doesn't happen. There seems to be a mutual but tacitly agreed deception at the heart of the gigolo-client relationship. Payment is rarely mentioned because this would shatter the illusion that she is the most beautiful woman he has ever seen and he has fallen desperately in love with her. Instead, after charming the women and offering to be their guide, the gigolos set about, sometimes in subtle ways, extracting as much money as possible.

Leroy and Sean, who are both 22, spot two large white women who look around fortyish. They saunter towards them, taking in any obvious weaknesses.

'Good morning, beautiful ladies. Welcome to Jamaica,' says Leroy, offering his fist to one of the women. 'Respect,' adds Sean, as he gazes deep into the pale blue eyes of her friend.

In the distance you can hear other beach boys advertising some of their more conventional wares: 'Coconut, pineapple, mangoes, bananas, Marlboros.' Hand-painted signs, invariably in the bright green, red and yellow colours of the country's flag, invite tourists to stop for breakfast of ackee fruit and salt fish. Other stalls sell aloe vera massages, hair braiding, handmade jewellery and carvings. Even in the morning, it is possible to detect the unmistakable smell of marijuana wafting in the faint breeze.

The women awkwardly offer their fists in response and introduce themselves. They arrived the previous evening from Miami. It is their first morning on the beach.

'You are gorgeous,' Leroy tells one of them, whose attractiveness isn't immediately apparent. 'What part of heaven did you fall from?'

A policeman wanders past, observing but not intervening. Later he tells me it is usually the women who complain on the rare occasions that the force does apprehend hustlers.

She grins at her friend, clearly flattered but not completely fooled. 'Beautiful ladies, some of the men here will hassle you and rip you off,' he warns, appearing genuinely concerned for their wellbeing. 'You need someone to look after you. To show you around. Take you to the waterfalls, the Blue Mountains and the caves and the best parties.' He smiles coquettishly.

The two women look at each other like nervous schoolgirls and giggle. They say they think they are a bit too old for the men.

'No, you ageless,' Leroy continues, shaking his head. 'We are real men. In Jamaica, real men like the cat, not the kitten. And real men like real women. Mature and intelligent and beautiful women like you.'

To some people, their well-rehearsed chat-up lines might sound corny, a bit nauseating, somewhat transparent. But for plenty of women the words are just what they have been longing to hear. They agree to meet later that night at the reggae party on the beach.

When I ask Leroy what he does if he's not attracted to a woman, he responds matter of factly: 'Close my eyes and pretend it's Beyoncé.'

Not far from them, strolling along the water's edge are Jackie, a 38-year-old single woman who works in London as an advertising manager, and Andrew, 24. Jackie is short with dark hair and a plain but attractive face. She met Andrew, tall and slender but solidly built, during a holiday to the island with two girlfriends last December. She has returned to spend a week with him. Only one close friend knows she is here.

'I'd heard about these guys who trawl the beach and I wondered what kind of stupid woman would fall for that kind of thing,' Jackie says. 'At first when Andrew approached me, I dismissed him. I hadn't come here looking for any kind of relationship. I came to get over one.

'But he persisted. He wooed and charmed me. He was funny and very complimentary. I was with my friends and I was a bit worried that they would disapprove. But I thought, "what the hell, you only live once". And I suppose there was a bit of me that wanted to do something slightly adventurous.'

Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: scurred1 on August 07, 2006, 07:49:12 PM
Like many of the women here, Jackie is offended by any suggestion that she is merely a sex tourist and that Andrew is, in effect, a prostitute.

'I see nothing immoral about it. I regard it more as a temporary love affair. He tells me all the things I want to hear, and I guess in return I pay for everything - meals, accommodation, transport, tours - and buy him gifts. But that is because I have much more money than he does. It is mutually beneficial,' she insists.

'When he tells me I'm the most beautiful woman he has ever seen and that he loves my body, I know it might not be absolutely true, but it's nice to hear. The affection, attention, intimacy and compliments are equally, if not more, important to me than the sexual aspect of the relationship.'

Jackie said Andrew raised the money issue the morning after they had first slept together. He told her he could not afford to pay his rent and needed to get his car repaired. She has been sending cash to him every month ever since.

Set on Negril beach, Sugar Mummies explores the pleasures and perils of female sex tourism. Playwright Tanika Gupta, who spent two weeks in Jamaica researching the subject, has focused on a group of British and American women seeking sun, sea, sand and uninhibited sex with good-looking strangers.

During her visit, she identified four types of female sex tourist. The 'Ibiza-type' are young, frisky and just looking for a good time. 'Many of them were sexy, beautiful, young and slim,' says Gupta. 'But because they didn't have that much money, the guys weren't interested.' The second group are in their mid- to late-30s and desperate for a baby, perhaps a cute brown one. She saw many simply looking for love, and finally what she called the 'grandmother-type': white-haired, sixty-something women walking along the beach hand in hand with fit, handsome young men.

'After about five minutes on the beach, I felt like Naomi Campbell,' Gupta says. 'No matter what you look like or what size you are, they have the patter to make you feel as if you are a supermodel. You see women melting in front of these guys and I can completely understand why.'

Although the playwright is not critical of the women who engage in sex tourism, ultimately she found herself increasingly disheartened by what she saw.

'A lot of the women talked about how big the men are and how they can go all night. I was shocked at the way they objectified the black male body. But what I found most depressing was that the whole thing is not real. So many of the women think they have found real love. It's all very delusional. At first I thought it was all about white women exploiting black men. But it's not. It's very mutual. The guys are just as exploitative and you come away thinking this is such a sad, sick world that we live in.'

Steamy, raunchy and often very funny, Sugar Mummies is the first play to explore the issue since Shirley Valentine, which was made into a film. Bellingham plays Maggie, a habitual sex tourist in her 50s. Ultimately she is a broken, tragic woman who says: 'Marriage is a compromise... you have kids, you nurture them, teach them, love them. They grow up and leave you. And then your man leaves you too.' In a disturbing scene, she ties up her 17-year-old would-be lover, Antonio, after he fails to perform for her physically.

The play is tough on the sex tourists, says Gupta. 'But what I hoped to achieve was an exploration of why these women feel so invisible in the West that they feel they have to go and pay for affirmation. It uses humour because there is something highly amusing about the fact that there are fifty-something women who believe these beautiful 18-year-old men have fallen in love with them at first sight.'

Others see such deals as an inevitable function of the global distribution of wealth and even a sign of growing equality between the sexes. Jeannette Belliveau, 51, a former sex tourist who is now happily remarried, has just written a book, Romance on the Road, about the steady stream of lonely women heading from the West to developing countries.

Belliveau became an 'accidental sex pilgrim' after the break-up of her first marriage to a 'difficult, complex Englishman'. In the book she recounts a decade of flings, some lasting one night, others several years long, with men from the Caribbean, Brazil and Greece. She said that she wrote her book partly to counter the negative views put forward by the small number of academics who have studied the subject.

She also wanted to 'normalise' the experience, which she says for many British and American women creates unnecessary feelings of shame, anxiety and secrecy.

'There is the view that these women are guilty of hypocrisy and that they are exploiting poor men. This is nonsense. Sex between two adults that doesn't harm either partner is without question a good thing. I learnt so much from it. It healed me after a painful divorce.

'When I was younger I was so idealistic about sex, thinking it was best allied to love. But I learnt that this is not always the case and I began to realise that the notion of a perfect kindred spirit was for starry-eyed youth.'

She believes female sex tourism is increasing because of shortages of suitable men, the hassles of the dating game back home and due to many professional women living in sexual exile, with fragmented social connections.

'Back home in the West, many strong-minded, feisty women tend to intimidate guys - they focus on their careers and neglect their personal lives - but many black men seem to like and loudly express an appreciation for headstrong, independent, bantering and financially sound women. It does not take a great sex siren in these places to draw men like a magnet.'

She is critical of those who regard it as prostitution or a hangover from slavery. 'It seems to me that these critics are implicitly saying, oddly like members of the National Front, that women shouldn't date or fall in love outside their race, nationality or economic group. Casual travel sex by women, whether they are 20 or 60, is in everybody's best interests. I don't see it as exploitation. I see it as adults having fun.'

It is Friday night and the party is at Alfred's Ocean Palace, a grandly named beach bar in Negril. The sky is black and clear with just a light scattering of stars. In the unlit bar area people sip rum or Red Stripe beer and share joints. A live reggae band is on stage and the sandy dance floor is bustling with dreadlocks and dope smokers. Pale, plump, clumsy women do their best not to look ridiculous next to the raw, natural and explicit moves of the Jamaicans.

Two English women, both in their late 30s, have been coming here two to three times a year since 2002. They have each had several Jamaican lovers. For them, it is harmless fun, but they have seen another side to it.

'Our friend came with us last year and fell head over heels,' says Anna, a nurse from Essex, who is standing arm in arm with Rodney, a good-looking 19-year-old. 'We warned her that the guy was a hustler, but she didn't believe us and said we were just jealous. They slept together, and then he started asking for money. For nearly a year, she sent him cash for rent, for a passport, for everything. When she missed a month, he phoned asking where his money was. When she said she couldn't afford it, he told her she'd have to find herself another beach boy. She was heartbroken.'

Anna goes to the bar and I ask Rodney if he loves her. He smiles. 'I have a lot of special friends,' he says. He pulls out his wallet and shows me photographs of five women. His 'special friends' are from Britain, America and Germany, with two from Canada. I ask who his favourite is and why.

'Connie,' he says with a dreamy-eyed grin, pointing to a white-haired but attractive American woman in her early 50s. 'She's got a lot of money. She pays for me to go to college, and when I'm finished she's going to take me to live in America with her. That is what we all want. To live in America or Britain.'

Guardian Unlimited © Guardian Newspapers Limited 2006
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on August 07, 2006, 08:02:27 PM
Interesting.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: faith2005 on August 07, 2006, 08:03:41 PM
wow that article made me sad... :(
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Special Agent Dana Scully on August 07, 2006, 08:05:07 PM
Interesting.

interesting but not unknown to me...that lady was buggin though, dude is a prostitute and she's paying him for that ish.  she's in major denial.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on August 07, 2006, 08:10:51 PM
Interesting.

interesting but not unknown to me...that lady was buggin though, dude is a prostitute and she's paying him for that ish.  she's in major denial.

Yep, I kinda feel sorry for the ones who don't take it for what it is.  Ah well, live and learn, right?
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: One Step Ahead on August 07, 2006, 09:41:41 PM
puts How Stella Got her Groove Back in a whole new light  :-\
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: pikey on August 08, 2006, 05:52:44 AM
It's sad that all these women believe that its a true relationship.  It's one thing to have a vacation fling (though its closer to prostitution), but the women who are sending money back to the men are completely deluding themselves.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Burning Sands, Esq. on August 08, 2006, 06:24:48 AM
ABA: Women of color leaving big firms

By AUDREY McAVOY, Associated Press Writer
Sun Aug 6, 10:42 PM ET

An American Indian attorney is asked where she keeps her tomahawk.
White male partners look past a black lawyer, assuming she is clerical
staff. An Asian attorney is called a "dragon lady" when she asserts
herself.

A study by the American Bar Association that says those real-life
experiences, along with more subtle forms of discrimination, are
prompting growing numbers of minority women to abandon the nation's
biggest law firms.

"We're not even talking about trying to get up through a glass
ceiling; we're trying to stay above ground," said Paulette Brown,
co-chairwoman of the group that produced the study, released Friday
during the bar association's annual convention.

The report, "Visible Invisibility: Women of Color in Law Firms," was
conducted by the bar association with the help of the National Opinion
Research Center at the University of Chicago. Questionnaires were sent
to about 1,300 attorneys, both men and women, and responses came from
72 percent, or 920.

Law firms exclude minority women from golf outings, after-hours drinks
and other networking events, the study says. Partners neglect the
women of color they are supposed to help mentor.

In some cases, partners and senior lawyers disregard minority women
less because of outright bigotry than because they have less in common
with them and thus don't connect well with them, the study found.

Firms routinely hand minority women inferior assignments — such as
reviewing documents or writing briefs — that provide little
opportunity to meet clients, the study says. That means women of color
aren't able to cultivate business relationships and develop the
"billable hours" that are the basis of career advancement within a
firm.

Among the statistics in the study:

• Forty-four percent of women of color said they were denied desirable
assignments, versus 2 percent of white men.

• Forty-three percent of women of color said they had limited access
to client development opportunities, compared with 3 percent of white
men.

• Nearly two-thirds of women of color said they were excluded from
informal and formal networking opportunities, compared with 4 percent
of white men.

Such discrimination largely goes unchecked at law firms, forcing women
to quit if they want to avoid it, Brown said.

The study cited 2005 data from the National Association of Law
Placement showing 81 percent of minority female associates left their
jobs within five years of being hired. That figure was up from the
late 1990s, when it stood at 75 percent.

Elaine Johnson James, who is black and a partner at the firm Edwards,
Angell, Palmer and Dodge, said she has seen such defections.

She recently called classmates from her Harvard law class in an effort
to find black law partners to speak at an alumni panel. Of the 50 or
so black women in her class and in the classes above and below hers,
James said she found only one other than herself working at a firm.

"Harvard, now; you've got to figure if anybody's going to stick, it
would be us," James said. "It's amazing that we have left the private
practice of law in droves."

Michael Greco, the bar association president, said managing partners
at law firms — mostly white men — need to dedicate themselves to
reform.

"This is intolerable," Greco said at a news conference. "It stings the
conscience of our profession."

Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: crazy8 on August 08, 2006, 06:29:42 AM
Wow the observer article is crazy.  Of course this has been going on in Jamaica and other Caribbean islands for a long time, but it's still sad to read especially after my Jamaica Independce Day observance.  Shows how far Jamaica still has to go. :'(


Sands this article was posted already
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Burning Sands, Esq. on August 08, 2006, 07:37:58 AM
My bad. It would appear that I have been preempted.   :P
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: AshyLarry on August 08, 2006, 07:41:41 AM
http://msn.foxsports.com/nba/story/5852996?FSO1&ATT=HMA (http://msn.foxsports.com/nba/story/5852996?FSO1&ATT=HMA)

LOS ANGELES (AP) - The U.S. Department of Justice on Monday sued Los Angeles Clippers owner and real estate mogul Donald Sterling for housing discrimination, claiming he refused to rent apartments to blacks and families with children.

Federal prosecutors contend that Sterling, his wife, Rochelle, and their family trust refused to rent to many prospective tenants, treated them poorly and misrepresented the availability of apartments to them in the city's Koreatown section.
The defendants also are accused of refusing to rent to black prospective tenants in Beverly Hills as well as families with children looking to rent apartments that the defendants owned or managed in Los Angeles County.

"Here in Los Angeles, where housing is already at a premium, it is imperative that no one be denied housing simply because of their skin color, ethnic background or because they have children," said U.S. Attorney Debra Wong Yang.

A message left with attorney Michael Kennick, who has represented Sterling in previous lawsuits, was not immediately returned Monday.

Claiming violations of the federal Fair Housing Act, the lawsuit seeks an end to "discriminating on account of race, national origin and familial status," plus unspecified monetary damages and penalties. The lawsuit also names as defendants the Sterling Family Trust and the Korean Land Company, which owns multifamily rental properties throughout the county.

In November, a federal judge ordered Sterling to pay nearly $5 million in fees to plaintiffs' attorneys in a lawsuit accusing him of discriminating against black and Hispanic tenants.

The case - filed by attorneys including the nonprofit Housing Rights Center for 19 plaintiffs - resolved with a financial settlement that the judge described as "one of the largest ever obtained in this type of case," though the terms were not disclosed.

The 2003 lawsuit alleged that Sterling tried to drive out tenants, particularly blacks and Hispanics, at apartments he owned in Koreatown
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: pikey on August 08, 2006, 07:48:28 AM
Hmm, maybe I should start using my middle name when looking for housing...  :-\
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on August 08, 2006, 07:59:15 AM
Someone explain to me again what's wrong with discriminating against people with children.  I recall not liking that when we studied it in Property.  I wouldn't want kids running around screaming and disturbing my tenants.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: pikey on August 08, 2006, 08:03:29 AM
Someone explain to me again what's wrong with discriminating against people with children.  I recall not liking that when we studied it in Property.  I wouldn't want kids running around screaming and disturbing my tenants.

Because everyone would do it and then families would have nowhere to live.  Children are a necessary evil in the public realm.  Its in the public interest to support families, not to restrict their housing options.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on August 08, 2006, 08:08:01 AM
I don't think everyone would do it.  Families have money, and someone would cater to them.  Lots of places brand themselves as "kid-friendly."  For those of us who aren't, we should be able to discriminate!  I'm a law student.  I would pay a little extra for a guarantee not to be bothered by screaming kids (or stereos).
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: pikey on August 08, 2006, 08:25:43 AM
I don't think everyone would do it.  Families have money, and someone would cater to them.  Lots of places brand themselves as "kid-friendly."  For those of us who aren't, we should be able to discriminate!  I'm a law student.  I would pay a little extra for a guarantee not to be bothered by screaming kids (or stereos).

You almost have that guarantee if you live anywhere that is popular with students.  Families don't want to live where there are loud parties every other night and students drinking and partying.  There's nothing wrong with niche marketing (upscale, family friendly, student, etc), but everyone should have the right to live where they want (if they can afford it), even if it isn't marketing specifically to them.

Many people don't want to live next to black people.  Should they be allowed to rent solely to a certain demographic?
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: mivida2k on August 08, 2006, 10:12:12 AM
Someone explain to me again what's wrong with discriminating against people with children.  I recall not liking that when we studied it in Property.  I wouldn't want kids running around screaming and disturbing my tenants.


Because it is against the law.  If someone is allowed to discriminate against families with children than what's next...race, gender, national origin,
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: John Galt on August 08, 2006, 10:43:03 AM
Someone explain to me again what's wrong with discriminating against people with children.  I recall not liking that when we studied it in Property.  I wouldn't want kids running around screaming and disturbing my tenants.


Because it is against the law.  If someone is allowed to discriminate against families with children than what's next...race, gender, national origin,

I don't buy the slippery slope argument. For one, there's a practical reason for discriminating against persons with children as Alcibiades noted. We discriminate against persons over the age of 18 in terms of their ability to buy certain products that their older peers can. We segregate based on race in jails in order to make sure that violence is minimized. We segregate based on gender in bathrooms. We discriminate based on skin color the type of officers we put in certain communities to increase safety and connection with the people they protect.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Burning Sands, Esq. on August 08, 2006, 10:46:13 AM
Someone explain to me again what's wrong with discriminating against people with children.  I recall not liking that when we studied it in Property.  I wouldn't want kids running around screaming and disturbing my tenants.


Because it is against the law.  If someone is allowed to discriminate against families with children than what's next...race, gender, national origin,

Last time I checked, Race, Genger, National Origin, along with Religion, Age and Disability are federally protected classes, but having kids isn't.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: pikey on August 08, 2006, 10:49:05 AM
Someone explain to me again what's wrong with discriminating against people with children.  I recall not liking that when we studied it in Property.  I wouldn't want kids running around screaming and disturbing my tenants.


Because it is against the law.  If someone is allowed to discriminate against families with children than what's next...race, gender, national origin,

I don't buy the slippery slope argument. For one, there's a practical reason for discriminating against persons with children as Alcibiades noted. We discriminate against persons over the age of 18 in terms of their ability to buy certain products that their older peers can. We segregate based on race in jails in order to make sure that violence is minimized. We segregate based on gender in bathrooms. We discriminate based on skin color the type of officers we put in certain communities to increase safety and connection with the people they protect.

But that disregards the public interest.  Thre's a public interest to limit the sale of certain products to people of certain ages.  There's a public safety interest to have seperate bathrooms.  And there's definitely a public interest in ensuring that families have affordable housing.  Restricting families to certain locations will increase the cost of housing (basic supply and demand).  Families will usually self-select communities/apartments with other families, but they should still retain the right to live where they want.  When balancing the public interest, your interest in quiet doesn't cut it.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: mivida2k on August 08, 2006, 10:52:29 AM
Someone explain to me again what's wrong with discriminating against people with children.  I recall not liking that when we studied it in Property.  I wouldn't want kids running around screaming and disturbing my tenants.


Because it is against the law.  If someone is allowed to discriminate against families with children than what's next...race, gender, national origin,

Last time I checked, Race, Genger, National Origin, along with Religion, Age and Disability are federally protected classes, but having kids isn't.


Always quick to criticize:

"(k) "Familial status" means one or more individuals (who have not attained the age of 18 years) being domiciled with--


(1) a parent or another person having legal custody of such individual or individuals; or
(2) the designee of such parent or other person having such custody, with the written permission of such parent or other person.


The protections afforded against discrimination on the basis of familial status shall apply to any person who is pregnant or is in the process of securing legal custody of any individual who has not attained the age of 18 years."


http://www.usdoj.gov/crt/housing/fairhousing/about_fairhousingact.htm

Oh and I used to be a fair housing investigator.  HUD gotta love them and DOJ gotta love filing those HUD complaints. 
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: One Step Ahead on August 08, 2006, 10:54:57 AM
hmm not sure where I stand cause there be some bebes' kids that ruin it for the rest of the families, but I think we should realize who stands to suffer the most from allowing landlords to discriminate against families--black and brown people.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: John Galt on August 08, 2006, 11:19:04 AM
Someone explain to me again what's wrong with discriminating against people with children.  I recall not liking that when we studied it in Property.  I wouldn't want kids running around screaming and disturbing my tenants.


Because it is against the law.  If someone is allowed to discriminate against families with children than what's next...race, gender, national origin,

I don't buy the slippery slope argument. For one, there's a practical reason for discriminating against persons with children as Alcibiades noted. We discriminate against persons over the age of 18 in terms of their ability to buy certain products that their older peers can. We segregate based on race in jails in order to make sure that violence is minimized. We segregate based on gender in bathrooms. We discriminate based on skin color the type of officers we put in certain communities to increase safety and connection with the people they protect.

But that disregards the public interest.  Thre's a public interest to limit the sale of certain products to people of certain ages.  There's a public safety interest to have seperate bathrooms.  And there's definitely a public interest in ensuring that families have affordable housing.  Restricting families to certain locations will increase the cost of housing (basic supply and demand).  Families will usually self-select communities/apartments with other families, but they should still retain the right to live where they want.  When balancing the public interest, your interest in quiet doesn't cut it.

Well i was only responding to mivida regarding the slippery slope and using alci's hypothetical as support. Using his hypothetical, it is definitely in the public interest that students have housing options that restrict unneccessary and excessive noise and disturbances.

I also don't buy your supply and demand argument.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on August 08, 2006, 11:32:41 AM
Someone explain to me again what's wrong with discriminating against people with children.  I recall not liking that when we studied it in Property.  I wouldn't want kids running around screaming and disturbing my tenants.


Because it is against the law.  If someone is allowed to discriminate against families with children than what's next...race, gender, national origin,

I don't buy the slippery slope argument. For one, there's a practical reason for discriminating against persons with children as Alcibiades noted. We discriminate against persons over the age of 18 in terms of their ability to buy certain products that their older peers can. We segregate based on race in jails in order to make sure that violence is minimized. We segregate based on gender in bathrooms. We discriminate based on skin color the type of officers we put in certain communities to increase safety and connection with the people they protect.

But that disregards the public interest.  Thre's a public interest to limit the sale of certain products to people of certain ages.  There's a public safety interest to have seperate bathrooms.  And there's definitely a public interest in ensuring that families have affordable housing.  Restricting families to certain locations will increase the cost of housing (basic supply and demand).  Families will usually self-select communities/apartments with other families, but they should still retain the right to live where they want.  When balancing the public interest, your interest in quiet doesn't cut it.

Well i was only responding to mivida regarding the slippery slope and using alci's hypothetical as support. Using his hypothetical, it is definitely in the public interest that students have housing options that restrict unneccessary and excessive noise and disturbances.

I also don't buy your supply and demand argument.

Agreed.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: pikey on August 08, 2006, 11:39:41 AM
Someone explain to me again what's wrong with discriminating against people with children.  I recall not liking that when we studied it in Property.  I wouldn't want kids running around screaming and disturbing my tenants.


Because it is against the law.  If someone is allowed to discriminate against families with children than what's next...race, gender, national origin,

I don't buy the slippery slope argument. For one, there's a practical reason for discriminating against persons with children as Alcibiades noted. We discriminate against persons over the age of 18 in terms of their ability to buy certain products that their older peers can. We segregate based on race in jails in order to make sure that violence is minimized. We segregate based on gender in bathrooms. We discriminate based on skin color the type of officers we put in certain communities to increase safety and connection with the people they protect.

But that disregards the public interest.  Thre's a public interest to limit the sale of certain products to people of certain ages.  There's a public safety interest to have seperate bathrooms.  And there's definitely a public interest in ensuring that families have affordable housing.  Restricting families to certain locations will increase the cost of housing (basic supply and demand).  Families will usually self-select communities/apartments with other families, but they should still retain the right to live where they want.  When balancing the public interest, your interest in quiet doesn't cut it.

Well i was only responding to mivida regarding the slippery slope and using alci's hypothetical as support. Using his hypothetical, it is definitely in the public interest that students have housing options that restrict unneccessary and excessive noise and disturbances.

I also don't buy your supply and demand argument.

For public interest, students have other places to study (library, school, etc) and live (dorms).  In fact, they're usually the nuisance with loud parties, etc.  Nobody is forcing a student to live in a certain housing complex.  If they don't like it they can move back to campus.  Nevermind the fact that most families don't want to live with students.

As for supply and demand, that is part of the reason why the law was affected in the first place, and why rent controls can do more harm than good.  The supply of housing is fixed in the short term (it takes a while to build more).  If the supply of housing available to a certain demographic decreases and the demand stays the same, then housing costs will increase.  It happened in the 50's and 60's when black professionals were paying more money for crappy housing because they had no choice.  In the short term families will pay more for housing, because landlords offering family housing will know that they can charge more.  The long term result is that demand will decrease as families move out of the area (see NYC, to a certain extent).  Most people realise that it is in the public interest to have families in communities, therefore they do not want this to happen.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: faith2005 on August 08, 2006, 11:48:06 AM
you guys are showing your evil side again. like alci and others who were mad that someone with a kid is on an airplane. families are in. misanthropes are out.

seriously, i think this guy discriminating was doing it in a systematic way like offering the aprtment to some and not to others. if you set up your apartment so that it is mostly 1 bedrooms in the downtown area i don't think there is a problem with natural selection, i.e. families won't move there. or if your aprtmment just lists that it is an older person living facility or whatever. thats totally fine. however, if someone calls and says that they have apartments then when you get there changes his story i don't see how that can be defended in anyway.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: pikey on August 08, 2006, 11:49:52 AM
you guys are showing your evil side again. like alci and others who were mad that someone with a kid is on an airplane. families are in. misanthropes are out.

seriously, i think this guy discriminating was doing it in a systematic way like offering the aprtment to some and not to others. if you set up your apartment so that it is mostly 1 bedrooms in the downtown area i don't think there is a problem with natural selection, i.e. families won't move there. or if your aprtmment just lists that it is an older person living facility or whatever. thats totally fine. however, if someone calls and says that they have apartments then when you get there changes his story i don't see how that can be defended in anyway.

Agreed.  You have the right to make your apt building all luxury studios but if you put i 2 bedrooms, you cannot control if the tenant is a single person, two college students, or a couple with a kid.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Burning Sands, Esq. on August 08, 2006, 11:59:52 AM
Someone explain to me again what's wrong with discriminating against people with children.  I recall not liking that when we studied it in Property.  I wouldn't want kids running around screaming and disturbing my tenants.


Because it is against the law.  If someone is allowed to discriminate against families with children than what's next...race, gender, national origin,

Last time I checked, Race, Genger, National Origin, along with Religion, Age and Disability are federally protected classes, but having kids isn't.


Always quick to criticize:

"(k) "Familial status" means one or more individuals (who have not attained the age of 18 years) being domiciled with--


(1) a parent or another person having legal custody of such individual or individuals; or
(2) the designee of such parent or other person having such custody, with the written permission of such parent or other person.


The protections afforded against discrimination on the basis of familial status shall apply to any person who is pregnant or is in the process of securing legal custody of any individual who has not attained the age of 18 years."


http://www.usdoj.gov/crt/housing/fairhousing/about_fairhousingact.htm

Oh and I used to be a fair housing investigator.  HUD gotta love them and DOJ gotta love filing those HUD complaints. 


Within the context of Fair Housing you are correct. That's what I get for coming in late.

Howver, in general, having kids is still not a protected class though.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: mivida2k on August 08, 2006, 12:02:55 PM
Someone explain to me again what's wrong with discriminating against people with children.  I recall not liking that when we studied it in Property.  I wouldn't want kids running around screaming and disturbing my tenants.


Because it is against the law.  If someone is allowed to discriminate against families with children than what's next...race, gender, national origin,

Last time I checked, Race, Genger, National Origin, along with Religion, Age and Disability are federally protected classes, but having kids isn't.


Always quick to criticize:

"(k) "Familial status" means one or more individuals (who have not attained the age of 18 years) being domiciled with--


(1) a parent or another person having legal custody of such individual or individuals; or
(2) the designee of such parent or other person having such custody, with the written permission of such parent or other person.


The protections afforded against discrimination on the basis of familial status shall apply to any person who is pregnant or is in the process of securing legal custody of any individual who has not attained the age of 18 years."


http://www.usdoj.gov/crt/housing/fairhousing/about_fairhousingact.htm

Oh and I used to be a fair housing investigator.  HUD gotta love them and DOJ gotta love filing those HUD complaints. 


Within the context of Fair Housing you are correct. That's what I get for coming in late.

Howver, in general, having kids is still not a protected class though.

I know I am correct. ;)  We were/are discussing fair housing only.

I used to teach this mess.   ;D  And know when familial status is applicable. 

Carry on.... 8)
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on August 08, 2006, 12:12:50 PM
Lol.  I'm not a misanthrope...just a misscreamingchildrope.  I guess I'll just have to have some famous person paint scary pictures along the base of my walls and make my electrical outlets look like lollipops.  Works of art/child repellants :D. j/k, screaming-child lovers, j/k
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: mivida2k on August 08, 2006, 12:14:39 PM
I am going to report you to child services.... :D

Do you have a gingerbread house?
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: pikey on August 08, 2006, 12:27:00 PM
Lol.  I'm not a misanthrope...just a misscreamingchildrope.  I guess I'll just have to have some famous person paint scary pictures along the base of my walls and make my electrical outlets look like lollipops.  Works of art/child repellants :D. j/k, screaming-child lovers, j/k

Lol, its not a matter of loving screaming children (I don't), it's the law. :o I too would prefer to live in child free oblivion (and dog-free, the barking can be waaaay worse than screaming), but I recognise the need for the little buggers.  I do like the idea of a dog free apt complex.  ;)
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Burning Sands, Esq. on August 08, 2006, 12:27:42 PM
Someone explain to me again what's wrong with discriminating against people with children.  I recall not liking that when we studied it in Property.  I wouldn't want kids running around screaming and disturbing my tenants.


Because it is against the law.  If someone is allowed to discriminate against families with children than what's next...race, gender, national origin,

Last time I checked, Race, Genger, National Origin, along with Religion, Age and Disability are federally protected classes, but having kids isn't.


Always quick to criticize:

"(k) "Familial status" means one or more individuals (who have not attained the age of 18 years) being domiciled with--


(1) a parent or another person having legal custody of such individual or individuals; or
(2) the designee of such parent or other person having such custody, with the written permission of such parent or other person.


The protections afforded against discrimination on the basis of familial status shall apply to any person who is pregnant or is in the process of securing legal custody of any individual who has not attained the age of 18 years."


http://www.usdoj.gov/crt/housing/fairhousing/about_fairhousingact.htm

Oh and I used to be a fair housing investigator.  HUD gotta love them and DOJ gotta love filing those HUD complaints. 


Within the context of Fair Housing you are correct. That's what I get for coming in late.

Howver, in general, having kids is still not a protected class though.

I know I am correct. ;)  We were/are discussing fair housing only.

I used to teach this mess.   ;D  And know when familial status is applicable. 

Carry on.... 8)

May I pop your collar, madame?  It sounds like it is in need.

Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: mivida2k on August 08, 2006, 12:28:59 PM
Someone explain to me again what's wrong with discriminating against people with children.  I recall not liking that when we studied it in Property.  I wouldn't want kids running around screaming and disturbing my tenants.


Because it is against the law.  If someone is allowed to discriminate against families with children than what's next...race, gender, national origin,

Last time I checked, Race, Genger, National Origin, along with Religion, Age and Disability are federally protected classes, but having kids isn't.


Always quick to criticize:

"(k) "Familial status" means one or more individuals (who have not attained the age of 18 years) being domiciled with--


(1) a parent or another person having legal custody of such individual or individuals; or
(2) the designee of such parent or other person having such custody, with the written permission of such parent or other person.


The protections afforded against discrimination on the basis of familial status shall apply to any person who is pregnant or is in the process of securing legal custody of any individual who has not attained the age of 18 years."


http://www.usdoj.gov/crt/housing/fairhousing/about_fairhousingact.htm

Oh and I used to be a fair housing investigator.  HUD gotta love them and DOJ gotta love filing those HUD complaints. 


Within the context of Fair Housing you are correct. That's what I get for coming in late.

Howver, in general, having kids is still not a protected class though.

I know I am correct. ;)  We were/are discussing fair housing only.

I used to teach this mess.   ;D  And know when familial status is applicable. 

Carry on.... 8)

May I pop your collar, madame?  It sounds like it is in need.

As long as I get to pop yours.  It has been in need for a long time.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on August 08, 2006, 12:35:40 PM
it's the law. :o

Lol.  That's meaningless.  Don't you read about those people who make the laws?  They're hardly what I would call all-knowing (see Cynthia McKinney).  That's why lawyering is so fun...you get to argue about what a law "means."
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Inquirer on August 08, 2006, 12:37:37 PM
Agreed.  You have the right to make your apt building all luxury studios but if you put i 2 bedrooms, you cannot control if the tenant is a single person, two college students, or a couple with a kid.

Actually, you can (sorta). In some states, there are laws against how many people can live in a certain type of dwelling. For instance, in Maryland, I think the limit of occupants on a space with two bedrooms is four people.  I used to live upstairs from an evil wench who had five awful children (they were a major factor in my deciding to buy a house) and I was informed that they were in violation when I called the housing department on them.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: faith2005 on August 08, 2006, 12:45:10 PM
not to be nitpicky but thats what moni was saying that if you have a place with 2 berooms you can't discriminate between renters according to what configuration that number is in--two couples, a couple with a kid, two college students or one person alone. as opposed to a building with all studios which would inherently have a lower (occupant) limit that would preclude most families.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: pikey on August 08, 2006, 12:50:41 PM
not to be nitpicky but thats what moni was saying that if you have a place with 2 berooms you can't discriminate between renters according to what configuration that number is in--two couples, a couple with a kid, two college students or one person alone. as opposed to a building with all studios which would inherently have a lower (occupant) limit that would preclude most families.

Faith pretty much said it for me.  You can limit the number of people for health and safety reasons, but you cannot restrict who the individual people are, except in certain situations.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Inquirer on August 08, 2006, 12:56:04 PM
Faith pretty much said it for me.  You can limit the number of people for health and safety reasons, but you cannot restrict who the individual people are, except in certain situations.

My reading comprehension skills are clearly sub-standard these days. Thanks for the clarification ladies :)
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: mivida2k on August 08, 2006, 12:58:34 PM
not to be nitpicky but thats what moni was saying that if you have a place with 2 berooms you can't discriminate between renters according to what configuration that number is in--two couples, a couple with a kid, two college students or one person alone. as opposed to a building with all studios which would inherently have a lower (occupant) limit that would preclude most families.


Correct.  

it's the law. :o

Lol.  That's meaningless.  Don't you read about those people who make the laws?  They're hardly what I would call all-knowing (see Cynthia McKinney).  That's why lawyering is so fun...you get to argue about what a law "means."

 :D  That is so true that it is sad.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Inquirer on August 08, 2006, 01:03:43 PM
Bengals Set Up 'Jerk' Hotline for Fans
Team Hopes to Counter Bad Behavior With Penalties
AP
CINCINNATI (Aug. 8th) - Cincinnati Bengals  fans annoyed by bad behavior in the stands can now report it by cell phone. The hot line number should be easy to remember - (513) 381-JERK.


Who's a Jerk?
 
Mike Simons, US PRESSWIRE / ZUMA Press
If Bengals fans go over the line with inappropriate behavior this coming season, they face action from their fellow supporters. Consequences for bad behavior range from a verbal warning to arrest.


Fans using too much foul language will get a warning from stadium security. Those who continue could be ejected and have their season tickets and personal seat licenses taken away. More serious offenses could lead to arrest.


The team doesn't want to become the "curse police," but expects fans to behave themselves, said Bob Bedinghaus, the Bengals' director of development for Paul Brown Stadium.


"You need to understand you're coming to an NFL football game," Bedinghaus said. "On the other hand, we want to make sure that we're paying attention to those folks who are going over the line."

 When callers report problems such as threats, fights or drunkenness, security officials will use the stadium's video cameras to focus on the offenders and then respond.


Fans have complained to team officials that beer is increasing the problem with misbehavior in the stands.


"They were complaints (of) excessive drunkenness. People that were kind of falling down drunk," Bedinghaus said. "And there were some fights last year. Whenever you put 65,000 people together, you're always going to have some fights. But there were a few more than normal."


Jeanie Dittrich of West Chester, a season ticket holder, said she was offended by drunken fans when she took her 12-year-old son, Austin, to a playoff game against the Pittsburgh Steelers . A woman kept spilling beer on her, and a man next to her son was swearing and helped start a fight.


"We told him beforehand, 'You might see some drunk people, you might hear some ... swearing.' But at the game, I thought, 'Oh, my gosh, I'm going to mar my son for the rest of his life by having him come to this game,"' she said.

Season ticket holders will be notified about the hot line this week, as well as the consequences of bad behavior. The team will show a video promoting the hot line at home games.


Bedinghaus said the Bengals do expect some prank calls.

"If you get 6,000 people calling this line - 'Hey, (Steelers quarterback) Ben Roethlisberger  is a jerk' - then it becomes less effective," he said. "The thing to remember is we have caller ID on this line."

Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: faith2005 on August 08, 2006, 01:23:33 PM
LMAO! these people have obviously never been in the Dawg Pound. HAHAHAHA! She didn't know people would be cursing excessively and drinking heavily? :D this guy has this whole thing about cleveland on his facebook page. one of the lines is like, "we're the reason why there are plastic bottles at football stadiums." LOL! The Bengals fans must be whack.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on August 09, 2006, 06:33:31 AM
Lawyers in Murder Appeal Use Cigarette-Break Defense
By CHRISTOPHER MAAG
COLUMBUS, Ohio, Aug. 8 — Lawyers for a man convicted of beating a former girlfriend to death with a lead pipe argued before the Ohio Supreme Court on Tuesday that their client should be spared the death penalty, partly because jurors were not allowed to smoke while deliberating.

“A capital trial is supposed to be a considered process,” said Keith A. Yeazel, one of the lawyers. “Jurors shouldn’t be trying to speed up the process so they can go outside and smoke a Kool cigarette.”

The defendant, Phillip E. Elmore, 43, admitted his guilt during his trial in October 2003. While on the stand, Mr. Elmore said, “I feel I deserve the worst punishment that there is,” according to the court transcript.

But in an hourlong hearing here, lawyers representing Mr. Elmore in the appeals process argued that his trial lawyers had failed to provide an adequate defense that might have spared his life.

They also noted that the trial lawyers had not objected when Judge Jon R. Spahr of the Licking County Common Pleas Court rejected jurors’ request for cigarette breaks while they were deliberating. This amounted to discrimination against smokers, Joseph Edwards, another of the lawyers, said Tuesday, and created a reason for jurors to rush through the most important phase of the trial.

The jurors had had to decide whether Mr. Elmore was guilty of aggravated murder and, in a second phase of deliberations, whether he deserved the death penalty or life in prison.

The justices appeared unimpressed with the lawyers’ argument.

“You’re saying that because the trial judge didn’t allow them to smoke that smokers are being discriminated against?” Justice Maureen O’Connor said. “Are you proposing a new right for an entire class of people?”

Before the hearing, Mr. Elmore’s lawyers acknowledged that the tactic was unusual and unlikely to succeed.

“We don’t believe this is the best issue in the case,” Mr. Yeazel said. “But if we don’t raise it on direct appeal, we’ll never be able to talk about it if it becomes an issue in federal court.”

Mr. Edwards said that Mr. Elmore’s father had beat Mr. Elmore and sexually abused his sister. Mr. Elmore was in and out of jail for various offenses from ages 20 to 38, Mr. Yeazel said, including a stint at the Licking County Jail, where his girlfriend, Pamela Annarino, worked as a sheriff’s deputy.

On June 1, 2002, Mr. Elmore broke into Ms. Annarino’s house while she was away, according to the case transcript. He was upset because she had ended their relationship, he said at trial. Ms. Annarino returned home to find Mr. Elmore waiting with a loaded shotgun, the transcript says.

He then choked her and struck her four times in the head with a pipe, according to his confession, which was entered as evidence.

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/08/09/us/09ohio.html
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: AshyLarry on August 09, 2006, 06:51:34 AM
http://msn.foxsports.com/cfb/story/5858558?FSO1&ATT=HMA (http://msn.foxsports.com/cfb/story/5858558?FSO1&ATT=HMA)

My question is where the hell was he going with 4 guns and a bullet proof vest on. He really messed up after the NC game in 2002.
 
 COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) - Maurice Clarett was arrested early Wednesday after a highway chase that ended with police using Mace on the former Ohio State running back and finding four loaded guns in his truck, a police spokesman said.

Officers used Mace to subdue Clarett after a stun gun was ineffective because the former Fiesta Bowl star was wearing a bullet-resistant vest, Sgt. Michael Woods said.
"It took several officers to get him handcuffed," Woods said. "Even after he was placed in the paddy wagon, he was still kicking at the doors and being a problem for the officers."

Clarett was taken to police headquarters to be interviewed. Police planned to charge him with carrying concealed weapons and other counts, Woods said.

Clarett made an illegal U-turn on the city's east side and failed to stop when officers, in a cruiser with lights flashing, tried to pull him over, Woods said.

Police were pursuing Clarett on eastbound Interstate 70 when he darted across the median and began heading west. Clarett drove over a spike strip that was placed on the highway, flattening the driver's side tires of the SUV, Woods said.

Clarett exited the highway and pulled into a restaurant parking lot, where officers removed him from the SUV after he failed to obey numerous orders to exit the vehicle, Woods said.

After Clarett was placed in a police van, officers discovered a loaded rifle and three loaded handguns in the front of the vehicle, Woods said.

Woods said he did not know where Clarett got the guns or why he had them, and that federal authorities plan to trace their ownership.

Clarett, 22, is currently awaiting trial on two counts of aggravated robbery, four counts of robbery and one count of carrying a concealed weapon in a separate case. Authorities said he was identified by witnesses as the person who flashed a gun and robbed two people in an alley behind the Opium Lounge in the early hours of Jan. 1.

Messages seeking comment were left Wednesday morning for Clarett's attorneys in that case, Nick Mango and Michael Hoague.

Clarett scored the winning touchdown in the second overtime to lead Ohio State to the 2002 national championship, the school's first since 1968. But that was the last game the freshman played for Ohio State. He sat out the 2003 season after being charged with misdemeanor falsification on a police report, then dropped out of school. He sued to be included in the 2004 NFL draft and lost in court.

A surprise third-round pick in the 2005 draft, he was cut by the Denver Broncos during the preseason.

 
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Inquirer on August 09, 2006, 10:52:09 AM
MTV Draws Fire for Cartoon of Black Women on Leash
By Steve Gorman
Reuters
LOS ANGELES (Aug. 9) - A new MTV cartoon depicting black women squatting on all fours tethered to leashes and defecating on the floor is drawing fire from several prominent African Americans who call the episode degrading.

Critics say MTV showed especially poor judgment because the weekly animated program, "Where My Dogs At?", appeals to young teens and airs at an hour, 12:30 p.m. on Saturdays, when many children are watching television.

The show just completed its initial eight-episode run on MTV2, a spinoff channel of the music video institution that recently celebrated its 25th anniversary.

The half-hour show lampoons real-life celebrities and pop culture as seen through the eyes of two wise-cracking stray dogs -- Woofie and Buddy -- voiced by comedians Tracy Morgan and Jeffrey Ross, respectively.

A statement released this week by the Viacom Inc.-owned cable network, whose president, Christina Norman, is black, defended the episode in question as social satire.

In it, a look-alike of rap star Snoop Dogg  strolls into a pet shop with two bikini-clad black women on leashes. They hunch over on all fours and scratch themselves as he orders one of them to "hand me my latte." At the end of the segment, the Snoopathon Dogg Esquire character dons a rubber glove to clean up excrement left on the floor by one of the women.

MTV said the "Woofie Loves Snoop" episode, which first aired on July 1, was "in fact a parody of an actual appearance Snoop Dogg  made where he was accompanied by two women wearing neck collars and chains."

"We certainly do not condone Snoop's actions and the goal was to take aim at that incident for its insensitivity and outrageousness," the statement said.

But several prominent blacks, including New York Daily News columnist Stanley Crouch, condemned the segment as misogynist, racist and crude, and they questioned the sincerity of MTV's contention that it was satirizing the outlandish behavior of a real-life rapper.

"Where's the context in that?" said Lisa Fager, president and co-founder of the Industry Ears, a consortium of broadcast industry professionals who monitor and critique media content.

Representatives for Snoop Dogg , who had no involvement in the show, were not immediately available for comment.

Crouch suggested in a column this week that the "Where My Dogs At?" segment was an extension of dehumanizing images contained in gangsta rap videos aired by MTV and projected "around the world as 'real' black culture."

Payne Brown, a high-ranking executive at cable giant Comcast Corp., said he lodged a personal complaint in an e-mail to Norman but found her response, essentially the same as the network's press statement, to be "unsatisfying."

The first season of the show, which carries a rating advising that parents may find its material unsuitable for children under age 14, drew a cumulative audience of 17.2 million viewers, according to Nielsen Media Research.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: pikey on August 09, 2006, 10:57:14 AM
MTV Draws Fire for Cartoon of Black Women on Leash
By Steve Gorman
Reuters
LOS ANGELES (Aug. 9) - A new MTV cartoon depicting black women squatting on all fours tethered to leashes and defecating on the floor is drawing fire from several prominent African Americans who call the episode degrading.

Critics say MTV showed especially poor judgment because the weekly animated program, "Where My Dogs At?", appeals to young teens and airs at an hour, 12:30 p.m. on Saturdays, when many children are watching television.

The show just completed its initial eight-episode run on MTV2, a spinoff channel of the music video institution that recently celebrated its 25th anniversary.

The half-hour show lampoons real-life celebrities and pop culture as seen through the eyes of two wise-cracking stray dogs -- Woofie and Buddy -- voiced by comedians Tracy Morgan and Jeffrey Ross, respectively.

A statement released this week by the Viacom Inc.-owned cable network, whose president, Christina Norman, is black, defended the episode in question as social satire.

In it, a look-alike of rap star Snoop Dogg  strolls into a pet shop with two bikini-clad black women on leashes. They hunch over on all fours and scratch themselves as he orders one of them to "hand me my latte." At the end of the segment, the Snoopathon Dogg Esquire character dons a rubber glove to clean up excrement left on the floor by one of the women.

MTV said the "Woofie Loves Snoop" episode, which first aired on July 1, was "in fact a parody of an actual appearance Snoop Dogg  made where he was accompanied by two women wearing neck collars and chains."

"We certainly do not condone Snoop's actions and the goal was to take aim at that incident for its insensitivity and outrageousness," the statement said.

But several prominent blacks, including New York Daily News columnist Stanley Crouch, condemned the segment as misogynist, racist and crude, and they questioned the sincerity of MTV's contention that it was satirizing the outlandish behavior of a real-life rapper.

"Where's the context in that?" said Lisa Fager, president and co-founder of the Industry Ears, a consortium of broadcast industry professionals who monitor and critique media content.

Representatives for Snoop Dogg , who had no involvement in the show, were not immediately available for comment.

Crouch suggested in a column this week that the "Where My Dogs At?" segment was an extension of dehumanizing images contained in gangsta rap videos aired by MTV and projected "around the world as 'real' black culture."

Payne Brown, a high-ranking executive at cable giant Comcast Corp., said he lodged a personal complaint in an e-mail to Norman but found her response, essentially the same as the network's press statement, to be "unsatisfying."

The first season of the show, which carries a rating advising that parents may find its material unsuitable for children under age 14, drew a cumulative audience of 17.2 million viewers, according to Nielsen Media Research.

Why is it that people seem to think that just because somebody is black, that makes it ok to promote offensive and racially questionable (if not downright racist) content.  That hurts my heart, that black people fight so hard to make it to the top, only to promote the same negativity that we should be trying to combat.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: faith2005 on August 09, 2006, 01:58:52 PM
I thought this was interesting. Did most folks on the board grow in single-parent homes? I understand some of the opposition to marriage, but I can't help but think if I grew up in a single-parent home I would be more inclined to want to get married b/c I wouldn't want to have to do it all on my own--which is what my friends who are single moms, or grew up with single moms seem to have to do. thoughts?

Younger blacks absorb a wariness of marriage
By Vanessa E. Jones, Globe Staff  |  August 9, 2006

As African-American teenagers in a Mission Hill conference room talk about their opinions of marriage , their comments reveal a dreary view of the institution.

``I'm not looking forward to marriage," says Nakeeda Burns , a 17-year-old resident of Revere and daughter of a single mother, ``and I don't think we [people in general] should be married, because I see how other marriages ended up in my family and on television. It's always a disaster."

Even the married couples these teens know don't seem particularly happy.

``All of my friends who are married, they tell me not to get married," says Anderson Felix , 17, of Dorchester. `` `Wifey is going to keep you on lock.' `Everywhere you go, she'll call you every five minutes.' I won't be able to deal with that."

Anita Marshall blurts out, ``I want a big wedding if I get married," but she doesn't think she'll make it to the altar. Her mother, grandmother, and great-grandmother were married; now they're all divorced.

``I don't know anyone who's married, or anybody who is married and stayed married," says Marshall, a 15-year-old from Dorchester. She and the other 10 teens in the room are participants in the organization YPACT (Youth for Prevention, Action and Change Through Thought ), which aims to develop community leaders by teaching teens about social, racial, and health disparities in their neighborhoods.

``When I think of `married,' " Marshall adds, ``[I think] `divorce' -- first word."

Their disillusionment mirrors a growing resistance to marriage among African-Americans. In the post-Civil War era, when African-Americans had the option to marry legally for the first time, many did. The 1890 Census showed that 80 percent of African-American families were headed by two parents, according to Andrew Billingsley 's 1992 book, ``Climbing Jacob's Ladder: The Enduring Legacies of African-American Families ."

But in 1970, census figures show ed that only 57 percent of black men and 54 percent of black women were married. By last year those numbers had slipped to 42 percent for men and 35 percent for women. In comparison, 68 percent of white men and 63 percent of white women were married in 1970, vs. 59 percent of men and 57 percent of women in 2005 .

As the local teens's comments indicate, view s about marriage are formed by what people see in their lives -- and in pop culture. Shows such as ``Divorce Court " and the media's focus on the latest celebrity break-up do not paint glowing pictures of relationships. These factors may help explain why the US divorce rate approaches 40 percent.

``Today . . . not just in the African-American community but in the larger community, divorce is rampant, there's a proliferation of single- mother households, and there's a generation of kids coming up who are very skeptical of marriage," says Dr. William July , a psychologist who has written several books about relationships, including ``Understanding the Tin Man: Why So Many Men Avoid Intimacy ."

But while whites tend to remarry, blacks are less likely to do so. A 2002 report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that the probability of remarriage was highest among divorced white women and lowest among divorced black women.

Orlando Patterson , a professor of sociology at Harvard University, believes that African-Americans' views of marriage reflect the lingering effects of slavery. The system emasculated black men, who had no real power over themselves, the women they loved, or their children, who could be sold, raped, or violently beaten. It upended the traditional male and female roles in a family unit. The idea that this history could result in a stable, two-parent lifestyle for African-Americans today ``is utterly absurd," says Patterson, who explored the subject in his 1998 book, ``Rituals of Blood: Consequences of Slavery in Two American Centuries ."

Patterson says this history lingers in the way black men and women interact. Once slavery ended, a tussle for power developed between the sexes, creating a tension that exists to this day, he says. And as some women became economically independent in the 1960s, they happily chucked those harried marital relationships.

In the decades that followed, single people retained interest in marriage until they reached middle age, according to Patterson. Now, he says that fear of -- or lack of interest in -- commitment is trickling down to a younger generation.

``Women in the black community would take a shine to marriage, and if they didn't find someone appropriate by the time they were in their early 30s, they're down on marriage," Patterson says. ``What's happening is the skepticism is starting earlier."


Grappling with roles
That skepticism can be heard in the voices of the YPACT teens. As they talk, they reveal some of the stereotypical ideas about male and female roles they hear from the adults who surround them: Women take care of the home, cook and clean; men go out with friends and provide monetary support.

Marshall blames a male desire to dominate women after marriage on the vows exchanged during the wedding ceremony. ``It's the language," she says. ``It's like, `OK, I'm yours, and you're mine. So you have to do this. You have to do that.' It's like ownership. They feel like they own you."

William Glass , 16, who lives in Mattapan, thinks a re-evaluation of power takes place after the wedding ceremony. ``When you get married there's a part where it says, `honor and obey ' -- that's the part where everybody gets big- headed at. `Honor and obey, huh? Obey me! Fix my plate.' "

The problems often develop as men and women grapple over their roles in the marriage -- an issue that is exacerbated in the Africa-American community because of slavery's legacy, says Patterson. ``There's some profound differences in what the appropriate sex roles should be . . . African-American women have a modern independent view about women's roles. African-American men -- it's a mix. In some respects, they have a modern view of what women should be: that women should work. But there's still some male- dominance views that they have that irk black women tremendously and create real friction in the relationships."

These teens seem to have responded to those tensions by developing an early fear of commitment.

Burns says, ``I get tired of people very quickly, so I don't think I'll end up getting married."

Kemar Henry sounds as if he has already written marriage off, and he's only 14. He fears that getting married would cause him to lose his independence.

``When you have made a commitment," says Henry, who lives in Mattapan, ``and then there's money [involved] and you want to [leave], they have something to hold you."

And what kind of hold do they have?

``The ring," says Kemar, holding up his ring finger, then beginning to whine as if in an argument: ``` You made this promise.' A lot of drama. But when you're not married, you can say, `I'm sick of this' and walk out."

Henry and Burns admit they've come to some of their conclusions about marriage from watching television. Both spent the previous Saturday afternoon watching ``Divorce Court."

``They're fighting for the littlest reasons," Burns says of the people on the show.


Media's messages
The way TV shows, hip-hop songs, and movies depict relationships influences how young viewers develop their first opinions about marriage .

``The way we figure out what we're going to do is by observational learning," July says. `` ` If I pick up a hot pot, I'm going to burn.' They look at marriage as a hot pot, too."

The unending media coverage of the divorces of Nick Lachey and Jessica Simpson , Halle Berry and Eric Benet , or Brad Pitt and Jennifer Aniston doesn't help .

``You see the celebrities," says Burns. ``Three years and then they've broke up. You might as well not go that route."

July, who is 40 and has been married for eight years, remembers what happened when he announced his engagement to his friends. One was indifferent; another said, ``What the hell are you doing that for? You're making a mistake."

July, who is African-American, thinks that if he didn't have the example of his parents, who have been married for 50 years, he might have been influenced by those comments. Many African- Americans lack the successful model his parents provided, he says.

Not all messages teens receive about relationships are bleak. Glass has an uncle who's lived with his partner for 25 years; the only married people Glass says he knows are a gay couple who live across the street . But Glass has gotten good advice from his aunt on how to make a relationship work.

``She said you and your partner . . . pretty much have to have life straightened out first," he says . ``Don't plan it out after you get married. Plan out your life first and then you can go and get married."

While Patterson suspects a social or moral shift will have to occur to change current marriage trends, July wonders whether the declining marriage rates will lead to a new form of relationships. July doesn't know what those relationships will look like, but he wants to do research on how economically independent middle class women choose mates.

The answers may help show the form of future relationships.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: mivida2k on August 09, 2006, 04:10:55 PM
The Unmaking of a Senator: How Bloggers Pulled It Off

With Lieberman's primary loss, the netroots movement has established itself as a power center among Democrats. But will its influence haunt the party in November?
By PERRY BACON, JR/WASHINGTON


Now that it has played a major role in helping to defeat Joe Lieberman in the Connecticut Senate primary Tuesday, the Netroots' moment has finally arrived.

The much-hyped Internet activists of the Howard Dean presidential campaign, liberal blogs like Daily Kos and activist groups like MoveOn.org had generated lots of buzz, but few results at the ballot box until now. But in Tuesday's Democratic primary, the bloggers didn’t just get a win, but a victory no one could have expected even four months ago. Joe Lieberman wasn't just a three-term Connecticut Senator, he was only a few thousand votes from being the vice-president in a Democratic administration six years ago. And despite almost the entire Democratic establishment supporting his run against a virtually unknown businessman named Ned Lamont, including former President Clinton campaigning for him in Connecticut, the bloggers and Connecticut voters have essentially kicked Joe Lieberman out of the Democratic Party.

Even Lamont admitted that while he decided to enter the race himself, the blogs had long been hoping someone in Connecticut would take on Lieberman, and their support was crucial early in getting the word of his candidacy out. Markos Moulitsas of Daily Kos appeared in one of his early ads, former blogger and Internet organizer Tim Tagaris left his job at the Democratic National Committee to work on Lamont’s campaign, and bloggers from the site mydd.com headed up to Connecticut over the last several days to call voters and encourage them to support Lamont. And MoveOn.org strongly supported Lamont despite pleas from Democratic leaders not to.

Still, as the bloggers themselves admit, Lamont's victory was about far more than them. Lieberman's fervent support for the Iraq War, and his attacks on many of his party who opposed President Bush's policy there, annoyed Connecticut voters as much as bloggers. Also, aside from the war, Lieberman suffered from a feeling among many voters there that he was taking the state for granted, and liberals in the blue state were frustrated by his positions on other issues, such as his support for school vouchers. The bloggers and their supporters pumped a few thousand dollars into the race, but having a millionaire candidate like Lamont pour $4 million of his own money was crucial. Lamont's campaign manager, Tow Swan, is a veteran Connecticut political operative who helped run the strong turnout operation that helped propel Lamont to victory.

And the victory for the Netroots may not be complete. Lieberman has said that he will run as an independent, and he'll have some momentum going into that race: polls last week showed Lamont up by as much as 12 and Lieberman closed that gap to only four points. Lieberman officials already created a new rationale for seeking another run at the Senate by accusing Lamont supporters of crashing Lieberman’s website on Election Day. While a blue state, Connecticut has more independent than Democrat voters, so Lieberman's support among moderates in both parties could help him keep the seat. But it will be difficult for him, particularly with much of the Democratic establishment who backed him saying they will support Lamont now that he has won the primary.

Either way, this primary win means the Netroots now must be treated by Democratic leaders and politicians like the party’s other major power centers — pro-abortion rights groups, African-Americans and unions. There were signs before this race that the bloggers were already gaining respect. A bunch of presidential candidates showed up to the Daily Kos convention in June. Senate Democratic Leader Harry Reid and other top party officials have met with MoveOn.org staffers to discuss strategy. And in recent weeks, Hillary Clinton has hired a blog outreach adviser and called for Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld's resignation, two moves that could help her win the favor of the liberal activists if she decides to run for the Democratic presidential nomination next year. Now that the Netroots' power has been cemented, any Democratic presidential candidate will have to consider how to woo these Internet activists — or at least keep them from hating him or her.

But while it may empower the bloggers, Republicans are predicting Lieberman's defeat will actually help them keep control of Congress this November — and many Democrats have the same worry. Lamont's victory will no doubt give Republicans ammunition to caricature the Democratic Party as too liberal.

Mary Matalin, an outside adviser to the White House, signaled the message when she said on Fox News Channel shortly after the polls closed: "MoveOn is not fringe. They're the heart of the party." One House Democratic official said party members had been "urgently trying to send the message to Connecticut voters that a Lieberman loss jeopardizes our ability to take back the House." Some Democratic officials said they can already imagine the ads in November races saying that Lieberman, once within a few hundred votes of being Vice President of the United States, is now "not liberal enough" for the Democratic Party.

On the other hand, Lamont's campaign strategy wasn't particularly different from the one Democrats are using all over the country against Republicans in every other race: he attacked Lieberman for his embrace of Bush’s Iraq policy and more generally of being too supportive of Bush. Lamont's victory also suggests there’s an anti-incumbent mood in Connecticut, which could spell trouble for the three House Republicans there.

But for now, this race sends one clear overriding message: in a liberal state like Connecticut, Democratic candidates defy the Netroots, who are here to stay, at their own peril.

With reporting by Mike Allen/Washington
 
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: mivida2k on August 09, 2006, 04:13:29 PM
Why was only Jolie's biological kid waxed?

By ANI
Friday July 28, 11:03 AM

New York, July 28 (ANI): Madame Tussauds wax museum raised more than a few eyebrows this week after it unveiled the "Jolie-Pitt family" wax figures of Angelina Jolie, Brad Pitt and Shiloh Nouvel Jolie Pitt, but left out the Jolie-Pitt family's adopted children, Maddox and Zahara.

"It is ridiculous. It is as if the two adopted children aren't really a part of the family because they are not biological," an observer was quoted by the New York Post, as saying.

Pitt's publicist didn't return calls. A rep for the museum said via fax, "No requests were received for figures of Maddox or Zahara."

Meanwhile, the museum will donate 1 dollar to UNICEF from each "family photo" purchased by guests at the 42nd Street attraction who pose with the wax baby. (ANI)

Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: BrerAnansi on August 09, 2006, 06:17:33 PM
Meh...
The interest in celebrity children derives completely from the fact that they are "products" of their celebrity parents...Zahara and Maddox are always refered to in the press as Angelina's adopted children, whereas the entertainment press waited with bated breath for the arrival of "Baby Jolie-Pitt" and the "TomKat" baby...when prior to that Brad Pitt had already adopted the other two children...and Tom Cruise and Nicole Kidman(who together make a far higher-profile match than Tom and Katie) already had two children...

In the same way, there has always been interest in the press as to whether Michael Jackson is actually the father of his children...proof of paternity or not, point of fact is that he is their father...in the world of celebrity worship that nebulous thing that attracts us to an entertainer in the first place whether it be athletic prowress, artistic acheivement or just plain good looks can be passed on to their biological offspring (note the current crop of famous "Celebrity kids" - Kate Hudson, Drew Barrymore, Liv Tyler etc.) but not to children that are biological strangers...in short, generally if you're the sort of person that cares about Angelina Jolie's personal life then the distinction matters to you...and Madame Tussaud's knows its audience only too well....
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: mivida2k on August 09, 2006, 07:53:33 PM
I thought this was interesting. Did most folks on the board grow in single-parent homes? I understand some of the opposition to marriage, but I can't help but think if I grew up in a single-parent home I would be more inclined to want to get married b/c I wouldn't want to have to do it all on my own--which is what my friends who are single moms, or grew up with single moms seem to have to do. thoughts?


When I tell people that my parents have been married "forever" and dated in high school they can't believe it.  My family was always considered the Walsh family (for you 90210 watchers). 

I think that there are two things that determine interest in marriage and a successful marriage:

If your parents have a stable marriage more than likely you will too.  If members of your family have held down a successful marriage then you will probably also want to get married and stay married because you have positive examples. 

There is also the argument that if your parents had a rocky marriage, divorced, never got married you may be more inclined to have a successful marriage. 

So it could go either way. 

I have a friend who got married right out of high school.  In fact several of my classmates bit the bullet. 

Is Law Professor the only BLSDer who is married?

I am glad that I am not married and I have no desire to marry.  I have things to do.  ;D :D   Men just slow ya down - too high maintenance. ;)
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: mivida2k on August 09, 2006, 08:39:26 PM
Retroactive war crime protection proposed
By PETE YOST, Associated Press Writer

WASHINGTON - The Bush administration drafted amendments to the War Crimes Act that would retroactively protect policymakers from possible criminal charges for authorizing any humiliating and degrading treatment of detainees, according to lawyers who have seen the proposal.

The move by the administration is the latest effort to deal with treatment of those taken into custody in the war on terror.

At issue are interrogations carried out by the   CIA, and the degree to which harsh tactics such as water-boarding were authorized by administration officials. A separate law, the Uniform Code of Military Justice, applies to the military.

The Washington Post first reported on the War Crimes Act amendments Wednesday.

One section of the draft would outlaw torture and inhuman or cruel treatment, but it does not contain prohibitions from Article 3 of the Geneva Conventions against "outrages upon personal dignity, in particular humiliating and degrading treatment." A copy of the section of the draft was obtained by The Associated Press.

The White House, without elaboration, said in a statement that the bill "will apply to any conduct by any U.S. personnel, whether committed before or after the law is enacted."

Two attorneys said that the draft is in the revision stage but that the administration seems intent on pushing forward the draft's major points in Congress after Labor Day. The two attorneys spoke on condition of anonymity because their sources did not authorize them to release the information.

"I think what this bill can do is in effect immunize past crimes. That's why it's so dangerous," said a third attorney, Eugene Fidell, president of the National Institute of Military Justice.

Fidell said the initiative is "not just protection of political appointees, but also CIA personnel who led interrogations."

Interrogation practices "follow from policies that were formed at the highest levels of the administration," said a fourth attorney, Scott Horton, who has followed detainee issues closely. "The administration is trying to insulate policymakers under the War Crimes Act."

The Bush administration contends Common Article 3 of the Geneva Conventions includes a number of vague terms that are susceptible to different interpretations.

Extreme interrogation practices have been a flash point for criticism of the administration.

When interrogators engage in waterboarding, prisoners are strapped to a plank and dunked in water until nearly drowning.

Sen. Lindsey Graham (news, bio, voting record), R-S.C., said Congress "is aware of the dilemma we face, how to make sure the CIA and others are not unfairly prosecuted."

He said that at the same time, Congress "will not allow political appointees to waive the law."

Larry Cox, Amnesty International USA's executive director, said that "        President Bush is looking to limit the War Crimes Act through legislation" now that the Supreme Court has embraced Article 3 of the Geneva Conventions. In June, the court ruled that Bush's plan to try Guantanamo Bay detainees in military tribunals violates Article 3
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on August 10, 2006, 05:52:33 AM
Plot to Bomb Jets Is Thwarted in Britain
By ERIC PFANNER
International Herald Tribune

LONDON - British authorities said Thursday that they had thwarted a terrorist plot to blow up multiple airliners traveling between Britain and the United States, creating "mass murder on an unimaginable scale."

The police said they had arrested 21 people in connection with the plot, which apparently involved plans to smuggle explosives onto aircraft in hand luggage. In response, flights into London Heathrow Airport were canceled and airlines banned hand luggage on departing planes, causing chaos and long delays.

The police did not identify the suspects or their origin, though Paul Stephenson, the deputy metropolitan police commissioner for London, said "community leaders" had been alerted about the police action, using a code word for the British Muslim community.

The authorities did not say how many aircraft had been identified for attack. Sky News put the number at six, while other reports said between three and 10.

"We think this was an extraordinarily serious plot and we are confident that we have stopped an attempt to create mass murder on an unimaginable scale," Stephenson told reporters at Scotland Yard.

He said the people had been arrested in and near London and Birmingham, and added that the searches would continue.

"We have been very successful in arresting those we were targeting but this is a lengthy operation, and no doubt there will be further developments," he told reporters.

News of the foiled plot comes little more than a year after terrorists killed 52 people in an attack on the London Underground, and nearly five years after the attacks of Sept. 11.

As heightened security measures went into effect at Heathrow, travelers were sometimes given little explanation, amid chaotic scenes.

Joanne Weslund, 68, a retired schoolteacher from Hubbardston, Mass., was critical of the way the situation had been handled by the airlines.

"It's been terrible," she said. "We are waiting in Disney-like lines. The only thing B.A. has said is it's a security breach. We are told we can bring nothing on the plane, only passport and cash. If there is a threat, people should not be on planes, but how they handled this is atrocious."

A customer service agent for British Airways told passengers, "The only thing we know for sure is Christmas Day falls on Dec. 25."

OAG, the transport industry information company, estimated that 400,000 people in Britain would be affected by the security alert. On a typical day, the firm said, 3,800 flights take off from Britain, though only about 3 percent of those are trans-Atlantic.

Officials were requiring passengers to check everything except personal items like keys, wallets, and passports, which they had to carry in plastic bags. Drinks and other liquid items were banned.

Travelers were required to remove spectacles or sunglasses from their cases, and those travelling with infants were required to taste any baby milk in front of security officials.

Britain's Department for Transport said it was requiring secondary searches of travelers headed for the United States, with a particular eye to removing any liquids they might have with them.

"We hope that these measures, which are being kept under review by the government, will need to be in place for a limited period only," the department said in a statement.

Despite the arrests, the police said other people connected with the plot might still be at large.

"We believe that these arrests have significantly disrupted the threat, but we cannot be sure that the threat has been entirely eliminated or the plot completely thwarted," Michael Chertoff, the U.S. homeland security secretary, told reporters.

The anti-terrorist action came at a time when Prime Minister Tony Blair is on vacation in the Caribbean. The government said he has spoken to President George W. Bush about the situation.

Disclosure of the plot came one day after John Reid, the British home secretary, gave a speech in which he warned that Britain faced "probably the most sustained period of severe threat since the end of the Second World War."

"This has involved close cooperation, not only between agencies and police forces in the United Kingdom, but also internationally," Reid said.

The British government has come under criticism for anti-terrorism measures imposed in the wake of the July 7 bombings last year.

Despite the extra security measures, flights were still taking off from Heathrow on Thursday morning. Other British airports also reportedly faced delays and crowding.

Ann Keating, a private investigator from Salem, Mass., who landed at Heathrow on Thursday morning, said that because of the chaotic conditions, "the ones I fell most sorry for are the kids.

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/08/10/world/europe/11terrorcnd.html?hp&ex=1155268800&en=13f881599701f2d5&ei=5094&partner=homepage
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on August 10, 2006, 05:53:30 AM
Damn terrorists.  I had almost planned to go to London next week.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: pikey on August 10, 2006, 05:58:58 AM
I thought this was interesting. Did most folks on the board grow in single-parent homes? I understand some of the opposition to marriage, but I can't help but think if I grew up in a single-parent home I would be more inclined to want to get married b/c I wouldn't want to have to do it all on my own--which is what my friends who are single moms, or grew up with single moms seem to have to do. thoughts?



My parents, grandparents, etc are all married.  I only have one aunt who is divorced.  Growing up, a good chunk of my friends' parents were married as well.  It was still 'normal' to have married parents (though a friend who had divorced parents said we were like the Brady bunch).  
My mom was 21 and had just graduated from college when they got married.  I don't think getting married too young (hs, not finished college) is a good idea, usually.  It's the rare couple that is mature enough to make it work.  Seeing positive marriages around has prevented me from being marriage adverse.  I plan to get married eventually and know that I can make it work.  The key is that people are committed, respect each other, and are willing to compromise.  
I also think that black people are too adverse to counseling.  They think its something that white people do or what you do when you're already in trouble.  Often by then its too late.  I plan to have pre-marital counselling with my husband, and it's even more important if you do not have exposure to successful marriages.  The lack of marriage in the black community has become a viscous cycle because we don't know how to be married.  Even if you have the best intentions, its a lot harder to make it when the only people you go to for advice are your single friends or your divorced mother/aunts.  It's like getting parenting advice from people who don't have kids.  You can have all the theory or second hand knowledge that you can get, but it's a lot more authentic and reliable if he/she has been through it themselves.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: crazy8 on August 10, 2006, 05:59:55 AM
Security Increases at U.S. Airports

By DAVID B. CARUSO
The Associated Press
Thursday, August 10, 2006; 8:40 AM



NEW YORK -- U.S. air travelers poured out liquids, opened their bags for inspection and endured long waits Thursday as airports heightened security and some flights were canceled or delayed after the discovery of a terror plot aimed at airlines traveling from Britain to the United States.

The airlines targeted included United Airlines, American Airlines and Continental Airlines Inc., two counterterrorism officials said Thursday, speaking on condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity of the situation.

"This is very, very serious, this is the real deal," said Rep. Peter King, chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee.

King said he was briefed on the case late Wednesday by Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff, and "it was the most concerned I have ever heard him."

American canceled three London-bound morning flights from Chicago, Boston and New York to accommodate delays at London's Heathrow airport, spokesman John Hotard said. To balance the cancellations, the airline also dropped three afternoon or evening flights from London to U.S. cities, Hotard said.

The remaining 13 flights in each direction were expected to run from 1 1/2 to 3 1/2 hours late. The cancellations were due to scheduling delays and not because of possible threats to the flights, Hotard said.

"We're going to be flying out of Heathrow today," he said. "It's just that because it's so congested right now."

Most European carriers canceled flights to Heathrow because of the massive delays created by strict new regulations banning most hand baggage.

The U.S. government raised its threat warning to the highest level for commercial flights from Britain to the United States and raised slightly the alert for all flights coming or going from the U.S.

It is the first time the red alert level in the Homeland Security warning system has been invoked, although there have been brief periods in the past when the orange level was applied. Homeland Security defines the red alert as designating a "severe risk of terrorist attacks."

The government said it was banning liquids including beverages, hair gels and lotions from flights, explaining only that liquids emerged as a risk from the investigation in Britain.

Passengers complied at the Kennedy airport terminal housing British Airways, throwing those and other products into bins.

At Dulles International Airport outside Washington, Homeland Security put up hastily printed signs warning passengers in all-red capital letters, "No liquid or gels permitted beyond security." The signs were taped up at ticket counters as well as the security checkpoints.

Passengers dumped liquids into large trash cans that were being emptied every couple minutes. People threw away water bottles, juice boxes, makeup and even a bottle of tequila.

At Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport, where American is based, extra police and dog units were sent out overnight to patrol terminals and parking garages, airport spokesman Ken Capps said.

Passengers appeared to be moving smoothly through checkpoints, he said.

At Chicago airports, the terror alert level was raised to orange, requiring all bags to be screened. Chicago aviation commissioner Nuria Fernandez said the only exceptions to the ban on liquids would be breast milk and fruit juices for small and nursing children. She urged passengers to arrive early for flights and to consider not bringing carryon luggage.

Some passengers were surprised by the ban on flying with liquids at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport. Baby formula and medicine had to be presented for inspection.

The terror plot and flight cancellations have "not yet" caused any disruption at Los Angeles International Airport, airport spokeswoman Nancy Castles said early Thursday.

She declined to comment on whether airport officials have heightened security because of the raised threat alert, but said the airport typically followed any special directives from federal authorities.

Delta Air Lines spokesman Anthony Black said Thursday morning that operations would continue normally and there would be no flight cancellations. But Delta was expecting delays on flights coming from the United Kingdom because of heightened security there, Black said.

Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: pikey on August 10, 2006, 06:05:00 AM
Damn terrorists.  I had almost planned to go to London next week.

U should be alright.  Just be prepared to sleep on a loooong boring flight.  It's hard to entertain yourself with a passport and wallet.  ;)
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: One Step Ahead on August 10, 2006, 07:49:20 AM
take the train
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: mivida2k on August 10, 2006, 07:58:02 AM
I would love to know how they are going to verify whether that is breast milk. :-\
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: pikey on August 10, 2006, 08:44:03 AM
I would love to know how they are going to verify whether that is breast milk. :-\

They were asking people to drink it in front of them!
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: mivida2k on August 10, 2006, 08:47:08 AM
I would love to know how they are going to verify whether that is breast milk. :-\

They were asking people to drink it in front of them!

They were doing that earlier and there were some complaints.

I could make a nice coconut drink that looks like "breast milk"
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: pikey on August 10, 2006, 08:48:18 AM
I would love to know how they are going to verify whether that is breast milk. :-\

They were asking people to drink it in front of them!

They were doing that earlier and there were some complaints.

I could make a nice coconut drink that looks like "breast milk"

But where are you gonna get a baby from?  :o
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: mivida2k on August 10, 2006, 08:49:28 AM
I would love to know how they are going to verify whether that is breast milk. :-\

They were asking people to drink it in front of them!

They were doing that earlier and there were some complaints.

I could make a nice coconut drink that looks like "breast milk"

But where are you gonna get a baby from?  :o

I have a nephew. :o :o :o
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: pikey on August 10, 2006, 08:51:17 AM
I would love to know how they are going to verify whether that is breast milk. :-\

They were asking people to drink it in front of them!

They were doing that earlier and there were some complaints.

I could make a nice coconut drink that looks like "breast milk"

But where are you gonna get a baby from?  :o

I have a nephew. :o :o :o

Travelling with kids is hell.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: mivida2k on August 10, 2006, 08:55:49 AM
I would love to know how they are going to verify whether that is breast milk. :-\

They were asking people to drink it in front of them!

They were doing that earlier and there were some complaints.

I could make a nice coconut drink that looks like "breast milk"

But where are you gonna get a baby from?  :o

I have a nephew. :o :o :o

Travelling with kids is hell.

He is a good kid.  Traveling with kids is only hell if they are bad meaning they have not been taught how to behave.  Home training. 
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: pikey on August 10, 2006, 09:01:59 AM
I would love to know how they are going to verify whether that is breast milk. :-\

They were asking people to drink it in front of them!

They were doing that earlier and there were some complaints.

I could make a nice coconut drink that looks like "breast milk"

But where are you gonna get a baby from?  :o

I have a nephew. :o :o :o

Travelling with kids is hell.

He is a good kid.  Traveling with kids is only hell if they are bad meaning they have not been taught how to behave.  Home training. 

Even good kids get upset and cranky.  As for babies, good look keeping them quiet!
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: mivida2k on August 10, 2006, 09:03:35 AM
I would love to know how they are going to verify whether that is breast milk. :-\

They were asking people to drink it in front of them!

They were doing that earlier and there were some complaints.

I could make a nice coconut drink that looks like "breast milk"

But where are you gonna get a baby from?  :o

I have a nephew. :o :o :o

Travelling with kids is hell.

He is a good kid.  Traveling with kids is only hell if they are bad meaning they have not been taught how to behave.  Home training. 

Even good kids get upset and cranky.  As for babies, good look keeping them quiet!

My nephew is not crazy and knows how to act.  I have never had a problem with him. 

I have kept enough and traveled with enough babies that I would be fine.  It does nto take a lot of hard work.  You just have to know what the baby needs. 

Moving on....
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on August 10, 2006, 01:06:00 PM
Travelling with kids is hell.

Watch out...the I-love-kids-on-airplanes-and-anyone-who-doesn't-hates-mankind police will get you!  :o ;)
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: pikey on August 10, 2006, 01:09:13 PM
Travelling with kids is hell.

Watch out...the I-love-kids-on-airplanes-and-anyone-who-doesn't-hates-mankind police will get you!  :o ;)

Umm, no.  I like kids, but kids on airplanes is a whooooole nother story.  Between the kickers, screamers, and whiners...
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on August 10, 2006, 01:11:44 PM
Travelling with kids is hell.

Watch out...the I-love-kids-on-airplanes-and-anyone-who-doesn't-hates-mankind police will get you!  :o ;)

Umm, no.  I like kids, but kids on airplanes is a whooooole nother story.  Between the kickers, screamers, and whiners...

Amen.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: mivida2k on August 10, 2006, 01:20:20 PM
Travelling with kids is hell.

Watch out...the I-love-kids-on-airplanes-and-anyone-who-doesn't-hates-mankind police will get you!  :o ;)

Umm, no.  I like kids, but kids on airplanes is a whooooole nother story.  Between the kickers, screamers, and whiners...

Amen.

Alci, how many black kids do you see acting a fool on a plane? 
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on August 10, 2006, 01:26:16 PM
Travelling with kids is hell.

Watch out...the I-love-kids-on-airplanes-and-anyone-who-doesn't-hates-mankind police will get you!  :o ;)

Umm, no.  I like kids, but kids on airplanes is a whooooole nother story.  Between the kickers, screamers, and whiners...

Amen.

Alci, how many black kids do you see acting a fool on a plane? 

Hm.  Good point.  Although there was this one little brat screaming behind me on the Chinatown bus to NYC.  He was cute when he finally got quiet.  But yeah.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: jerrica benton on August 10, 2006, 03:32:22 PM
I have kept enough and traveled with enough babies that I would be fine.  It does nto take a lot of hard work.  You just have to know what the baby needs. 

Do you know of any way to keep babies quiet on planes during takeoff/landing when their ears pop?  The only thing I've heard of is feeding them during that time.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: mivida2k on August 10, 2006, 04:06:06 PM
I have kept enough and traveled with enough babies that I would be fine.  It does nto take a lot of hard work.  You just have to know what the baby needs. 

Do you know of any way to keep babies quiet on planes during takeoff/landing when their ears pop?  The only thing I've heard of is feeding them during that time.

There are some drops that you can give them that helps.  I can't remember the name.  I'll get back with you. 
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: mivida2k on August 11, 2006, 07:19:23 PM
(http://www.firedoglake.com/wp-content/uploads/2006/08/liebermancheney.jpg)

Joe Lieberman is not entitled to a do-over in Connecticut.  There is no mulligan in politics.

And the fact that he apparently feels that he is entitled to one says everything you need to know about the empty, egomaniacal husk of a man that Lieberman has become — holing up in his hotel room and refusing to talk to long-time political friends who are trying to talk sense to a man who is besmirching whatever political legacy he may still have by pushing forward the "Lieberman for Lieberman" ego parade.

No one likes a whiny, poor sport and a turncoat, Joe.  No one.

According to the AP this morning, Joe Lieberman feels like a liberated loser — and he can now be himself.  The man is an eighteen year veteran of the Senate, he is 64 years of age, he lost the Democratic primary, he’s decided to thumb his nose at the Democratic voters of Connecticut…and he says that this independent run gives him "the freedom to be more like himself in the election."

Well, who in the hell has he been for the last 64 years?

Bush’s top adviser, Karl Rove, said he called Lieberman on primary night and wished him well, although he denied offering the senator help in the election’s final hours.

"I called him, he’s a personal friend, and I called him Tuesday afternoon, five o’clock thereabout, and wished him well on his election that night," Rove told reporters traveling with the president to Wisconsin. "It was a personal call."

Apparently, he’s been a pal of Karl Rove.  Don’t get me wrong, bi-partisanship can be a good thing, so long as in the negotiations you get as much as you give, and there is a true bi-partisan spirit to the bargaining.  But the word bi-partisan does not mean "hand over the loot and no one gets hurt."   Joe Lieberman lost the plot on that one a long, long time ago.

Lieberman has also been good pals with male private part Cheney.  They had a cordial debate in the 2000 campaign, and as the above photo shows, have pledged to work together (read:  Lieberman agreed to roll over at Cheney’s asking) on a number of issues from the very start of the Bush/Cheney presidency.

“If we just pick up like Ned Lamont wants us to do, get out by a date certain, it will be taken as a tremendous victory by the same people who wanted to blow up these planes in this plot hatched in England,” Mr. Lieberman said at a campaign event in Waterbury, Conn. “It will strengthen them, and they will strike again.”…

Mr. Lamont denounced Mr. Lieberman’s remarks, and some other Democrats and political analysts questioned the senator’s use of a national security hazard to buttress a political attack, especially against another Democrat.

Yet Mr. Lieberman has accused Mr. Lamont of distorting the senator’s record on Iraq, and the Connecticut race has turned into an increasingly bitter fight between two Democrats over issues of war and national security.

In a telephone interview yesterday from his vacation home in Maine, Mr. Lamont said he was disappointed by Mr. Lieberman’s tone, and he questioned whether the war in Iraq had any bearing on terrorists’ designs on Western nations. Mr. Lamont also hit back by again connecting Mr. Lieberman to President Bush, whose war plans he has endorsed at times.

“Wow,” Mr. Lamont said, after twice asking a reporter to read Mr. Lieberman’s remark about him. “That comment sounds an awful lot like Vice President Cheney’s comment on Wednesday. Both of them believe our invasion of Iraq has a lot to do with 9/11. That’s a false premise.”

Wow, facts. Novel approach, and how refreshing from Ned Lamont.  Lieberman and Cheney are so close, they apparently share messaging advisors.  Sweet.

Again, I’m all for cordiality and a real discussion of the issues.  But that does not mean that you just agree to whatever the other side wants from you so that they will continue to like you and stroke your ego.

America wants a change.  The people of Connecticut spoke to that last Tuesday — where not only Democrats, but record numbers of independent voters and Republicans registered as Democrats to be able to vote in the primary — against Joe Lieberman and his propping up of George Bush, male private part Cheney and their failed policies and Rubber Stamp Republican Congress.

E.J. Dionne hits that nail right on the head today:

…Speaking in Cleveland, Mehlman couldn’t resist starting with a little old-fashioned redbaiting. He explained Ronald Reagan’s defection from the Democratic Party this way: "He saw the beginning of the end, as a party that had vowed to fight communism became a party that set itself against those who fought communism." Ah, yes, the party of Jimmy Carter and Walter Mondale was nothing but a bunch of anti-anti-communists.

From there it was an easy leap to saying a Democratic Party — cleverly renamed the "Defeat-ocrat Party" by the RNC chairman — "that once stood for strength now stands for retreat and defeat." Translation: Anyone who dares question our botched approach is in favor of surrender….

And if being against the Iraq war makes you "extreme left," then the administration has succeeded in pushing 60 percent of Americans into that camp. That’s the proportion opposed to the war in the new CNN poll.

When he announced he was running as an independent, Lieberman issued a ringing condemnation of "petty partisanship and angry vitriol." He denounced those who offered "insults instead of ideas" and said the purpose of politics is "to lift up, not to tear down." True, and there could hardly be any more offensive examples of petty partisanship than the vitriolic screeds issued by Cheney, Mehlman and Snow — coming, as they did, just a day before we learned of a new terrorist plot against us.

We’ll never achieve authentic bipartisanship until a crowd that has clung to power by dividing us into bitter camps gets the rebuke it deserves. In the meantime, Lieberman might usefully send a copy of his speech to his friends in the White House. They divide us at our peril.

Absolutely correct. We have been travelling down the wrong road in our approach to combatting terrorism, our failure of leadership in foreign policy, and our idiotic adherence to "cowboy diplomacy" for long enough. The fact that Joe Lieberman could not recognize that the nation needs real leadership on these issues because President Bush and his Rubber Stamp Republican Congress, their profligate spending and inadequate planning having mired us in unfinished quagmires in Iraq and, increasingly, Afghanistan…the fact that our own allies trust the Bush Administration less than Joe Lieberman speaks volumes, doesn’t it?

Lieberman was held to account for his failures by voters that he now refuses to acknowledge had the right to do so.  If Joe Lieberman is searching for his "authentic" identity, he might try this one on for size:  acting like a mature adult who accepts that actions have consequences, rather than pouting and behaving like a seven year old who has taken someone else’s ball and headed off for another home.

The bottom line is this:  do you trust the Bush Administration to make the decisions that will make you and your family safer?  Do you trust a man like Joe Lieberman who, time and time again, hasn’t held them accountable for their failures?

Me neither.  Face it, COnnecticut voters just aren’t that into you.

PS — Note to Joe:  With internet service, you get what you pay for…I’m just saying.

(And for a little Friday entertainment, one of my all-time favorite songs, performed by Miss Patty LaBelle.  A Change Is Gonna Come.  If this doesn’t give you goosebumps, you aren’t breathing.)

– Christy Hardin Smith regularly blogs at Firedoglake.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: crazy8 on August 12, 2006, 07:53:46 AM
Kanye West is engaged:
People Exclusive

Kanye West Gets Engaged to Girlfriend Alexis

Friday Aug 11, 2006 11:15am EST
By Tiffany McGee and Todd Peterson
Kanye West
CREDIT: JON KOPALOFF / FILMMAGIC

Rapper and producer Kanye West is engaged, several sources have confirmed to PEOPLE exclusively.

West, 29, proposed to his girlfriend, Alexis, while overseas for two weeks recently, sources close to the singer tell PEOPLE.

Alexis, whose last name and occupation were not immediately available, was West's girlfriend prior to his October 2002 car accident, one source says.

A rep for West had no comment. This will be the first marriage for the Grammy winner.

West began his rise to fame as a producer for Roc-a-Fella Records, where he gained notice for his work on Jay-Z's 2001 album The Blueprint. He has also produced hits for artists including Ludacris and Alicia Keys.

But his career was nearly derailed by a near-fatal car accident in 2002, which inspired the single "Through the Wire" from his 2004 debut album, The College Dropout.

That record earned Grammys for best rap album and best rap song, and during his acceptance speech West thanked the car accident, saying it made him realize that, "If you have the opportunity to play this game called life, you have to appreciate every moment."

His second album, 2005's Late Registration, won Grammy awards for best rap album, best rap song and best rap solo performance.



http://celebrity.aol.com/people/ataol/articles/0,26618,1225576,00.html
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: crazy8 on August 12, 2006, 08:00:39 AM
Jay-Z Helps U.N. Focus on Water Crisis
By NICK WADHAMS
AP
UNITED NATIONS (Aug. 9) - Jay-Z boycotted premium champagne Cristal at his clubs after the brand's owner made some remarks he didn't like. Now the rap superstar has a new favorite drink: water.

Jay-Z, president of Def Jam Records, teamed up with the United Nations and MTV on Wednesday to get children involved in the fight against the worldwide water crisis. He cited statistics that 1.1 billion people live without clean drinking water and 2.6 billion lack proper sanitation.

"I figure that once I stumbled upon that, if the information was out and young people knew that these problems exist while we're having Poland Springs at Cipriani and things like that, that we'll get involved," said the 36-year-old rapper, referring to the high-class restaurant chain.

Jay-Z, whose real name is Shawn Carter, said he had been looking for a way to help people, and when he visited Africa on tour he was struck at how many of the world's poor lacked such a basic necessity.

"As I started looking around and looking at ways that I could become helpful, it started at the first thing - water, something as simple as water," he said at a news conference at U.N. headquarters. "It took very little, very little to see these numbers."

MTV film crews will follow the rapper on his worldwide tour, which begins Sept. 9. "The Diary of Jay-Z: Water for Life" will feature first-person accounts of meetings with people around the world who lack water, MTV President Christina Norman said.

Jay-Z said he wants to build 1,000 "play pumps" in Africa by the time the tour is over. The device features a rudimentary merry-go-round that pumps water from a well into a storage tank as it spins.

He also hopes that children who learn about the crisis will tell their parents, who might be able to do something about it.

U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan recalled how President Kennedy once remarked that anyone who could solve the world's water problems would get two Nobel Prizes - one for peace and one for science.

"Together, we may yet inspire a young viewer to take up President Kennedy's challenge, and claim both those Nobel Prizes," Annan said.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: mivida2k on August 12, 2006, 08:42:10 AM
Laws consider pets in domestic violence cases
By Scott Malone
Fri Aug 11, 11:52 AM ET
 


BOSTON (Reuters) - After 11 years of abuse, Susan Walsh knew her husband was a problem. He had threatened her, beat her and killed some of their turkeys and sheep, leaving the corpses out for her to find.
 
But the last straw came in 2001, when he killed her dog while she was out of town visiting family.

"He had run over my border collie, who was fairly old at that point," Walsh recalled in a phone interview. "She was blind and deaf and she never saw him coming. He just ran her over in the driveway."

Abusive spouses often use threats to pets to keep their victims from leaving, according to domestic abuse experts. To make it easier for those people to leave their abusers, domestic violence support groups and animal welfare advocates are lobbying for laws that protect pets from domestic abuse.

Maine, Vermont and New York were the first states to enact laws allowing judges to include pets in protection orders, which require abusers to stay away from their victims. The New Jersey and Illinois legislatures are considering similar measures.

"The desire to protect a pet is often a deterrent for women or victims leaving a situation like this, because they're afraid if they do, their pets will be harmed," said Sherry Lane of Caring Unlimited, a shelter in Sanford, Maine.

Despite the torment she experienced, Walsh and their two children stayed with her husband out of fear that if they left, he'd kill the rest of the animals on their 32-acre farm in Ellsworth, Maine, 250 miles northeast of Boston.

"He would use the animals and threats to them as a tool to try and control me -- 'If you try to leave, I can do this. I can do worse,"' Walsh said.

Amy, a domestic violence victim from Windsor County, Vermont, said having a pet on a protection order gets the police's attention.

After years of abuse, Amy's husband disappeared with her dog, and filed for divorce while in hiding, leaving her wondering what would befall her pet if she contested terms.

He wanted "to control me and for me to acquiesce, to say, 'Whatever you want, just give me back my dog,"' said Amy, who asked that her last name be withheld.

Two months after her husband disappeared, she learned the dog was being kept alone at an empty apartment a few miles away, fed by a local woman. She approached local police to get the dog back, but said her concerns were ignored.

"I felt that they were laughing at me, that it was, 'Come on, let's talk about what's important,"' Amy said.

She said she believes her experience would have been different if the new Vermont law was on the books then.

"If you call the police and say, 'I have an order of protection for my pet,' they are going to take it seriously because there is a reason. And without that, there's nothing," Amy said. "Is it going to protect you from a fist? No. But it's going to give you an edge."

While many women's shelters do not accept pets, programs like Pets and Women to Safety at the Animal Welfare Society of West Kennebunk, Maine, fill that void.

Steve Jacobsen, that shelter's executive director, said Caring Unlimited approached his group eight years ago, looking for a place to bring victims' pets.

His shelter now takes in 12 to 24 pets a year. Local volunteers care for them in their own homes. It's one of about 160 U.S. animal shelters that board pets of domestic violence victims, according to the Humane Society.

Domestic violence affects roughly 700,000 Americans each year, according to the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence.

Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: mivida2k on August 12, 2006, 08:45:44 AM
Google to keep storing search requests
By MICHAEL LIEDTKE, AP Business Writer
Fri Aug 11, 1:28 PM ET
 


SAN JOSE, Calif. - Although he was alarmed by AOL's haphazard release of its subscribers' online search requests, Google Inc. CEO Eric Schmidt said Wednesday the privacy concerns raised by that breach won't change his company's practice of storing the inquiries made by its users.

"We are reasonably satisfied ... that this sort of thing would not happen at Google, although you can never say never," Schmidt said during an appearance at a major search engine conference in San Jose.

The security breakdown, disclosed earlier this week, publicly exposed about 19 million search requests made by more than 658,000 AOL subscribers during the three months ended in May. Time Warner Inc.'s AOL intended to release the data exclusively to researchers, but the information somehow surfaced on the Internet and was widely copied.

The lapse provided a glaring example of how the information that people enter into search engines can provide a window into their embarrassing — or even potentially incriminating — wishes and desires. The search requests leaked by AOL included inquiries seeking information about murder techniques and nude teenage girls.

AOL's gaffe hits close to home for Google because the two companies have extremely close business ties.

Mountain View-based Google owns a 5 percent stake in AOL, which also accounted for about $330 million of the search engine's revenue during the first half of this year. AOL also depends on Google's algorithms for its search results.

Schmidt told reporters Wednesday he hadn't had time to contact AOL executives to discuss the problems underlying the release of the search data, but questioned his business partner's judgment.

"It's a terrible thing," he said during his conference remarks. "Maybe it wasn't a good idea to release it in the first place."

AOL already has publicly apologized for its handling of the search requests, calling it a "screw up."

In response to a reporter's question, Schmidt said some good could still emerge from AOL's error by raising public awareness about the issue. "It may be positive because we want people to know what can happen" to online search requests, Schmidt said.

Google keeps its users' search requests as part of its efforts to better understand what specific people are looking for on the Internet.

But by storing the search requests, Google and its competitors are creating an opportunity for the material to be mistakenly released or stolen, according to privacy advocates.

Schmidt said he is less concerned about those possibilities than the governments of countries around the world demanding to review people's search requests. "I have always worried the query stream is a fertile ground for governments to snoop on the people."

The U.S. Justice Department last year subpoenaed Google for millions of its users' search requests as part of a court case involving protections against online child pornography.

Google refused to comply, resulting in a high-profile court battle earlier this year that culminated in a federal judge ruling that the search engine didn't have to hand over individual search requests to the government.

In his meeting with reporters, Schmidt also covered familiar ground, including Google's plans to develop more advertising channels and form more revenue-sharing partnerships with content providers.

Toward that end, Google during the past week announced new business alliances with The Associated Press, Viacom Inc.'s MTV Networks and News Corp.'s rapidly growing social networking Web site, MySpace.com. The search engine also plans to start distributing radio ads within the next few months.

Google continues to negotiate with other potential partners, although Schmidt indicated nothing is likely to come to fruition during the next few weeks. "The highest priority right now is not (making) more deals, but implementing the ones we have announced," he told reporters.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: mivida2k on August 15, 2006, 08:00:38 AM
Minority population increasing in states
By STEPHEN OHLEMACHER, Associated Press Writer
Tue Aug 15, 7:18 AM ET
 


WASHINGTON - America's growing diversity has reached nearly every state.

 
From South Carolina's budding immigrant population to the fast-rising number of Hispanics in Arkansas, minority groups make up an increasing share of the population in every state but one, according to figures released Tuesday by the        Census Bureau.

"This is just an extraordinary explosion of diversity all across the United States," said William Frey, a demographer at the Brookings Institution, a Washington think tank. "It's diversity and immigration going hand in hand."

West Virginia is the exception, with its struggling economy and little history of attracting immigrants.

Frey said states that attract large numbers of immigrants can consider it a "badge of economic success." There have, however, been backlashes.

"In some places it will be awhile before they are accepted by the locals," Frey said. "All we have to do is look at this immigration debate."

Immigration policy is a big issue in this year's midterm congressional elections, and the new data help explain why. Immigrants — legal and illegal — make up a growing portion of the population in 46 states and the District of Columbia. Nationally, they went from 11.1 percent of the population in 2000 to 12.4 percent last year.

The 2005 figures are from the Census Bureau's American Community Survey, which is replacing the "long form" on the 10-year census. Starting this year, the annual survey of about 3 million households provides yearly data on communities of 65,000 or larger. By 2010, it will provide annual multiyear averages for the smallest neighborhoods covered by the 10-year census.

The data released Tuesday cover, race, immigration, education and age characteristics. Economic and housing data will be released in the coming weeks.

The survey, which cost $170 million in 2005, has limitations. For example, only people living in households were surveyed. That excludes the 3 percent of people who live in nursing homes, hospitals, college dormitories, military barracks, prisons and other dwellings known as group quarters.

Also, the numbers for Gulf Coast states do not reflect the effects of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, which scattered hundreds of thousands of people last year.

Among the findings:

_Education levels increased in every state from 2000 to 2005. Nationally, the share of adults 25 and older with at least a high school diploma increased from 80 percent to 84 percent. The share of adults with at least a bachelor's degree increased from 24 percent to 27 percent.

_Every state is getting older. Nationally, the median age — the one at which half the population is older and half is younger — went from 35.3 in 2000 to 36.4 last year.

_Hispanics increased their hold as the country's largest minority group, at 14.5 percent of the population, compared with 12.8 percent for blacks.

Hispanic is a term for people with ethnic backgrounds in Spanish- speaking countries. Hispanics can be of any race, and most in the U.S. are white. When demographers talk about the shrinking percentage of white people in America, generally they are talking about whites who are not Hispanic.

_Such whites are a minority in four states — Hawaii, New Mexico, California and Texas — and the District of Columbia. The share of white people fell below 60 percent in three other states — Maryland, Georgia and Nevada. Nationally, non-Hispanic whites make up about 67 percent of the population, down from 70 percent at the start of the decade.

California, New York, Texas and Florida have the nation's largest immigrant populations. The new data show that immigrants will travel beyond those states if there are jobs available.

South Carolina's immigrant population grew by 47 percent since 2000, more than any other state. Hispanics grew by 48 percent in Arkansas, the most of any state.

Michael MacFarlane, South Carolina's state demographer, said immigrants and Hispanics were attracted by a healthy economy that offered jobs requiring few skills.

"They are in all sorts of construction, food processing, service jobs, the whole spectrum, where they used to be primarily in agriculture," MacFarlane said.

West Virginia, meanwhile, was one of only two states in which the percentage of white people grew. The other was Hawaii, where whites are an increasing minority.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Inquirer on August 18, 2006, 08:59:23 AM
Andrew Young Resigns From Wal-Mart Post
By BERNARD McGHEE, AP

ATLANTA (Aug. 18) - Civil rights leader Andrew Young, who was hired to help Wal-Mart Stores Inc. improve its public image, said early Friday he was resigning from his position as head of an outside support group amid criticism for remarks seen as racially offensive. 

Young, a former Atlanta mayor and U.N. ambassador, was hired by Working Families for Wal-Mart in February.

"I think I was on the verge of becoming part of the controversy and I didn't want to become a distraction from the main issues, so I thought I ought to step down," he told The Associated Press.

Young, once a close associate of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., said his decision followed a report in the Los Angeles Sentinel, which he said was misread and misinterpreted.

In an interview with the weekly newspaper, Young was asked whether he was concerned that Wal-Mart causes smaller, mom-and-pop stores to close.


"Well, I think they should; they ran the 'mom and pop' stores out of my neighborhood," the paper quoted Young as saying. "But you see, those are the people who have been overcharging us, selling us stale bread and bad meat and wilted vegetables. And they sold out and moved to Florida. I think they've ripped off our communities enough. First it was Jews, then it was Koreans and now it's Arabs; very few black people own these stores."

Young, who has since apologized for the remarks, said he decided to end his involvement with Working Families for Wal-Mart after he started getting calls about the story.

"Things that are matter-of-fact in Atlanta, in the New York and Los Angeles environment, tend to be a lot more volatile," he said.

He said working with the group also was "taking more of my time than I thought."

An after-hours call to Wal-Mart was not immediately returned. Company spokeswoman Mona Williams told The New York Times for Thursday's editions that Young's comments did not reflect Wal-Mart's views.

"Needless to say, we were appalled when the comments came to our attention," Williams said. "We were also dismayed that they would come from someone who has worked so hard for so many years for equal rights in this country."

The remarks also surprised Rabbi Marvin Hier, dean and founder of the Simon Wiesenthal Center in Los Angeles, who pointed to Young's reputation of civil rights work.

"If anyone should know that these are the words of bigotry, anti-Semitism and prejudice, it's him," Hier said. "I know he apologized, but I would say this ... during his years as a leader of the national civil rights movement, if anyone would utter remarks like this about African-Americans his voice would be the first to rise in indignation."

Young came under fire from the civil rights community after his company, GoodWorks International, was hired by the advocacy group to promote the world's largest retailer. Young's company, which he has headed since 1997, works with corporations and governments to foster economic development in Africa and the Caribbean.

In an April letter to the General Synod of the United Church of Christ, Young said it was wrong for the church and others to blame Wal-Mart for world ills.

"I think we may have erred in not paying enough attention to the potentially positive role of business and the corporate multinational community in seeking solutions to the problems of the poor," Young wrote at the time.

Associated Press Writer Jeremiah Marquez in Los Angeles contributed to this report.


08/18/06 04:04 EDT
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: mivida2k on August 18, 2006, 12:50:19 PM
Rising college fees will cost us in time Commentary
by Julianne Malveaux


Why does college cost so much? Many parents are wondering just that as students gear up for the fall semester - and parents pull out their checkbooks.
 
In part, the answer rests with tuition increases that have outpaced inflation and the median family income. Our future labor market should be armed with graduates prepared for 21st-century careers, yet financial realities stand in the way for many young Americans. It's a grim picture:


• The average college graduate is burdened with more than $20,000 in student loans.


• Some parents, wanting their children to graduate loan-free, have taken to mortgaging their homes, thus jeopardizing their own retirement.


• Many students work, sometimes multiple jobs, thereby losing much of the texture of the college experience.


Despite these well-documented struggles, tuition and fees keep rising.


Compounding the problem for students: The increases aren't limited to tuition. Books have become such an exorbitant expense - often approaching $1,000 a semester - that some students share books or do without them. As USA TODAY reported Thursday, 15 state legislatures are looking at ways of getting the costs under control. Lab fees are on the rise, too.


Students are lugging the financial burden well after graduation. Even worse, perhaps, is that they're being forced to make untenable choices about their future. A public service career, for example, may take a back seat to a higher-paying job because of this debt issue.


It's tempting to blame the war-driven federal budget and the fact that states have less to allocate to higher education, but these increases began in the 1980s. Likewise, faculty salaries are a convenient target, but overall, they have barely kept up with inflation.


Education is supposed to be an equalizer. But with costs rising, students are trading down dreams of an Ivy League education for one at a state university, and from a state university to one at a community college. While all education will bear fruit, we are creating a bifurcated system in which the best education will go to those who can pay for it. Students of color and those of modest means will most likely be the ones left behind.


Need-based scholarship aid - which might otherwise mitigate the impact of this trend - has grown more slowly than "merit-based" aid, and merit-based aid is too often available to those students who have taken Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate classes that aren't always offered in inner cities.


While our nation is making it harder for young people to afford college, other countries - especially India and China - are investing in higher education. In the years ahead, there will be a global competition to find the most qualified workers. If our educational investment is any indication, they won't be found here.


Julianne Malveaux is an economist and author.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: mivida2k on August 18, 2006, 12:55:25 PM
Andrew Young steps down from Wal-Mart
By BERNARD McGHEE, Associated Press Writer 


ATLANTA - Civil rights leader Andrew Young, who was hired to help Wal-Mart Stores Inc. improve its public image, said early Friday he was stepping down from his position as head of an outside support group amid criticism for remarks seen as racially offensive.
 
Young, a former Atlanta mayor and U.N. ambassador, was hired by Working Families for Wal-Mart in February.

"I think I was on the verge of becoming part of the controversy, and I didn't want to become a distraction from the main issues, so I thought I ought to step down," Young told The Associated Press.

Young, once a close associate of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., said his decision to step down followed a report in the weekly Los Angeles Sentinel, which he said was misread and misinterpreted.

In the Sentinel interview, Young was asked about whether he was concerned Wal-Mart causes smaller, mom-and-pop stores to close.

"Well, I think they should; they ran the `mom and pop' stores out of my neighborhood," the paper quoted Young as saying. "But you see, those are the people who have been overcharging us, selling us stale bread and bad meat and wilted vegetables. And they sold out and moved to Florida. I think they've ripped off our communities enough. First it was Jews, then it was Koreans and now it's Arabs; very few black people own these stores."

Young, who has apologized for the remarks, said he decided to end his involvement with Working Families for Wal-Mart after he started getting calls about the story.

"Things that are matter-of-fact in Atlanta, in the New York and Los Angeles environment tend to be a lot more volatile," he said.

He also said working with the group "was also taking more of my time than I thought."

Reading from a statement, Wal-Mart spokesman John Simley said Friday that the company supported Young's decision to resign and that Young's comments do not reflect Wal-Mart's views.

"We are appalled by those comments," Simley said. "We are also dismayed that they would come from someone who has worked so hard for so many years for equal rights in this country."

Simley declined to comment on how the situation might affect Working Families for Wal-Mart.

The remarks surprised Rabbi Marvin Hier, dean and founder of the Simon Wiesenthal Center in Los Angeles, who pointed to Young's reputation of civil rights work.

"If anyone should know that these are the words of bigotry, anti-Semitism and prejudice, it's him," Hier said. "I know he apologized, but I would say this, ... during his years as a leader of the national civil rights movement, if anyone would utter remarks like this about African-Americans his voice would be the first to rise in indignation."

Young came under fire from the civil rights community after his company, GoodWorks International, was hired by Working Families for Wal-Mart to promote the world's largest retailer. Young's company, which he has headed since 1997, works with corporations and governments to foster economic development in Africa and the Caribbean.

In an April letter to the General Synod of the United Church of Christ, Young said it was wrong for the church and others to blame Wal-Mart for world ills.

"I think we may have erred in not paying enough attention to the potentially positive role of business and the corporate multinational community in seeking solutions to the problems of the poor," Young wrote at that time.

___

Associated Press Writer Jeremiah Marquez in Los Angeles contributed to this report.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: OES_Tiff on August 21, 2006, 12:42:34 AM
Japan expecting flood of new lawyers By KANA INAGAKI, Associated Press Writer
Sun Aug 20, 4:51 PM ET
 


TOKYO - In past years, 25-year-old law school graduate Hiroyuki Ichikawa would have been facing an almost impossible task — a bar exam with a 97 percent failure rate. Now, his chances are closer to 50-50.


 
In the most sweeping reform of Japan's legal system since World War II, the doors are opening wide for a flood of new lawyers, prosecutors and judges to handle criminal and civil cases in an increasingly litigious society.

Experts say the reforms are long overdue and underscore a big shift in social attitudes that is forcing Japan to change its longstanding policy of keeping the number of lawyers low and the public out of the courts.

"People are beginning to take more and more of their troubles to court," said Hideaki Kubori, a corporate lawyer and a professor at Omiya Law School outside Tokyo. "There are just not enough lawyers."

Japan has roughly 22,000 lawyers — one for every 5,790 people, compared with one for every 268 in the U.S. Under the old bar exam, to be scrapped in 2011, fewer than 1,500 people are allowed to pass every year. In the United States, with about twice Japan's population, the number is closer to 75,000.

To fill the vacuum, the government has decided to more than double the number of legal professionals, including lawyers, prosecutors and judges, to 50,000 by 2018. Juries for serious criminal cases will be introduced in 2009 to ease the load on judges. The first U.S.-style law school opened in 2004 and, with government encouragement, Japan now has 72 of them, including the one that Ichikawa attended.

Previously, university law departments tended to focus on the academic or theoretical side of the law. The new schools concentrate on practical training and preparing students to specialize. Their graduates are exempt from the old exam, and instead take one written specifically for them.

Economic necessity is the driving force.

Kubori noted that, for example, filings for personal bankruptcy have jumped more than fivefold over 10 years, to 219,402 in 2004. Inheritance and divorce disputes are also increasingly finding their way to court.

More important, business leaders have been campaigning for a bigger pool of lawyers specializing in tax law and intellectual property as legal discussions surrounding those issues become ever more complicated.

Less certain is whether the reforms will fix Japan's often-criticized penal justice system.

Cases often drag on for years and conviction rates are higher than 99 percent due to a system weighted heavily in favor of prosecutors, who have superior resources and status. The shortage of lawyers — especially to defend criminals — has long been a target of criticism. Defense lawyers are widely perceived as protectors of the public's enemies and are often poorly paid.

The introduction of juries, giving ordinary Japanese citizens their first chance to participate in criminal court procedures, may change that balance when it takes effect.

But defense lawyers warn the reform will not necessarily answer allegations of human rights violations and false charges that result from forced confessions with no lawyer present. They also stress that pretrial access to their clients will remain tightly restricted.

"Unlike other countries, check mechanisms by lawyers are basically nonexistent in Japan because they cannot witness interrogations," said Masashi Akita, a criminal defense lawyer. "Verbal abuses and other acts that amount to human rights violations occur all the time."

Freshly graduated Ichikawa knows the odds will remain stacked against the defenders, and therefore wants to specialize in corporate law for now.

"I think it is impossible to make a living by becoming a criminal lawyer," he said. "There are so few incentives to become one."


Oh yeah and this is from Yahoo.com.  Yep, I've been on the low.  And I'm now in orientation so I'll get back when I can.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: crazy8 on August 21, 2006, 11:51:37 AM
Tiff, I hope you'r enot sitting in orientation and online....picking up bad habits already I see. ha ha ha   ;D
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Inquirer on August 22, 2006, 08:06:57 AM
Carmakers must tell buyers about "black boxes" By John Crawley
1 hour, 37 minutes ago
 


The government will not require recorders in autos but said on Monday that car makers must tell consumers when technology that tracks speed, braking and other measurements is in the new vehicles they buy.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration regulation standardizes recorder content and sets guidelines for how the information should be disclosed. It also requires recorders to be more durable.

Privacy experts complained that consumer interests are not fully protected and information captured by recorders can be exploited.

Safety experts, consumer groups and insurance companies have long pressed the agency to mandate recorders in cars, but industry has responded voluntarily in recent years. About two-thirds of the new vehicles now produced each year contain the device that is connected to air bag systems. General Motors (NYSE:GM - news) equips all its vehicles with recorders, a company spokesman said.

Regulators sought on Monday to set basic standards for their use, saying that uniform safety data will help make future auto safety regulation more precise.

Automakers have until September 1, 2010, to comply with the notification and other requirements in the new regulation, if they choose to equip their vehicles with recorders.

The rules governing auto recorders, which are similar to the "black boxes" that store information about mechanical flight systems on commercial airliners, are intended to give law enforcement, emergency medical personnel, auto companies and safety regulators a minimum set of mechanical measurements in the seconds leading up to and during a crash.

Under the new rules, auto recorders must track vehicle speed, acceleration, and deceleration, braking, steering and some air bag functions. In some cases data on vehicle roll angle, steering inputs, and passenger safety belt use will be recorded.

Privacy experts criticized the decision to use the owners' manual to notify consumers that the vehicle contains a recorder, arguing that many people do not look at it. They also raised concerns that data could be misused for legal or insurance purposes.

"They basically punted on the privacy issues," Jay Stanley, a privacy expert with the American Civil Liberties Union, said of the NHTSA regulation. "This is a technology that is powerful and rapidly advancing and we need to bring our laws up to date."

Rae Tyson, a NHTSA spokesman, said the owner's manual is suitable for notifying consumers and stressed that recorder information is private property that cannot be downloaded without permission of the vehicle owner.

Tyson said most privacy concerns should be addressed by the courts and Congress, not by NHTSA.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: pikey on August 22, 2006, 08:14:15 AM
I think that the 'black box' in cars is a good idea.  It can help investigators figure out what happens in accidents, which is a pain if you're the person who caused the accident but a big help if you're the victim.  So many people are injured and killed by drunk drivers, and this can help to prosecute them.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: OES_Tiff on August 23, 2006, 08:23:45 PM
I think that the 'black box' in cars is a good idea.  It can help investigators figure out what happens in accidents, which is a pain if you're the person who caused the accident but a big help if you're the victim.  So many people are injured and killed by drunk drivers, and this can help to prosecute them.

Greeeeeeeaat, next we can start putting little black boxes in humans.  It too can help investigators figure out what happens in murders, rapes, and many other crimes, which is a pain if you're the person who committed the crime but a big help if you're the victim.  So many people are mugged, raped and killed by criminals, and this can help to prosecute them.   ;)

HTH
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: OES_Tiff on August 23, 2006, 08:27:02 PM
Tiff, I hope you'r enot sitting in orientation and online....picking up bad habits already I see. ha ha ha   ;D

LOL, girl did you see the time I posted that message.  I wasn't sitting in orientation.  I was up briefing cases. 
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: OES_Tiff on August 23, 2006, 08:29:46 PM
A Racy Twist for "Survivor" By Gina Serpe
Wed Aug 23, 7:21 PM ET
 


Some may call it exploiting racial tensions. CBS calls it darn good television.
 
Jeff Probst popped in on The Early Show Wednesday morning, confirming the reports that the 20 castaways for Survivor: Cook Islands will be grouped by race, with competitors divided into four tribes consisting of whites, blacks, Asians and Hispanics.


Apparently, "separate but equal" holds only the warmest of connotations for Mark Burnett.


Like a good host, Probst had nothing but praise for the producers' controversial brainchild, calling the exercise in segregation a valuable social experiment, rather than a stunt to dig up some controversy--and raise ratings.


"The idea for this actually came from the criticism that Survivor was not ethnically diverse enough, because for whatever reason, we always have a low number of minority applicants apply for the show," Probst said.


"So we set out and said, 'Let's turn this criticism into creative for the show.' And I think it fits perfectly with what Survivor does, which is, it is a social experiment. And this is adding another layer to that experiment, which is taking the show to a completely different level."


Different level, yes. Good level, still to be determined.


"If I had been a producer of this show, it is not an idea I would have come up with or given approval to," Robert Thompson, director of the Center for the Study of Popular Television at Syracuse University, told E! Online. "It's like a return back to segregated leagues in sports. The unseemly interest this will invite certainly is not worth the dramatic elements it's going to bring."


"To the less-than-open minded person, it is very easy to trash us," Burnett explained to Entertainment Weekly. "But we're smart enough to not make it negative. We're smart enough to have gotten rid of every racist person in casting."


Though more to the point, the producers haven't and can't weed out every racially sensitive person in their audience who may take offense to the seemingly archaic, and potentially socially irresponsible, division.


While the 43-year-old host admitted that the players themselves had "mixed reactions" to the racial separation, he made clear that the division was not meant to incite any controversy, add to the tension during the competition or simply be viewed as a gimmick.


"Our original idea was simply to have the most ethnically diverse group of people on TV. It wasn't until we got to casting and started noticing this theme of ethnic pride that we started thinking, 'Wow, if culture is still playing such a big part in these people's lives, that's our idea. Let's divide them based on ethnicity,' " he said.


Though not everyone is as excited about the idea as Probst and his Survivor crew.


"It sounds like a gimmick a lot of people are going to have real issues as to the taste of," Thompson said.


Referencing Burnett's previous experiments on Survivor and The Apprentice to divide teams by boys vs. girls and, more recently on the latter, by street smarts vs. book smarts, Thompson said that "these things don't often work so well in less dicey situations."


And any publicity is good publicity, right?


"As far as getting some attention, getting it talked about again, this'll do it," Thompson said. "Survivor is a great game. It's the gold standard of reality TV. But nobody seems to talk about it anymore."


Or watch it.

Survivor: Cook Islands will be the reality show's 13th installment and comes on the heels of the least watched season in the series' history. Despite garnering an Emmy nod for Best Reality Competition, Survivor: Panama--Exile Island, which split the tribes based on gender and age, averaged a franchise-low 16.8 million viewers. Hence the latest drastic measure.

CBS Entertainment president Nina Tassler told EW that while she was hesitant to give the go-ahead on the "risky idea," she finally relented, saying it was the logical next step in "a show that explores social politics."

"It's not just 18 white people," Probst told the magazine. "Suddenly you have new slang, new rituals--people doing things like making fire in ways that haven't been done on Survivor. I think we have a season where people will say you can never go back to what you were before."

It's not the first time a primetime reality show has flirted with race, though it will be the first time one follows through.

Last year, Donald Trump hinted that The Apprentice was toying with the idea of dividing his two teams by race, only to backtrack on the notion when backlash started up, saying "I personally don't like it, so it will never happen."

Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: OES_Tiff on August 24, 2006, 09:23:17 AM
Angelina Jolie sparks casting controversy

Oscar winner to play biracial widow of slain Wall St. Journal reporter

http://msnbc.msn.com/id/14157112/


Aug. 2 - Mariane Pearl might be delighted to have actress Angelina Jolie depict her in an upcoming movie, but some of you are outraged.

Pearl is the tan, biracial widow of slain Wall Street Journal reporter Daniel Pearl, whose memoir, "A Mighty Heart: The Brave Life and Death of My Husband Danny Pearl," will be adapted into a motion picture by Brad Pitt's production company.

The film, simply called "A Mighty Heart," will tell of Pearl's experience after her husband was abducted by Islamic extremists in Pakistan in early 2002. A month later, his captors released a video depicting his murder. Pearl, who is reportedly of Afro Cuban/Dutch heritage, was pregnant with their son Adam at the time.

Since the news came out a few weeks ago, message boards across the Internet have been on fire, expressing harsh criticism about Jolie playing the role of Pearl. On BET.com's own boards, user chantejoy calls the very idea a "new generation of Hollywood in blackface."

"With talent such as Halle Berry, Thandie Newton and Jennifer Beals available just to mention a few what is Hollywood's excuse for casting a white woman this time?" she asks. "Anyone who has seen a photo of Mariane Pearl can tell she is a woman of color."
© 2006 BET.com. All rights reserved.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: OES_Tiff on August 24, 2006, 09:24:27 AM
Hulett, Founder of Black Panther Party, Dies at 78


August 22, 2006

John Hulett, the civil-rights pioneer who helped found a group that became the Black Panther Party, died Monday. He was 78.



He died at his home in Mosses, Ala., surrounded by family.



During the civil-rights movement, Hulett worked to help blacks gain the right to vote and run for office despite intimidation from groups such as the Ku Klux Klan. He also became the first black to hold the office of sheriff and probate judge in Lowndes County.



He gained national recognition in 1966 when he and other black leaders formed the Lowndes County Freedom Organization, choosing the black panther as the group's symbol. The panther was chosen for its independence.



During a trip to California, Hulett and others told people about the county and the political symbol. Activists Huey Newton and Bobby Seale later used the symbol when they formed the Black Panther Party.



Hulett became one of the state's leading black politicians. He was elected Lowndes County sheriff in 1970, a position he would hold for more than 20 years. He was later elected probate judge. (AP)
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: BrerAnansi on August 24, 2006, 11:03:41 AM
I think that the 'black box' in cars is a good idea.  It can help investigators figure out what happens in accidents, which is a pain if you're the person who caused the accident but a big help if you're the victim.  So many people are injured and killed by drunk drivers, and this can help to prosecute them.


Greeeeeeeaat, next we can start putting little black boxes in humans.  It too can help investigators figure out what happens in murders, rapes, and many other crimes, which is a pain if you're the person who committed the crime but a big help if you're the victim.  So many people are mugged, raped and killed by criminals, and this can help to prosecute them.   ;)

HTH

The slippery slope argument doesn't really apply here.  It's not as if we're going off into uncharted territory. 

"The rules governing auto recorders, which are similar to the "black boxes" that store information about mechanical flight systems on commercial airliners, are intended to give law enforcement, emergency medical personnel, auto companies and safety regulators a minimum set of mechanical measurements in the seconds leading up to and during a crash.

Under the new rules, auto recorders must track vehicle speed, acceleration, and deceleration, braking, steering and some air bag functions. In some cases data on vehicle roll angle, steering inputs, and passenger safety belt use will be recorded. "


The article doesn't give any indication of there being any sort of visual or audio component to the recording.  In essence it is a catalogue of actions of the car at the time of the infraction.  I don't see the problem; a traffic violation is a traffic violation with or without detection, so it may as well be with detection.  If all consumers can be monitored with an eye to fingering that small subgroup that shoplifts, the same can be done here - especially since the stakes are much higher.

With that said, it's easy to see why "humanoid black boxes" are not the next obvious progression.  Analogous inforamtion to that that would be gathered from a car: heart rate, blood pressure, adrenaline level etc. would not help investigators in the solving of crimes.  It's the physical clues left behind by the perps that create a trail.  Besides much of this data is already gathered by doctors, medical examiners etc.  Visual/auditory information would be the only way to shed greater light on the circumstances of a crime, but that kind of "black box" would violate current privacy laws. 

Angelina Jolie: I can see why Marianne would be flattered.  But no one thought to ask whether Halle Berry/Thandie Newton wanted the role/were available and not already committed to something else.  Also, a lot of the criticism seems to stem from a belief that a "black" character should be played by a "black" actor.  While that belief is understandable and arguably justifiable, this labeling of biracial people as one race or another is becoming increasingly problematic in a world where miscegenation is more common, because like it or not, it signals an adherance to the "one-drop" rule.  This outcry would probably not have existed if Gabrielle Union or Sanaa Lathan were pegged to play Marianne and so it sort of begs the question.  When people are multi-ethnic, calling on them to identify as one ethnicity to the exclusion of the other always ends in disappointment. [see:Tiger Woods]

Survivor: Finally, television is reflecting our own sorry state back at us.  Maybe it will force society to take stock, but in all likelihood it will not and business will carry on as before: ethnic groups work together to get over on other ethnic groups.  Zero-sum reality television.     
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: OES_Tiff on August 24, 2006, 11:34:08 AM
Are you kidding me?  It wasn't a slippery slope. 

Also Known as: The Camel's Nose. (Taken from some random website).

Description of Slippery Slope
The Slippery Slope is a fallacy in which a person asserts that some event must inevitably follow from another without any argument for the inevitability of the event in question. In most cases, there are a series of steps or gradations between one event and the one in question and no reason is given as to why the intervening steps or gradations will simply be bypassed. This "argument" has the following form:


Event X has occurred (or will or might occur).
Therefore event Y will inevitably happen.
This sort of "reasoning" is fallacious because there is no reason to believe that one event must inevitably follow from another without an argument for such a claim. This is especially clear in cases in which there is a significant number of steps or gradations between one event and another.

Examples of Slippery Slope

"We have to stop the tuition increase! The next thing you know, they'll be charging $40,000 a semester!"

"The US shouldn't get involved militarily in other countries. Once the government sends in a few troops, it will then send in thousands to die."

"You can never give anyone a break. If you do, they'll walk all over you."

"We've got to stop them from banning pornography. Once they start banning one form of literature, they will never stop. Next thing you know, they will be burning all the books!"

I don't know what you read but I don't see how my statement was a slippery slope.


Not once did I allege that because they allow black boxes to be placed in cars, it will inevitably happen to human beings.  I said that we can (for the good of the victims).  For crying out loud, they've been in airplanes for years (I know it serves a different purpose in planes).  Anyhow, I was talking about her reasoning behind agreeing with the black box idea. 

And you cited privacy laws...my sentiments exactly.  You don't believe that there would be privacy concerns with someone tracking speed, seatbelt use, etc?  Moni's rationale was basically that it was for the good of the victims.  You two probably favor the Patriot Act as well.

Angelina Jolie:  How did you determine that "no one thought to ask" whether the three other biracial actresses listed were available or wanted the role?  I'm curious. 

Obviously I'm not for sure, but I can probably bet that the decision to cast Angelina Jolie had to do with all of the hype surrounding her, Brad Pitt, and Shiloh.  Also as for your point about people being forced to identify... black blood = slavery before abolishment.  I'm not concerned with how individuals classify themselves.  If, during slavery, you would've been raped, beaten, sold, or would've picked cotton, took care of the children, cooked for master, etc....you are black whether you like it or not... 

Survivor: Agreed but the ratings will be through the roof.

Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: BrerAnansi on August 24, 2006, 02:37:06 PM
Greeeeeeeaat, next we can start putting little black boxes in humans.  It too can help investigators figure out what happens in murders, rapes, and many other crimes, which is a pain if you're the person who committed the crime but a big help if you're the victim.  So many people are mugged, raped and killed by criminals, and this can help to prosecute them.   ;)

HTH

I was refering to this when I talked about the argument being a slippery slope.  You may have been kidding or whatnot, but you replied to Moni's statement by associating it with an unwanted outcome (black boxes on humans) when the implementation of one has nothing to do with the other.  Unless of ourse, the underlying idea is that once we put it in cars, it can't be too long until we put it on humans.  Which would make it a slippery slope argument.  But more importantly, I was bored so I responded.

I'm gonna leave the movie thing alone, because unless you're biracial yourself you are not privy to their worldview.  As I spent a large portion of my life in a country where "mixed people" were not lumped into one group or the other and were pretty free to align themselve as they wish, this obstinacy on the part of Americans to a more fluid defination of race is perplexing to me.  I'd think the Black community would be more open to self-defination given their history of having their identity defined for them, but I suppose there is a psychological element to this.  However, I can't say that this view appeals to me:

"Also as for your point about people being forced to identify... black blood = slavery before abolishment.  I'm not concerned with how individuals classify themselves.  If, during slavery, you would've been raped, beaten, sold, or would've picked cotton, took care of the children, cooked for master, etc....you are black whether you like it or not..." 

Slavery is abolished, and there is quite a difference between the role of gene provider/slaveowner and that of  father/mother.  But, I dunno, when in Rome, I suppose you have to do as the Romans do.   
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: One Step Ahead on August 24, 2006, 02:39:36 PM
"As I spent a large portion of my life in a country where "mixed people" were not lumped into one group or the other and were pretty free to align themselve as they wish"

which land was this?
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: BrerAnansi on August 24, 2006, 02:40:16 PM
I'll PM...
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: OES_Tiff on August 24, 2006, 03:05:46 PM
I think you went around what I said.  But whatever, I'm bored with this now.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: pikey on August 24, 2006, 03:08:02 PM

And you cited privacy laws...my sentiments exactly.  You don't believe that there would be privacy concerns with someone tracking speed, seatbelt use, etc?  Moni's rationale was basically that it was for the good of the victims.  You two probably favor the Patriot Act as well.


Umm, no.  Maybe I didn't articulate it well, but I think that the black box in cars would serve the same purpose as the black box in airplanes, to aid in the investigation of an accident.  This will hopefully act as a deterrant for reckless/impaired driving and help increase public safety in general.  It follows the same spirit as seatbelt laws, which are a government invasion for your own good.  I don't believe that driving a car on a car on a public road is an invasion of privacy when people can see you drive, police can clock your speed, etc, especially since you will be informed about the black box and it would only be used if there is an accident.  There's a huge leap from that to monitoring people's private communications without their knowledge which can potentially be used for any purpose.

 


Angelina Jolie:  How did you determine that "no one thought to ask" whether the three other biracial actresses listed were available or wanted the role?  I'm curious.  

 

Obviously I'm not for sure, but I can probably bet that the decision to cast Angelina Jolie had to do with all of the hype surrounding her, Brad Pitt, and Shiloh.  Also as for your point about people being forced to identify... black blood = slavery before abolishment.  I'm not concerned with how individuals classify themselves.  If, during slavery, you would've been raped, beaten, sold, or would've picked cotton, took care of the children, cooked for master, etc....you are black whether you like it or not...  

 

 


As for the whole Angelina Jolie saga, there's a whole nother story behind this one.  Apparently Jennifer Anniston was the one who approached Marianne, won over her trust and optioned the book for her production company (then jointly owned by her and Brad Pitt), with the intention that JA was going to play Marianne.  Brad got control of the company in the divorce settlement, which means he had control of the casting.  All of a sudden Jen is out and Angelina is in.  MP had to go along and put on a happy public face, because she had already sold the rights to the company and had no choice.
http://www.usmagazine.com/blog/category/marianne-pearl/ (http://www.usmagazine.com/blog/category/marianne-pearl/)

But yes, I agree that someone like Rosario Dawson (looks kinda similar), Halle Berry, or Thandie Newton should play the role.  There are so few stories written for women of color as is, so when an autobiography like this comes out, I think it should be played by an 'ethnic' woman.  I'd prefer the role to be played by a black or hispanic woman, but maybe that's just my opinion.  You wouldn't see an autobiography of a white woman is played by a mixed woman, so why is it the other way around?
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: OES_Tiff on August 24, 2006, 03:14:43 PM
Agreed.

Edit: (with your point about not seeing a bi-racial woman play the role in a white woman's autobiography).
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: BrerAnansi on August 24, 2006, 03:33:37 PM
My point is that Marianne can identify as she wishes, and if she sees no problem with having a white woman play her in a autobiographical film then that should tell you something about her. (Angelina Jolie/ Jennifer Anniston -  white actress in the role either way)  Similarly, some would prefer if Tiger picked a color instead of being Cablasian or whatever he is this week, but he won't and that's just the way it is.  I fully expect to see much more of this in coming years, particularly given globalization and curent immigration trends.  The arrival of more and more groups with their mestizos, douglas, mistiso, mulattoes, chapé-coolie, pointee, cafuzo and so forth will necessitate more than some catchall term.  As it is "Other" isn't doing it. 
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: OES_Tiff on August 24, 2006, 08:36:17 PM
La. mom: Black kids sent to back of bus By DOUG SIMPSON, Associated Press Writer
Thu Aug 24, 7:38 PM ET
 


COUSHATTA, La. - A Louisiana school district suspended a white bus driver while it investigates complaints that she ordered nine black children to sit at the back of the bus.

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No previous complaints have been lodged against the driver, who has worked several years for the Red River Parish school district, school Superintendent Kay Easley said Thursday. She refused to reveal the driver's name.

"I'm trying to get all this straight, and settled, so we can all move on," Easley said.

Two mothers, both black, sparked the investigation with a complaint on Monday that their children and the other black children had been ordered to sit in two rows of seats in the rear of the bus.

"In all these years, I've never had a problem like this," said Janice Williams, whose four children ride public school buses.

One of her children, Jarvonica Williams, 16, said the bus driver allowed many white students to have seats all to themselves while some blacks were forced to stand or sit in others' laps.

Iva Richmond, whose 14- and 15-year-old children were on the bus, said Thursday that they previously had a black bus driver, but their bus assignment changed this year. When school started this month, the white driver told them she had assigned them seats, with the black children at the back of the bus.

Richmond said she complained to a local principal, who told the driver that if any children were assigned to seats, all would have to be.

Early last week, the driver assigned black students to two seats in the back of the bus, Richmond said.

"All nine children were assigned to two seats in the back of the bus and the older ones had to hold the smaller ones in their laps," she said.

The women said their complaints to parish school officials were not immediately addressed.

Easley said she wanted to settle the matter. She said the driver had been suspended without pay, and she would announce the results of the district's investigation at a school board meeting on Sept. 5.

NAACP District Vice President James Panell told The Times of Shreveport that he would give federal attorneys details of the situation this week.

Coushatta is a small farming town in northern Louisiana. The school district has about 1,600 students, Easley said.

___

Associated Press Writer Kevin McGill contributed to this report from New Orleans.

Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: crazy8 on August 27, 2006, 06:20:36 AM
Might have been posted already, but just reading it....it brought tears to my eyes  :'(

http://www.cnn.com/video/partners/clickability/index.html?url=/video/world/2006/08/25/koinange.oprah.africa.school.affl

*make sure your pop-up blocker isn't on.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: calitransplant on September 09, 2006, 02:42:29 PM
I'm not sure if this has been posted before. It appears the "Governator" has struck again.

Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's taped comment that Cubans and Puerto Ricans are feisty because of their mixed black and Latino "blood" set the blood of some Democrats boiling, but others say it's no big deal.

Rep. Barbara Lee (news, bio, voting record), an Oakland Democrat and a member of the Congressional Black Caucus, denounced the Republican governor's words as "racist" and "disgusting." But a spokesman for state Assembly Speaker Fabian Nunez, a Latino Democrat, dismissed them as insignificant.

"These are hardly Nixon's Watergate tapes," said Nunez aide Richard Stapler.

State Sen. Martha Escutia, a Democrat who chairs the California Legislative Latino Caucus, said Schwarzenegger "has never been disrespectful to the Latino community."

The governor's remarks were recorded during a March 3 speechwriting session with his aides. They were revealed in a story in Friday's Los Angeles Times.

At one point during the session, Schwarzenegger and his chief of staff, Susan Kennedy, speak warmly about a Republican assemblywoman and speculate about whether she is Cuban or Puerto Rican.

"They are all very hot," the governor says on the recording. "They have the, you know, part of the black blood in them and part of the Latino blood in them that together makes it."

The remarks were revealed in the midst of Schwarzenegger's Nov. 7 re-election campaign. His Democratic opponent, state Treasurer Phil Angelides, accused him of using "language that is deeply offensive to all Californians."

But Assemblyman Mervyn Dymally, a Democrat who chairs the state Legislative Black Caucus, said the only thing unusual about what Schwarzenegger said was the fact it became public.

"This is usual political banter. We do this all the time," Dymally said. "In this case, it just happened to be taped."

The Times didn't reveal how it obtained the tape.

Dymally said Schwarzenegger called him personally to offer an apology, but he told the governor none was needed.

"I said, 'Look, if in fact this were a crime, Willie Brown would be in jail right now,'" Dymally laughed, referring to the sharp-tongued former San Francisco mayor and state Assembly speaker.

The governor also apologized at a news conference outside a Santa Monica hotel on Friday.

Although Schwarzenegger said his remarks were not meant to be negative, he acknowledged he cringed when he read them in the newspaper, adding that had he heard his children speaking that way he would have been unhappy.

"Anyone out there that feels offended by those comments, I just want to say I'm sorry, I apologize," he told reporters.

He was joined by Assemblywoman Bonnie Garcia — the legislator he was discussing when he made the ethnic remarks.

Garcia, who is Puerto Rican and the Legislature's only female Hispanic Republican, said she wasn't offended. She told the Times she sometimes refers to herself as a hot-blooded Latina.

On the recording, the governor also makes pointed remarks about some legislators.

He wonders aloud if the Republican Assembly leader, George Plescia, can "control that wild bunch upstairs," referring to the Assembly's Republicans as an "unruly bunch of guys and girls."

Kennedy, a Democrat who also worked in the administration of former Gov. Gray Davis, said Plescia looks like a startled deer, a remark that Schwarzenegger finds amusing.

The governor also refers to Plescia's predecessor, Assemblyman Kevin McCarthy, as "Bakersfield boy," apparently a reference to his hometown.

McCarthy did not return a call from The Associated Press. Plescia said the governor had apologized and added, "We look forward to continued civility from all sides as we move toward the November elections."

Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on September 11, 2006, 06:22:03 AM
Dude has issues:

Chappelle plans to stay in Ohio town

Dave Chappelle is home. The comedian, who abruptly halted his hit television show last year, told the crowd at a blues and jazz festival on Sunday that he enjoys living in the community and doesn't plan to leave.

"I used to be cable's hottest star and now I'm just a Yellow Springs guy," said Chappelle, who introduced musicians and told jokes.

"Turns out you don't need $50 million to live around these parts, just a nice smile and a kind way about you. You guys are the best neighbors ever. ... That's why I came back and that's why I'm staying."

Chappelle, who lives near this southwest Ohio village, walked away from a $50 million deal to continue his "Chappelle's Show" on Comedy Central.

He made a sudden "spiritual retreat" to South Africa on the eve of the show's third season, leaving the series in limbo. He has since returned to performing standup and released the concert documentary "Dave Chappelle's Block Party."

Sunday's festival was sponsored by the African American Cross Cultural Works, an organization that Chappelle's late father, Bill Chappelle, helped found.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20060911/ap_on_en_tv/dave_chappelle
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on September 14, 2006, 04:17:01 PM
Come to think of it, I haven't heard of people using lay-away in years:

Wal-Mart Stores to cease layaway service

By MARCUS KABEL, AP Business Writer2 hours, 37 minutes ago

Wal-Mart Stores Inc. will end layaway service this year due to falling demand and rising costs, scrapping a tradition started when Sam Walton founded the chain in 1962 catering to cash-strapped rural shoppers in northwest Arkansas.

Wal-Mart said Thursday it will stop accepting layaway items Nov. 19 with a pickup deadline of mid-December. In its layaway program, customers make a down payment to hold an item and then generally had up to 60 days to pay it off, with a shorter deadline in the peak Christmas season.

Layaway services are used mainly by people at the lowest end of the income scale, who don't have credit cards and may not qualify for credit, analysts say.

The move comes as Wal-Mart is changing on many fronts, from adding upscale fashions to targeting new urban customers, in a bid to revive growth rates that have fallen behind smaller rivals such as Target Corp.

"Demand for layaway service has declined steadily as consumers turn to current options including online shopping, shopping cards and no-cost credit alternatives that were not available when the company was started," said Pat Curran, executive vice president of Wal-Mart store operations.

Analysts said most retailers have already dropped layaway service as it is expensive and cumbersome. Merchandise can be tied up for months and employees have to keep track of a steady trickle of payments.

One holdout is Kmart, a wholly owned subsidiary of Sears Holdings Corporation, which issued a statement Thursday stating that it continues to offer layaway services at its 1,300 stores.

"This is another recognition that Wal-Mart is no longer a little Ozarks company but instead is the nation's largest private employer and the world's largest retailer," said Patricia Edwards, portfolio manager and retail analyst at Wentworth, Hauser & Violich in Seattle, which manages $8.2 billion in assets and holds 51,000 Wal-Mart shares.

Still, Wal-Mart's union-backed critics said the move marked another step away from its founder's vision.

"Sam Walton's Wal-Mart — the one that 'bought American', treated workers with some dignity, and gave low income customers a chance to buy an expensive item over time — that Wal-Mart is now on permanent layaway," said Chris Kofinis, spokesman for WakeUpWalMart.com.

It is Wal-Mart's latest break with tradition this year.

Wal-Mart introduced pay caps for hourly workers last month after four decades of no limits on annual merit raises. It stopped selling guns in about a third of stores to make room for more non-hunting sporting gear. It is also tailoring stores to local demographics rather than stocking all Wal-Marts alike.

Wal-Mart said it is working on ways to make other payment methods available to shoppers with limited credit, such as Wal-Mart-specific cards that offer zero interest for the first 6 to 12 months.

Edwards said dropping layaway will not chase off Wal-Mart's lowest income shoppers because those customers still need low prices. Getting some of those shoppers to take in-house credit cards can also mean more money for the chain in the form of card fees.

Wal-Mart's shoppers have an average household income of around $30,000 to $35,000 a year, compared to $50,000 to $60,000 for customers at smaller rival Target Corp., Edwards said.

Wal-Mart spokeswoman Linda Blakley said that, as demand for layaway has dropped, the costs have gone up since the department has fewer customers.

Blakley said she did not have a precise estimate for the number of Wal-Mart's more than 1.3 million U.S. employees who will be affected.

But she said a typical layaway department has three employees. Multiplied by Wal-Mart's 3,256 U.S. discount stores and Supercenters, that would mean around 10,000 could be impacted somehow. Wal-Mart said layaway employees will be encouraged to seek new opportunities in their stores.

"We will do whatever we can to help them find those new positions," Blakley said.

Wal-Mart stores shares rose 29 cents to close at $48.37 Thursday on the New York Stock Exchange.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20060914/ap_on_bi_ge/wal_mart_layaway
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on September 23, 2006, 06:17:38 AM
Cosby: Let's all give $8 each to build slavery museum

RICHMOND, Virginia (AP) -- Bill Cosby on Friday called on each American to contribute $8 to help build a national slavery museum amid the battlefields of the Civil War.

Cosby, who already has committed $1 million to the project, joined Richmond Mayor L. Douglas Wilder on Friday in launching a new campaign to raise $100 million toward the Fredericksburg museum's $200 million price tag.

"The incentive is that they would join in with the rest of the United States of America in saying yes, as an American, I gave $8 to help build something that tells the story," he said in a teleconference with Wilder.

In a nation of some 300 million people, even a tepid response would surpass the $100 million goal, Cosby said.

He admitted this kind of campaign "generally fails badly."

"But I'm going to try again because I'm going to present this national slavery museum as a jewel that's missing in a crown."

The campaign marks the latest attempt at fundraising for the U.S. National Slavery Museum, a project in the works for more than a decade.

Wilder struggled to find a location before settling on a site near the Rappahannock River, a region where many Civil War battles were fought.

For Wilder, $8 has symbolic significance in a campaign to create what is billed as the first national museum dedicated solely to telling the story of American slavery.

"The figure 8, in shape, is both of the shackles, which is the symbol of slavery," said Wilder, a former Virginia governor and the grandson of slaves. He thought up the museum concept during a visit to Goree Island, the infamous slave shipping post in West Africa.

"If you turn it on its side, it's the symbol of infinite freedom," he said.

Wilder said the museum has about $50 million on hand.

http://www.cnn.com/2006/US/09/22/cosby.civil.war.ap/index.html
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on September 23, 2006, 06:18:06 AM
Ailing Farrakhan to followers: Carry on without me

CHICAGO, Illinois (AP) -- Minister Louis Farrakhan said in a letter to followers this month that he is seriously ill, and he asked the Nation of Islam's leaders to carry on in his absence to make sure the movement "will live long after I and we have gone."

Farrakhan, 73, said he began suffering pain earlier this year similar to 1998, when he was diagnosed with prostate cancer and underwent surgery. He said doctors discovered an ulcer in his anal area during a visit to Cuba in March.

Since then, he has lost 35 pounds while battling "serious infection and inflammation," Farrakhan said in a letter dated September 11 and published in the Nation of Islam's The Final Call newspaper.

Farrakhan said he will work hard to recover "because I do not believe my earthly work is done." He said he asked his executive board to solve problems during his recovery.

Farrakhan likened his situation to that of Fidel Castro, who temporarily relinquished power because of illness.

"While many rejoiced -- believing and thinking that if Fidel Castro and the Cuban Revolution expired they could move Cuba and the Revolution in a new direction -- his absence from the helm only proved that Cuba will not fall apart over the absence or passing of their illustrious leader," Farrakhan wrote in the letter.

He also warned followers to be "ever watchful for any smart, crooked deceiver and hypocrite who would create confusion over my present condition."

http://www.cnn.com/2006/US/09/22/farrakhan.ill.ap/index.html
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: jarhead on September 24, 2006, 12:00:29 PM
Missing: A black voice for economic equality
Since MLK’s days, many African-Americans have risen to positions of authority. Yet these leaders are failing to help blacks keep pace economically.
By Juan Williams

The most frequently asked question about black leadership in America today is: Where is the next Martin Luther King Jr.?

(Illustration by Sam Ward, USA TODAY)

In one sense, the question is misguided. Increased integration has created options for black leaders that did not exist a generation ago. Think of Colin Powell and Condoleezza Rice as secretaries of State, Stan O'Neal as chief executive and president of Merrill Lynch, Richard Parsons as head of Time Warner and Ken Williams as general manager of the baseball champion Chicago White Sox.

The list goes on.

But the continuing focus on the next King is not really about a shortage of black people in leadership positions. It's about who is at the forefront of the ongoing fight for racial equality in the nation. Who is taking leadership on difficult questions, such as how to respond to the disproportionate poverty among black and Hispanic Americans? Who is pushing to get answers to the high rate of out-of-wedlock births among blacks, now at nearly 70%? And who is dealing with shocking dropout rates for young black and Hispanic high school students, now approximately 50%, as well as the awful achievement gap for students of color who do stay in high school?

Global challenge

At the start of the 21st century, helping poor people of color to get through the doors of opportunity is the best indicator of racial progress. The major civil rights groups — the NAACP and National Urban League — have good people offering a range of programs from job training to health screenings. But on the issue of black America remaining competitive in a global economy moving away from blue-collar jobs, there is a leadership void.

The good news is that previous generations of successful black leaders offered a template for this era. Black leaders of every political ideology forcefully delivered a message centered on self-help — of taking control of one's fate — as black people struggled against slavery and then legal segregation, as well as crippling stereotypes.

Frederick Douglass wrote an editorial, "Learn Trades or Starve," to spur former slaves to keep pace with the economic changes of the late 19th century. Douglass also persuaded black men to enlist with the Union to fight the Confederacy and then argued that blood shed by blacks in uniform had earned them the right to full participation in U.S. politics and economics.

But since the 1954 Brown v. Board of Education decision banning racial segregation and the civil rights victories of the '60s, the focus of activism has shifted to government action. The message of individual empowerment has been replaced by appeals to white guilt based on a culture of victimization.

In 2004, on the 50th anniversary of the Brown decision, entertainer Bill Cosby gave a speech in which he praised the civil rights pioneers who fought to remove racial barriers, but he said too many of those newly opened doors were not being used. He pointed to children born in poverty, sky-high rates of black people in jail and the acceptance of crime in the black community. He bluntly told the audience: "Ladies and gentlemen, the lower economic people are not holding up their end in this deal."

Cosby's tough love

Cosby said many of the problems facing black America today have less to do with white racism than with internal failures, such as poor parenting. In return for speaking out, he was accused of blaming the victim, letting whites off the hook for "systemic racism" and airing black America's "dirty laundry."

Undeterred, Cosby responded a few weeks later. He said too many black leaders "want you to remain in a hole and they rejoice in your hopelessness because they have jobs mismanaging you."

Black American leadership has been so successful at overcoming cultural, political and racial opposition that it created the model for modern social movements, inspiring democratic activists in China's Tiananmen Square and the leaders of Poland's Solidarity party. The reason so many across racial and ideological lines ask about the next Dr. King is they want to know how to achieve a real revolution that will lift up the disproportionate share of minorities trapped at the bottom.

In the 21st century, black leaders must inspire people by urging them to get the highest level degree possible to keep pace in the rough-and-tumble global economy. Leaders must tell young people that even if they are in the worst school imaginable, they must not drop out; that they shouldn't have children unless they are married; that they should work to avoid drifting into crime and the living hell of the prison system. Leaders must encourage people to take any job to avoid falling out of the workforce.

More than 100 years after Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. DuBois agreed that self-help to educate children and economic power were necessary to bring blacks into the American mainstream, there is still a hunger to find the next leader to deliver that message.


Posted at 12:16 AM/ET, September 20, 2006 in Forum commentary, Race Issues/Civil rights - Forum | Permalink
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: cui bono? on October 29, 2006, 01:58:35 PM

Nearly All on Nigerian  Jet Feared Dead
ABUJA, Nigeria - A Nigerian airliner with 104 people on board slammed into the ground moments after takeoff on Sunday — the third deadly crash of a passenger plane in less than a year in this West African nation known for its notoriously unsafe air industry. Six people survived, and the rest were believed dead.

 
Among those killed was the man regarded as the spiritual leader of Nigeria's Muslims, and thousands of people gathered at a regional airport to receive his body.

The Boeing 737 crashed one minute after taking off from Abuja airport, said Sam Adurogboye, an Aviation Ministry spokesman. President Olusegun Obasanjo ordered an immediate investigation into the cause of the crash, his spokeswoman Remi Oyo said.

Rescue workers found debris from the smashed plane, body parts and luggage strewn over an area the size of a football field. The plane went down inside the sprawling airport compound about two miles from the runway. Smoke rose from the aircraft's mangled and smoldering fuselage. Its tail hung from a tree.

Emergency workers pulled blackened corpses from the wreckage, then covered the bodies with white sheets and hauled them away in stretchers. An Associated Press reporter counted at least 50 cadavers, though other bodies had been transported earlier to local morgues.

Through the day, airport security officials kept back anxious people seeking information about friends or loved ones.

Adurogboye said 104 passengers and crew had been aboard the doomed flight, and he knew of six survivors who had been taken to a hospital. "Obviously the rest are feared dead," he said.

The plane was bound for the northwest city of Sokoto, about 500 miles northwest of Abuja, state radio said, adding that it had gone down during a storm. Witnesses said there was a rainstorm around the time the aircraft took off, but rains later subsided, giving way to overcast skies.

In an announcement broadcast on state radio, the Sokoto state government announced the sultan of Sokoto, Muhammadu Maccido, died in the crash. Maccido headed the National Supreme Council for Islamic Affairs in Nigeria. The panel determines when Muslim fasts should begin and end, and decides policy for Nigeria's overwhelmingly Sunni Muslims.

Maccido was immediately flown to Sokoto, where thousands of people were at the airport to receive his body. He was buried Sunday in accordance with Islamic custom, and the Sokoto state government declared six days of mourning.

Mustapha Shehu, spokesman for the Sokoto state government, had said earlier that the sultan's son, Muhammed Maccido, a senator, also was aboard the flight, along with Abdulrahman Shehu Shagari, son of former Nigerian President Shehu Shagari, who was in office between 1979 and 1983. Their fates were not immediately known.

About half of Nigeria's 130 million people are Muslims. The country is the most populous in Africa and the continent's leading oil exporter.

Oyo said Obasanjo was "deeply and profoundly shocked and saddened ... he offers condolences to all Nigerians, especially family, friends and associates of those who may have been on board."

The 23-year-old aircraft, a Boeing 737-2B7 owned by Aviation Development Co., a private Nigerian airline, was manufactured in 1983, Adurogboye said. ADC last suffered a crash in November 1996, when one of its jets plunged into a lagoon outside Nigeria's main city, Lagos, killing all 143 aboard.

Last year, two planes flying domestic routes crashed within seven weeks of each other in Nigeria, killing 224 people.

On Oct. 22, 2005, a Boeing 737-200 belonging to Bellview airlines crashed soon after takeoff from the country's main city of Lagos, killing all 117 people aboard. On Dec. 10, a McDonnell Douglas DC-9 plane operated by Sosoliso Airlines crashed while approaching the oil city of Port Harcourt, killing 107 people, most of them schoolchildren going home for Christmas.

Earlier this month, authorities released a report blaming the Sosoliso crash on bad weather and pilot error. The investigation of the Bellview crash is still continuing.

After last year's air crashes, Obasanjo vowed to overhaul Nigeria's airline industry, blaming some of the industry's problems on corruption. Airlines were subjected to checks for air-worthiness and some planes considered unworthy were grounded.

___

Associated Press writer Dulue Mbachu in Lagos and Oloche Samuel in Kano contributed to this report.

Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: LadyKD on October 30, 2006, 10:09:34 AM
The children of Colorado's jails
By Jonathan Miller
BBC World Service 

Every day, tens of thousands of children around the world wake up behind bars.
As part of a three-part series, the BBC's Jonathan Miller examines the fate of some of the young people locked up for life in the US state of Colorado.

Over 2,000 of those currently behind bars in Colorado have no hope of ever being released. And some of these were sentenced, while still under 18, to life without parole - in violation of international human rights law.

"After we got convicted, I guess I was still in shock," says Erik Jensen, who is one of these." But once the initial flurry is over, it's just despair. You feel like anything I do is for nothing."

Law changes

When Jensen was 17, he helped a friend of his to cover up the murder of his own mother.
Jensen's friend had suffered years of physical and sexual abuse before the murder, including being raped by his own parents, although jurors trying Jensen were not told that. He was sentenced to life without parole.
"Once the prosecutor says that child is going to be filed on as an adult, that's the end of the story. Once that happens, no judge can stop it, no legislator can stop it, it just goes," said Jensen's father Curt.

"And the rest of society doesn't realise that we've changed the laws in this country, so that there is no other country that matches it in terms of what we do to our juveniles. None. Zero. In the world."
Thirty years ago, it was almost unheard of for children under 18 in the US to be tried and sentenced as adults.

But that changed after an upsurge in teenage violence across the country in the 1980s.
More than 40 states adopted laws which made it easier to try children as adults.
Tougher penalties were also introduced, which often included mandatory sentences for certain crimes.


Mandatory sentence

In Colorado, this has meant children as young as 14 have been jailed for life. Some have been sent to Limon prison, 70 miles east of Denver, which has a reputation as one of the toughest jails in the state, the scene of riots, rapes and murders.

For nine years it has housed Trevor Jones, a one-time petty criminal and drug dealer who was jailed at 17 when a con trick went badly wrong, resulting in the accidental shooting of another youth.
As with the Jensen case, the local district attorney chose to try Jones not as a juvenile, but as an adult.

Although the jury accepted that the killing was accidental, Jones was found guilty on charges that, in Colorado, carry a mandatory sentence of life without possibility of parole.

"The attorney general kept arguing, 'this is a tragic case, but the law's the law'," said his father John.
"There's a problem with the law. If nobody cares that it's tragic on both sides, if nobody cares what really happens, these laws just don't make any sense."
Once a child is charged with a crime, the district attorney or prosecutor usually has just 72 hours to decide whether that child should be tried as a juvenile or as an adult.

And many in Colorado argue there is nothing wrong with that.
Among them is Dave Thomas, head of the Colorado District Attorneys Council.
He said his "underlying belief" is that the prosecutors use good judgement when they look at these cases.
"Yes, there is a huge difference between treating them as a juvenile and treating them as an adult.
"I think you have to believe that a public official will make good choices."

Second chance

But Mary Ellen Johnson, director of the Pendulum Foundation - which lobbies on behalf of juvenile criminals - says she does not believe it should be down to a district attorney to decide a child's fate, as they are political figures.

"Other states give kids a second chance," she said."The difference between those other states and Colorado is that they go before a judge, and the judge says 'you're rehabilitatable, I'm going to stick you in the juvenile system.' "In Colorado, the district attorney makes the choice. It's up to the district attorney who's voted in by the people ­ it's a political office and so it's a slam dunk for a district attorney. He'll try these kids as an adult."

But Dave Thomas argues that it is precisely this that makes the system work.
"There is that public pressure, that's why they are elected, that's why they're in a position to make decisions," he said. "They are the voice of the people, and so they need to be sensitive about how the public feels about crime and what should happen to crime.

"It's easy for people to say 'you're being very harsh.' But when I have to sit down with the victim's family and say, 'I know that your child's dead, but this guy's going to be out on the street in five years' - that's very difficult."
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Inquirer on October 30, 2006, 10:13:34 AM
It's safe to eat KFC again  :D

KFC to stop using trans fats in some items
Restaurants scramble to replace unhealthy ingredient as NYC mulls ban
MSNBC News Services


Updated: 12:30 p.m. ET Oct 30, 2006
NEW YORK - KFC said Monday it is phasing out trans fats in cooking its Original Recipe and Extra Crispy fried chicken, Potato Wedges and other menu items, but hasn’t found a good alternative yet for its biscuits.

Health experts say trans fats raise levels of artery-clogging cholesterol and contribute to heart disease.

The restaurant chain said it will start using zero trans fat soybean oil systemwide in the United States with the rollout expected to be completed by April 2007. KFC said many of its approximately 5,500 restaurants already have switched.

KFC President Gregg Dedrick said there would be no change in the taste of the chicken and other food items.

“There is no compromise,” he said at a Manhattan news conference. “Nothing is more important to us than the quality of our food and preserving the terrific taste of our product.”

Crispy Strips, Wings, Boneless Wings, Buffalo and Crispy Snacker Sandwiches, Popcorn Chicken and Twisters also are part of the menu change.

But Dedrick said some products including biscuits will still be made with trans fat while KFC keeps looking for alternatives.

Ripple effect nationwide
The announcement came just ahead of a New York City Board of Health public hearing on a plan to make New York the first U.S. city to ban restaurants from serving food containing artificial trans fats.

If approved, New York’s ban would only affect restaurants, not grocery stores, and wouldn’t extend beyond the city limits. But experts said the city’s food service industry, with 24,600 establishments, is so large that any rule change is likely to ripple nationwide.

“It’s going to be the trendsetter for the entire country,” said Suzanne Vieira, director of the culinary nutrition program at Johnson & Wales University in Providence, R.I.


The change at KFC applies only to U.S. restaurants for now, Dedrick said. He said the company was trying to find replacement oils for its overseas restaurants. He added that KFC outlets in some countries already use trans fat-free oils, but he would not say which countries.

Artificial trans fat is so common that the average American eats 4.7 pounds of it a year, according to the Food and Drug Administration.

Trans fat increases the low-density lipoprotein, or the so-called bad cholesterol, content of food, clogging arteries and causing heart disease. Researchers at Harvard’s School of Public Health estimated that trans fats contribute to 30,000 U.S. deaths a year.


The switch was applauded by the Center for Science in the Public Interest, which sued the Louisville, Ky.-based KFC in June over the trans fat content of its chicken.

KFC isn’t the only business preparing for a trans-fat-free future.

Wendy’s International Inc., the burger restaurant chain company, has already switched to a zero-trans fat oil. Fast-food leader McDonald’s Corp. had announced that it intended to do so as well in 2003, but has yet to follow through.

New York’s thousands of independently owned restaurants are beginning to look for ways to make changes too — not all happily.

Richard Lipsky, a spokesman for the Neighborhood Retail Alliance, said many eatery owners rely on ingredients prepared elsewhere, and aren’t always aware whether the foods they sell contain trans fats.


'We thought it was safe'
Invented in the early 1900s, partially hydrogenated vegetable oil was initially believed to be a healthy substitute for natural fats like butter or lard. It was also cheaper, performed better under high heat and had a longer shelf life.

Today, the oil is used as a shortening in baked goods like cookies, crackers and doughnuts, as well as in deep frying.

Ironically, many big fast food companies only became dependent on hydrogenated oil a decade and a half ago when they were pressured by health groups to do something about saturated fat.

McDonald’s emptied its french fryers of beef tallow in 1990 and filled them with what was then thought to be “heart healthy” partially hydrogenated vegetable oil.

“They did so in all innocence, trying to do the right thing,” said Michael Jacobson of the Center for Science in the Public Interest. “Everybody thought it was safe. We thought it was safe.”

Some restaurants were still completing the changeover when the first major study appeared indicating that the hydrogenated oils were just as bad for you, if not worse.

When eaten, trans fats significantly raise the level of so-called “bad” cholesterol in the blood, clogging arteries and causing heart disease. Researchers at Harvard’s School of Public Health estimated that trans fats contribute to 30,000 U.S. deaths a year.

“This is something we’d like to dismiss from our food supply,” said Dr. Robert H. Eckel, immediate past president of the American Heart Association.

KFC is part of Yum Brands Inc., which also owns the Taco Bell and Pizza Hut chains.

The Associated Press and Reuters contributed to this report
URL: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/15474488/
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Inquirer on November 10, 2006, 01:30:30 PM
R&B Crooner Gerald Levert Dies at 40

By NEKESA MUMBI MOODY
AP
NEW YORK (Nov. 10) - Gerald Levert , the fiery singer of passionate R&B love songs and the son of O'Jays singer Eddie Levert, died on Friday. He was 40.

His label, Atlantic Records, confirmed that Levert died at his home in Cleveland, Ohio.

"All of us at Atlantic are shocked and deeply saddened by his untimely death. He was one of the greatest voices of our time, who sang with unmatched soulfulness and power, as well as a tremendously gifted composer and an accomplished producer," the statement read.

Levert first gained fame back in 1986, as a member of the R&B trio LeVert, which also included his brother, Sean. They quickly racked up hits like "(Pop, Pop, Pop, Pop) Goes My Mind," "Casanova," and "Baby I'm Ready."

But Gerald Levert 's voice - powerful and soulful, almost a carbon-copy of his father's - was always the focal point, and in 1991, he made his solo debut with the album "Private Line," which included a hit duet with his dad, "Baby Hold on to Me."

Levert became known for his sensual, romantic songs, but unlike a Luther Vandross , whose voice and songs were more genteel, Levert's music was explosive and raw - his 2002 album was titled "The G Spot."

His most recent album was 2005's "Voices."
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: cui bono? on November 10, 2006, 03:09:33 PM
 noooooooooooooooo!  Is this for real?   :'(  What the heck is going on .. seems like every body has passed in recent years. ???

R&B Crooner Gerald Levert Dies at 40

By NEKESA MUMBI MOODY
AP
NEW YORK (Nov. 10) - Gerald Levert , the fiery singer of passionate R&B love songs and the son of O'Jays singer Eddie Levert, died on Friday. He was 40.

His label, Atlantic Records, confirmed that Levert died at his home in Cleveland, Ohio.

"All of us at Atlantic are shocked and deeply saddened by his untimely death. He was one of the greatest voices of our time, who sang with unmatched soulfulness and power, as well as a tremendously gifted composer and an accomplished producer," the statement read.

Levert first gained fame back in 1986, as a member of the R&B trio LeVert, which also included his brother, Sean. They quickly racked up hits like "(Pop, Pop, Pop, Pop) Goes My Mind," "Casanova," and "Baby I'm Ready."

But Gerald Levert 's voice - powerful and soulful, almost a carbon-copy of his father's - was always the focal point, and in 1991, he made his solo debut with the album "Private Line," which included a hit duet with his dad, "Baby Hold on to Me."

Levert became known for his sensual, romantic songs, but unlike a Luther Vandross , whose voice and songs were more genteel, Levert's music was explosive and raw - his 2002 album was titled "The G Spot."

His most recent album was 2005's "Voices."
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on November 14, 2006, 02:22:28 PM
 Whites more likely to get CPR help

By Kim DixonTue Nov 14, 11:16 AM ET

Whites suffering from cardiac arrest are more likely to get potentially life-saving resuscitation than blacks, according to a study released on Tuesday.

The study's author, Robert O'Connor, director of education and research at the Christiana Care Health System, in Newark, Delaware, said lack of training in CPR, or cardiopulmonary resuscitation, among blacks is likely the reason for the disparity.

The study looked at 770 patients in Delaware who had a cardiac arrest away from a hospital in 2005, and found 45 percent of white victims received CPR to help revive them. That compared with 34 percent of the black victims, the study found.

"The most likely explanation is lack of access to training. I don't think it denotes any sort of cultural bias," O'Connor said in an interview.

The report also found blacks in the home are less likely to perform CPR, which involves chest compression and mouth-to-mouth breathing. Cardiac arrest, the abrupt loss of heart function and a pulse, is usually caused by underlying heart disease or a heart attack.

The disparity in attempts of CPR at home between blacks and whites suggests the disparity in public places is largely due to training differences between the races, O'Connor said.

"I may be an idealist, but I thought there would be no difference between the two groups," he said.

The findings were presented at the annual meeting of the American Heart Association taking place this week in Chicago, where thousands of doctors are reviewing new research on medications, procedures and public health.

Brain death starts to occur about 5 minutes after someone has a cardiac arrest with no assistance, experts say, making the help of bystanders critical.

The heart association said no statistics exist for the exact number of cardiac arrests annually, but that 250,000 people a year die of coronary heart disease without being hospitalized, which may serve as a proxy.

"The public needs to understand that they are on their own for the first couple of minutes," O'Connor said.

The CPR was also likely to be more successful when performed on whites, the study said. The restoration of a pulse occurred in 30 percent of whites, compared with 17 percent of blacks, the study said.

Researchers used 2005 phone records to call centers run by the emergency medical system, or EMS, in Delaware. The a national system is run by individual local agencies such as fire departments. Race of the victim and whether a bystander attempted CPR was recorded.

The race of the bystanders was not recorded.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20061114/hl_nm/heart_race_dc
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: jarhead on December 27, 2006, 05:58:58 PM
Prosecutorial Indiscretion
Just when you thought DA Mike Nifong couldn't make a worse mess of the Duke rape case …
By Emily Bazelon
Posted Tuesday, Dec. 26, 2006, at 3:33 PM ET
Of all the strange, shoot-self-in-foot statements from Durham, N.C., District Attorney Mike Nifong in the last few days—and there are so many—one stands out. In explaining why he is continuing to prosecute three former Duke lacrosse players on kidnapping and sexual offense charges—despite dropping rape charges—Nifong told the New York Times, "If she says, yes, it's them, or one or two of them, I have an obligation to put that to a jury." Nifong is talking about the woman who says she was attacked in the bathroom after being hired to dance at a lacrosse-team party last March. In other words, the district attorney is claiming that as long as she continues to accuse any of the Duke guys, he must press charges against them. That's so basic a misunderstanding of his own job that it raises questions about whether he is even qualified to hold it.

Prosecutors don't have an obligation to take a professed victim's accusations to a jury. They have an obligation to listen to her story, test it against the other evidence, and then decide whether to move ahead. This is the root of prosecutorial discretion. Victims don't decide when to press charges in criminal cases. District attorneys do. And much of the time, that means a victim's accusation doesn't get anywhere near a courtroom. This makes prosecutorial discretion an alarming sort of power. Prosecutors do their most important work outside of public view and are free to make decisions that they never have to explain. That's one reason they're either elected or appointed by a governor or the president—we don't give this authority to officials who simply move up the bureaucratic ladder. More to the point, the discretion they exercise is necessary. Courts don't have the resources to sort through every allegation. And they shouldn't have to, given the damage criminal charges can inflict to the accused's reputation, even if they fall apart at trial or earlier.

Prosecutorial discretion looms particularly large in rape cases. According to a 1999 law-review article on the prosecution of sex crimes, "very few rape cases proceed to a jury trial." Prosecutors are less likely to bring charges in response to allegations of acquaintance rape than of stranger rape and less likely still when a professed victim doesn't resist. From a feminist point of view, this can all seem sinister—women come to prosecutors with stories of sexual assault and come away without justice. But it also reflects a healthy underlying premise: As a rule, prosecutors shouldn't bring cases they think they can't win.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Often, accusations of sex crimes come under that heading, for all the well-worn reasons. They're often about encounters that took place in private, and they often come down to he said/she said evidentiary headaches. If it's hard to see how the proof in a case can measure up to the standard a prosecutor needs to show—guilt beyond a reasonable doubt—then it's hard to see why that case should go forward.

Take all of that and raise it to the nth power in the Duke case. Nifong has no DNA evidence against the three former players, even though the lab that did the testing used the most sophisticated methods available. He's got cell-phone and other records showing that one of the men left the party before an assault could have occurred. And now, most importantly, he's got a victim who is changing her story. She's no longer sure she was raped, the woman says, because she's not sure that penetration occurred.

As an abstract legal matter, Nifong can justify his decision to deal with this new information by dialing back the charges from rape to assault and kidnapping. Penetration is an element of a rape charge—the prosecution has to specifically prove it to win. That's not true of kidnapping or of the other sex offenses Nifong is still charging.

But that analysis is entirely beside the point. The woman's new story too conveniently explains away the lack of DNA evidence—if there was no rape, then that's why none of the men's cells can be found in the rape kit. Even if that didn't seem suspect, shifting stories by their nature set off credibility warning bells. What kind of witness will this woman make? What's the jury going to think about her changing narratives, which the defense will do everything it can to get admitted at trial?

Those are the questions prosecutors are supposed to ask. Nifong, on the other hand, hasn't even directly questioned the woman about the alleged attack. There is so much else wrong with this case—Nifong's withholding of the DNA test results from defense lawyers for months, his statements on the stand that he didn't know about the results when it's now clear that he did, the all-lacrosse-player photo lineup that the victim looked at when she identified her three alleged assailants. These are all reasons for Nifong to do himself a favor, as well as the former Duke students, by tossing this case.

Instead, he says he can't because of the woman he calls "my victim." As long as she says she's sure that these men hurt her, Nifong is saying, he's prepared to believe her, and that means a jury may, too. So, it's up to her. But this sort of stubbornness is just as misguided, in its own away, as that of the prosecutor who refuses to investigate a rape charge because he can't take a woman's accusations seriously. "You can't make everybody back away from a fight," Nifong says. Well, actually, if you're the prosecutor, you can. In fact, it's your job.

Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: atlplyr6 on December 30, 2006, 04:49:01 PM
Anything interesting in the news today?  Post it here!!!

I don't know who you are and you don't now who I am, so it would be in your best interest to keep my "name" out of your posts.  If you have beef with folks on here then that's between you and them.  I try to stay clear of this cyber drama not involving me, so I don't appreciate you trying to drag me into it.  Enough said. >:( >:( >:(

News of the day
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Lionking on January 04, 2007, 11:33:09 AM
From Diverse Online

Current News
Blacks, Hispanics Have ‘Misperception’ of Healthy Body Weight
By Associated Press
Jan 3, 2007, 07:20





A study by the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, a teaching affiliate of the Harvard Medical School, has found that overweight Blacks are two to three times more likely than heavy Whites to say they are of average weight — even after being diagnosed as overweight or obese by their doctors.

 

Weight “misperception” was most common among Black men and women, and also was found among Hispanic men (but not women) compared to Whites. The findings appear in the current online issue of the International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity.

 

Analyses of data show that the prevalence of misperception actually has increased among Blacks. “During this period we’ve seen rapid gains in obesity,” says Dr. Gary G. Bennett, the lead author of the study. “We think it’s a considerable problem that this is still not resonating among Blacks and other minorities.”

 

The study analyzed data on 6,552 overweight and obese men and women who participated in surveys between 1999 and 2002. Included in the surveys were data on height, weight, body mass index, whether they had been diagnosed as overweight by a doctor and responses to the question, “Do you consider yourself now to be overweight, underweight or about the right weight?”

 

A recent Centers for Disease Control report indicates that 34 percent of all Americans are overweight — defined as having a Body Mass Index of 25.0 to 29.9. An additional 30.5 percent are obese, defined as having a Body Mass Index of 30.0 or higher. Bennett says less pressure exists in the Black community for people to lose weight because of a cultural acceptance of higher body weights and rounder body shapes.

 

“We think that misperception can be very useful when it comes to protecting people against overly stringent body image ideals and eating disorders,” says Bennett. “But it’s a problem when people fail to realize the health consequences associated with obesity.”

 

--Associated Press

Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Madden 2007 King on January 05, 2007, 06:00:00 PM
Rest in Peace Darrent Williams, Rest in Peace...

"Real talk for a moment."  -Jemele Hill

Page 2
A Disturbing, violent trend

http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/page2/story?page=hill/070104&lpos=spotlight&lid=tab2pos1


And on a Side Note:

LAcreole, Leo, bellisima, Ladyk, and whoever else,
Thank you for understanding and coming to my defense in the "Chances" thread, and all your encouraging and kind words. ~Taps his Heart~ I show you my love. Thank you very much.

But to all you forgetful, disconnected, so-called "leave no soldier behind," uppity league, black history buffs - You know what you can do...


Back to these bibles and hopefully this motherphucin 155 or better...
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: crazy8 on January 08, 2007, 10:59:12 AM
U.S. Education Officials Question Diversity StandardCritics Say the American Bar Association's New Criterion Promotes Racial Quotas at Law Schools

By Valerie Strauss
Washington Post Staff Writer
Monday, January 8, 2007; Page A04

The Education Department's general counsel is challenging the American Bar Association's new standard on diversity in enrollment and hiring, which calls for the law schools it accredits to take "concrete action" to attract more minority students, faculty and staff.

The 400,000-member law association, which has accredited nearly 200 law schools nationwide, said it updated its standards last year after a 2003 Supreme Court ruling that said law schools could use race and ethnicity as factors in admissions with certain restrictions.

The new standard gives no specific benchmarks, but the association said it would judge results on "the totality of the law school's actions."

Some Education Department officials said the ABA's new standard effectively promotes quotas and could force schools in states that ban affirmative action to break the law. Some civil rights organizations said the new standards did not go far enough "to stem the decline" in minority enrollments in law schools.

ABA officials say the department is misinterpreting the standard and pushing an anti-affirmative action agenda while violating its own procedures for reauthorizing the ABA as an accrediting agency.

The move, critics say, is the latest in a series of legal challenges on affirmative action, including a decision by Michigan voters in November to ban the use of race in deciding public university admissions and government hiring. It comes as the ABA is seeking the Education Department's authority to continue accrediting U.S. law schools.

Supreme courts and bar examiners in all 50 states use ABA approval as a qualifying factor in making law school graduate licensing decisions.

At a Dec. 4 hearing, department officials raised a number of concerns with the ABA's stewardship of the law school accreditation program, including whether it was consistently enforcing its own policies regarding the maximum time it allows a law school to remain out of compliance with its standards -- two years.

But the most controversial issue at the hearing was about the diversity standard.

Bill James, a department official who presented the case for the government, said during the hearing: "The ABA is now requiring schools to implement quotas for enrollment and hiring of racial and ethnic minorities and women. While the agency says that Standard 212 and its interpretations do not require quotas or preferences, the language is so vague that they can be reasonably read to require just that."

William Rakes, chairman of the ABA's council on legal education and admissions to the bar, countered that the association's application "has turned into a policy issue relating to affirmative action, relating to diversity, as opposed to a consideration as to whether" the ABA is consistently applying its own standards.

The ABA said it had a similar standard that promoted diversity for 26 years unchallenged.

Ultimately, the National Advisory Committee on Institutional Quality and Integrity, an appointed panel charged with making the decision, voted to extend the ABA's role for 18 months rather than the usual five years and required the association to improve the way it carries out the task of accrediting law schools. But the committee dropped the staff recommendation to include any action on the diversity standards.

The committee sent its report to Education Secretary Margaret Spellings, and general counsel Kent Talbert said the federal agency would appeal the decision to leave the standard alone. Department spokeswoman Jane Glickman said it was not known when the appeal would be made or when Spellings would rule.

Rakes issued a statement saying the ABA "is disappointed" about the appeal and noted that the department's "own regulations for recognizing accrediting agencies do not speak to diversity standards, and therefore, cannot justify the requirement of removing diversity standards from an accrediting agency's oversight of institutions of higher education."

Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Lionking on January 08, 2007, 08:07:48 PM
 
Oprah Winfrey, Bill Cosby Face Growing Challenge by Black Professors - Marc Lamont Hill and Boyce Watkins Appear on CNN to Discuss Concerns
Black Professors concerned that Cosby and Winfrey comments on black youth are ultimately detrimental.

Philadelphia, PA (PRWEB) January 8, 2007 -- Prominent African-American professors Dr. Marc Lamont Hill and Dr. Boyce Watkins have appeared on CNN recently to challenge Oprah Winfrey regarding her perceptions of black males and inner city students. Dr. Hill, a Professor at Temple University, appeared on Showbiz Tonight and Dr. Watkins (Syracuse University) made similar statements on CNN's Paula Zahn Now. Both men are respectfully concerned that Winfrey's statements and actions may have a detrimental effect on poor African-Americans, especially men.

 What if George Bush were a Black Man?   
When asked why she built a school in Africa instead of America's inner cities, Ms. Winfrey replied, "I became so frustrated with visiting inner-city schools [in the U.S.. If you ask the kids what they want or need, they will say an iPod or some sneakers. In South Africa, they don't ask for money or toys. They ask for uniforms so they can go to school."

Dr. Hill questioned Winfrey's statements, saying that she is misdirecting her frustration with the poor condition of America's inner city schools. "[Her deployment of a Cosby-esque 'blame the victim' approach to the American educational crisis is both facile and counterproductive," says Hill, who makes regular appearances on CNN and Fox News. Hill says that it is unfortunate that "Oprah 'Everybody Gets A Car!' Winfrey sees no irony in the fact that her own show pushes many of the products that she says contribute to our youth's wanton consumerism."

Dr. Watkins agrees that Oprah's perceptions are misguided. "How in the world can you look at the deplorable statistics in our inner city schools and say that the kids are to blame for this?" says Watkins, the author of "Everything you ever wanted to know about College". "She can spend her money as she pleases, but don't attack and throw away our kids in the process."

Watkins also feels that Oprah's statements about inner city students may relate to her general perception of black males. On CNN's "Paula Zahn Now", Dr. Watkins questioned Winfrey's representation of black men on her show. "It seems that Oprah has no problem with the Grammy and Oscar winners, but when it comes to rank and file black males, she tends to ignore or misrepresent them. Her frustration with rappers even led her to edit out the comments by (hip hop star) Ludicris on her show. I was offended by that."

Hill and Watkins are also outspoken critics of Bill Cosby for his attacks on the inner city. Hill's comments in The Baltimore Sun Times and Watkins' comments on The Wendy Williams Experience have led to a powerful backlash from Cosby himself.

"Our greatest enemy in the black community is the elitism that leads some of us to think that we are better than others," says Dr. Watkins, the author of 'What if George Bush were a Black Man?' "It's easy for Bill and Oprah to says 'What's wrong with those Negroes?' It's much harder for them to engage in critical and constructive dialogue."

Dr. Marc Lamont Hill is Assistant Professor of Urban Education & American Studies at Temple University and the editor of www.barbershopnotebooks.com. He makes regular appearances in the national media, including CNN, FOX News, and various other media. Dr. Boyce Watkins is a Finance Professor at Syracuse University and author of "What if George Bush were a Black Man?" He makes regular appearances on ESPN, CNN, FOX and other networks. For interviews, call Lawrence at (502) 640-8155 or visit www.MarcLamontHill.com and www.boycewatkins.com.

###
 
 
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: One Step Ahead on January 10, 2007, 11:41:33 AM
Yale barbershop singers recovering after ambush Wed Jan 10, 11:30 AM ET
 


Members of a close-harmony group from Yale University are recovering after being ambushed and beaten up while on tour in California.

Members of the a cappella Baker's Dozen were performing at a party in San Francisco at the new year when their rendition of the "Star Spangled Banner" apparently sparked taunts and threats from fellow partygoers.

As the group left the house, they were attacked by dozens of assailants, suffering scrapes, black eyes and concussions, said Connecticut's News Channel 8.

"Besides any bruising or scrapes to the face, the main injury I suffered was I broke my jaw in two places," one of the singers, 18-year-old Sharyar Aziz, was quoted as saying.


http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20070110/ennew_afp/afpentertainmentus_070110163008&printer=1

 >:(  umm  :( this  :-\ is  :-X terrible   :D
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: ((A))P on January 10, 2007, 11:53:31 AM
Yale barbershop singers recovering after ambush Wed Jan 10, 11:30 AM ET
 


Members of a close-harmony group from Yale University are recovering after being ambushed and beaten up while on tour in California.

Members of the a cappella Baker's Dozen were performing at a party in San Francisco at the new year when their rendition of the "Star Spangled Banner" apparently sparked taunts and threats from fellow partygoers.

As the group left the house, they were attacked by dozens of assailants, suffering scrapes, black eyes and concussions, said Connecticut's News Channel 8.

"Besides any bruising or scrapes to the face, the main injury I suffered was I broke my jaw in two places," one of the singers, 18-year-old Sharyar Aziz, was quoted as saying.


http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20070110/ennew_afp/afpentertainmentus_070110163008&printer=1

 >:(  umm  :( this  :-\ is  :-X terrible   :D

more details on this here...

http://sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2007/01/10/MANDR.TMP

"The attackers allegedly include graduates from Sacred Heart Cathedral, one of city's oldest and best-known private schools."

and

"But witnesses said one of the uninvited guests -- who happens to be the son of a prominent Pacific Heights family -- pulled out his cell phone and said, "I'm 20 deep. My boys are coming."

seem like the more interesting twists in this story
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on January 10, 2007, 11:55:58 AM
I want to hear what they sang.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on January 10, 2007, 02:07:10 PM
Nets' Kidd files for divorce
By BETH DeFALCO, Associated Press Writer
January 9, 2007

TRENTON, N.J. (AP) -- New Jersey Nets star Jason Kidd filed for divorce from his wife of 10 years Tuesday, accusing her of "extreme cruelty" throughout their marriage.

In the dissolution papers, filed in state Superior Court in Bergen County, Kidd accuses Joumana Kidd of physically and mentally abusing him, threatening to make false domestic violence complaints against him to police, and of interfering with his relationship with his children.

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"The defendant's extreme and unwarranted jealousy and rage has left the plaintiff concerned about her emotional stability," the papers say.

The divorce filing came less than a day after the 33-year-old NBA player filed a domestic violence complaint seeking a temporary restraining order against his wife.

"Jason Kidd filed for divorce from his wife today on the grounds of extreme cruelty over a long period of time," Kidd's attorney, Madeline Marzano-Lesnevich, said in a statement Tuesday.

Kidd scored 10 points Tuesday night as the Nets beat the Toronto Raptors 101-86.

"I can't talk about my personal stuff," he said afterward. "I hope you guys will respect this tough situation my family is going through and that we can resolve this as quickly as possible.

"There is really no distraction," Kidd said. "This is my job."

His complaint, however, paints a detailed portrait of Joumana Kidd as a vitriolic, jealous and paranoid wife prone to public outbursts and threats, including during a recent Nets game.

According to the complaint, Joumana Kidd used the couple's 8-year-old son on Dec. 27 to sneak into the Nets locker room and rummage through Jason Kidd's locker to find his cell phone. After looking up the names and numbers on it, the complaint said she left her son behind as she went upstairs to take a front row seat, where she shouted insults at Kidd throughout the game.

The papers accuse Joumana Kidd of kicking, hitting, punching and throwing household objects at her husband as she became "increasingly controlling and manipulative" in the last few years of their union.

According to Kidd, his wife had tracking devices installed on his cars and computers and has harassed his trainer, friends and family.

The Kidds were married in 1997 and live in Saddle River. They were involved in a domestic violence matter six years ago when he was playing for the Phoenix Suns.

In that incident, Jason Kidd was arrested in January 2001 after his wife told police he hit her during an argument over their son, Trey Jason (T.J.), who was 2 at the time. Kidd pleaded guilty to spousal abuse, was fined $200 and ordered to take anger management training.

Besides 8-year-old T.J., the Kidds have 4-year-old twin daughters, Miah and Jazelle.

Despite the numerous accusations by Kidd in the complaint, he did not ask for sole custody of the children.

"It is in the best interest that the parties share physically and legal custody of the children," the complaint said.

Kidd will make more than $18 million this season.

The Kidds' home phone number is unlisted. An after-hours message left for Joumana Kidd's lawyer was not immediately returned.


http://sports.yahoo.com/nba/news?slug=ap-kidd-maritalcomplaint&prov=ap&type=lgns
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Statistic on January 10, 2007, 03:26:48 PM
I told you that female dog crazy.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: cui bono? on January 10, 2007, 03:27:22 PM
Nets' Kidd files for divorce
By BETH DeFALCO, Associated Press Writer
January 9, 2007

TRENTON, N.J. (AP) -- New Jersey Nets star Jason Kidd filed for divorce from his wife of 10 years Tuesday, accusing her of "extreme cruelty" throughout their marriage.

years of their union.

According to Kidd, his wife had tracking devices installed on his cars and computers and has harassed his trainer, friends and family.


http://sports.yahoo.com/nba/news?slug=ap-kidd-maritalcomplaint&prov=ap&type=lgns

Wowwee!  tracking devices?  That's crazy  :o

I told you that female dog crazy.

LOL. 
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Special Agent Dana Scully on January 11, 2007, 04:54:24 AM
Just M-E-A-N, he sez

Brooklyn student accuses principal of banning him
from spelling bee because he's in special ed

BY TAMER EL-GHOBASHY, ALISON FOX and CARRIE MELAGO
DAILY NEWS WRITERS

Lamarre St. Phard stands outside IS 252, where principal allegedly barred teen from bee.
How do you spell "unfair?"

A Brooklyn principal refused to allow a special education student to compete in a districtwide spelling bee because he wasn't smart enough, the student and teachers charged yesterday.

"She said, 'You don't have the brains to do it. You're gonna go to the first round and get eliminated and make the school look bad,'" said 13-year-old Lamarre St. Phard.

Lamarre, an eighth-grader at Intermediate School 252 in East Flatbush, beat out 12 students in his class to advance to a schoolwide bee last month, his teachers said.

When no other classes held spelling bees, Lamarre was given a laminated certificate naming him "school champion." But he didn't get to enjoy the honor for long.

Later that day, Principal Mendis Brown allegedly took him into her office and told him she didn't want to send a special education student to the Scripps National Spelling Bee.

"I felt embarrassed. The door was open and other people heard it, too," said Lamarre, who has behavioral problems.

The principal then organized a schoolwide spelling bee and Lamarre was eliminated, according to teachers who said a general education student was declared the winner.

When the winning student and the first runnerup got cold feet and declined to compete in the next round, Brown allegedly refused to allow the second runnerup - another special education student - to advance.

"I'm disgusted and really broken," said a teacher at the school. "We try so hard to help these kids, to tell a special ed kid that he can't go on because he's a special ed kid is unbelievable."

But Brown denied through a spokeswoman that her decisions had anything to do with whether the student was in special education classes. The spokeswoman said Brown wanted to have a legitimate schoolwide competition and when the winner and a runnerup bowed out, she decided that no students would represent the school at the districtwide bee.

Lamarre, who wants to go to culinary school, said he thinks he would have done his school proud.

"I'm gonna keep studying to show her that special ed students can participate and I'm gonna stand up for special ed students," he said. "That really hurts, to tell someone they don't have brains because they're special ed."

Originally published on January 11, 2007

http://www.nydailynews.com/front/story/487642p-410612c.html
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: One Step Ahead on January 11, 2007, 09:12:27 AM
wow thats a mess.   >:(  let the kids compete!
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Statistic on January 11, 2007, 09:20:18 AM
heartbreakin' fo' sho'.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on January 11, 2007, 09:47:45 AM
Yeah, this principal isn't too bright.  Let the kids compete.  Make a brochure: "Look!  We're so good that even our special ed kids can make it to the national spelling bee!"
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on January 11, 2007, 09:52:20 AM
Uh-oh.  The principal is from Jamaica.  Wonder if Lamarre is African-American...

http://www.canarsiecourier.com/news/2005/0407/OtherNews/402.html
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: One Step Ahead on January 11, 2007, 10:19:31 AM
Uh-oh.  The principal is from Jamaica.  Wonder if Lamarre is African-American...

http://www.canarsiecourier.com/news/2005/0407/OtherNews/402.html

look at you trying to make controvesy where there is none.  ::smh::
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on January 11, 2007, 10:36:39 AM
Lol.  You know me ;).
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: LadyKD on January 17, 2007, 06:19:13 AM
Should Illegal Drugs Be Taxed?
By CLAYTON NEUMAN
taken from TIME.com

In April of 2005, Jeremy Robbins was arrested attempting to traffic two tons of marijuana from Arizona to East Tennessee. Indicted on federal drug conspiracy charges, Robbins was soon assessed a $1.1 million fine from Tennessee's Department of Revenue. The reason: failure to comply with the state's Unauthorized Substances Tax, which requires anyone in possession of a certain quantity of contraband — in the case of marijuana, more than 42.5 grams — to buy a tax stamp from the state government and affix it on the drug.

The so-called "crack tax" applies to controlled substances like marijuana and cocaine, and also illicit alcoholic beverages like moonshine. It allows someone to anonymously purchase stamps in person from the Department of Revenue based on the type and amount of the substance ($3.50 for a gram of marijuana, $50 for a gram of cocaine, etc.) with the understanding that doing so cannot be used against them in a criminal court. Posessing drugs is still illegal — the tax works completely outside the criminal justice system. A stamp cannot provide immunity from criminal prosecution, and a conviction of possession isn't required for the Department of Revenue to assess the penalties.

Of the 726 stamps sold so far (some to collectors as novelty items), none have turned up during a seizure. The penalty for not having a stamp can exceed 10 times the original cost — and the Department of Revenue concedes that the tax was instituted with the expectation that most dealers won't buy the stamp. "Dealers can do it either way," says Assistant Commissioner for Operations Sam Chessor. "But in reality, the payoff for us is going to be on the back end, not the front end. "

And what a payoff: since the tax was enacted in 2004 it has netted Tennessee $3.5 million in extra revenue, 75% of which goes directly to the enforcement agencies that carry out the drug busts. Still, some opponents argue that adding such steep penalties on top of criminal charges amounts to a second punishment, and thus a violation of double jeopardy law. "Aside from this incredible acrimony and bill-collecting mentality," says Knoxville attorney Gregory P. Isaacs, "you are divested of all your constitutional rights."

For that reason, a Davidson County chancellor last summer ruled the tax unconstitutional, and stopped the state from collecting Robbins' $1.1 million. But the Department of Revenue, confident the ruling will be overturned on appeal, is continuing with the assessments. Says Deputy Commissioner Reagan Farr, "It's fine to have a criminal and a regulatory scheme running in tandem. We've made sure our statute is purely regulatory, not punitive." But no matter how you define it, the bottom line for Tennessee is that crime pays.

Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: dat_raw_n_tellect on January 23, 2007, 10:12:37 PM
Hey all!  I don't post often...but I am always reading your comments. ;)  I just found this article on Yahoo and thought I would post it.  Sounded interesting to me:

White Atlanta suburbs push for secession By DOUG GROSS, Associated Press Writer
Tue Jan 23, 2:27 PM ET
 


A potentially explosive dispute in the City Too Busy to Hate is taking shape over a proposal to break Fulton County in two and split off Atlanta's predominantly white, affluent suburbs to the north from some of the metropolitan area's poorest, black neighborhoods.

Legislation that would allow the suburbs to form their own county, to be called Milton County, was introduced by members of the Georgia Legislature's Republican majority earlier this month.

Supporters say it is a quest for more responsive government in a county with a population greater than that of six states. Opponents say the measure is racially motivated and will pit white against black, rich against poor.

"If it gets to the floor, there will be blood on the walls," warned state Sen. Vincent Fort, an Atlanta Democrat and member of the Legislative Black Caucus who bitterly opposes the plan. Fort added: "As much as you would like to think it's not racial, it's difficult to draw any other conclusion."

The legislation calls for amending the Georgia Constitution to allow the return of Milton County, which succumbed to financial troubles during the Depression and was folded into Fulton County in 1932.

The former Milton County is now mostly white and Republican and one of the most affluent areas in the nation. Atlanta and its southern suburbs are mostly black, are controlled by Democrats and have neighborhoods with some of the highest poverty rates in America. (Buckhead, a fashionable Atlanta neighborhood of clubs, restaurants and mansions, would remain in Fulton County.)

"The only way to fix Fulton County is to dismantle Fulton County," said state Rep. Jan Jones, the plan's chief sponsor. "It's too large, and certainly too dysfunctional, to truly be considered local government."

Jones, a former marketing executive who lives in the Fulton suburb of Alpharetta, cited the county's troubled library and public transit systems and a jail that was taken over by a federal judge because it was filthy and unsafe. He denied the move is racially motivated.

Don Petree, the 62-year-old owner of Don's Hairstyling in Roswell, another northern Fulton suburb, said many of his customers "feel like they're not being taken care of like they should be with the tax dollars they're spending. I think there's some truth to that."

Milton County would have a population of about 300,000, instantly making it Georgia's fifth-largest county.

Residents of north Fulton represent 29 percent of the county's population of 915,000 but pay 42 percent of its property taxes, according to a local taxpayers group. A split would lead to the loss of $193 million in property taxes alone for Fulton County.

About 25 miles to the south in downtown Atlanta, the Rev. J. Allen Milner said he is afraid the tax revenue loss would have a devastating effect on those who need government help the most.

"If you take that money out of their coffers, human services will suffer greatly," said Milner, a black man who runs a homeless mission and is pastor of the Chapel of Christian Love Church.

Critics of a split also worry about the future of Grady Memorial Hospital and the Atlanta area's MARTA commuter-rail system — both of which have contracts with the county.

In addition, some warn that a breakup of Fulton could harm Atlanta's international reputation as a progressive city and hurt its appeal as a business, entertainment and convention destination.

While other Southern cities erupted in violence a generation ago, Atlanta came through the civil rights movement with little strife, earning the nickname The City Too Busy to Hate. It is now home to one of the nation's largest black middle-class communities.

"This would send a clear messages to companies around the country that Atlanta may not be as progressive as it would like people to think," Fort said.

The measure would require the support of two-thirds of both the House and Senate. Then it would have to put to a statewide vote. Also, residents of what would become Milton County would have to endorse the plan.

While Republicans have majorities in both chambers, they would need to win over three Democrats in the Senate and 14 in the House to get it passed.

The legislation has support from some of the Legislature's key leaders. Republican House Speaker Glenn Richardson has referred to his top lieutenant, Rep. Mark Burkhalter, as "the member from Milton County."

___

On the Net:

Fulton County: http://ww2.co.fulton.ga.us/

House Resolution 12: http://www.legis.state.ga.us/

Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on January 24, 2007, 06:20:10 AM
I was going to post that, but didn't think many people would be interested.  I remember reading about this when they first brought it up.  It's funny how Fulton County saved Milton County in the 1930s...but now that the former Milton County is the prosperous part, they want to break off.  That said, I can't say that I blame them.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: jarhead on January 24, 2007, 01:58:20 PM
racial issue aside...ad a former PG county MD resident i do know what its like to have your county tax dollars sucked into a black holes that just so happen to be a part of the same county you live in...so from the tax dollar argument i can see their point of view...but we know that's not really the real reason  ;)
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: One Step Ahead on January 24, 2007, 02:15:37 PM
I was going to post that, but didn't think many people would be interested.  I remember reading about this when they first brought it up.  It's funny how Fulton County saved Milton County in the 1930s...but now that the former Milton County is the prosperous part, they want to break off.  That said, I can't say that I blame them.


they should cut it down the middle--create two counties both integrated.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on January 24, 2007, 04:21:40 PM
I was going to post that, but didn't think many people would be interested.  I remember reading about this when they first brought it up.  It's funny how Fulton County saved Milton County in the 1930s...but now that the former Milton County is the prosperous part, they want to break off.  That said, I can't say that I blame them.


they should cut it down the middle--create two counties both integrated.

It's about wealth more than race, I think.  In this instance, though, it is basically impossible to separate the two.  And it wouldn't make much sense just to split it down the middle...you'd still have the same problems, just on a smaller scale.  The rich (white) people don't want to subsidize the poor (black) people.  The black leaders aren't helping their case by yelling race.  They should start making emotional appeals (please help the poor!) and addressing the concerns of the rich white people.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: One Step Ahead on January 24, 2007, 04:25:10 PM
I was going to post that, but didn't think many people would be interested.  I remember reading about this when they first brought it up.  It's funny how Fulton County saved Milton County in the 1930s...but now that the former Milton County is the prosperous part, they want to break off.  That said, I can't say that I blame them.


they should cut it down the middle--create two counties both integrated.

It's about wealth more than race, I think.   In this instance, though, it is basically impossible to separate the two.  And it wouldn't make much sense just to split it down the middle...you'd still have the same problems, just on a smaller scale.  The rich (white) people don't want to subsidize the poor (black) people.  The black leaders aren't helping their case by yelling race.  They should start making emotional appeals (please help the poor!) and addressing the concerns of the rich white people.

I agree-- i favor counties that are integrated racially and socioeconomically.  The vibe should be "we are all in this together" verses hey nilla see your poor starving darker brothers...shouldn't we help em out?!!
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on January 24, 2007, 04:40:09 PM
The vibe should be "we are all in this together" verses hey nilla see your poor starving darker brothers...shouldn't we help em out?!!

That ain't gon work outside of Vermont and other such socialist havens.  You need to make the rich feel like they're getting something for their money (e.g., improved services) without putting the spotlight on what the poor are getting (and the rich are consequently being taxed for).
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: One Step Ahead on January 24, 2007, 05:17:27 PM
The vibe should be "we are all in this together" verses hey nilla see your poor starving darker brothers...shouldn't we help em out?!!

That ain't gon work outside of Vermont and other such socialist havens.  You need to make the rich feel like they're getting something for their money (e.g., improved services) without putting the spotlight on what the poor are getting (and the rich are consequently being taxed for).

well obviously--I was just speaking to your point that "They should start making emotional appeals (please help the poor!)"  Ish isn't gonna fly.  Nillas would rather send money to Africa.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on January 24, 2007, 05:19:23 PM
Lol, I'm saying that's what they should do now that they got them all riled up.  It would have been better not to let it get to that point, obviously.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: dat_raw_n_tellect on January 24, 2007, 08:57:57 PM
I was going to post that, but didn't think many people would be interested.  I remember reading about this when they first brought it up.  It's funny how Fulton County saved Milton County in the 1930s...but now that the former Milton County is the prosperous part, they want to break off.  That said, I can't say that I blame them.

Yeah Coca-Cola I thought twice about posting it as well lol!  But I too thought it was interesting to see that Fulton County saved Milton in the 1930s yet they are ready to part ways.  Like Jarhead said, I can understand that the more prosperous taxpayers would be upset that they are providing money that isn't quite being spent on their needs.  However, I am sure someone should have been able to see this coming and they shouldn't have let it escalate to this point.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on January 24, 2007, 09:24:58 PM
I agree.  I blame the black leaders in charge more than the mad white taxpayers.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: One Step Ahead on January 25, 2007, 01:03:12 AM
I agree.  I blame the black leaders in charge more than the mad white taxpayers.

no surprises there  :D
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on January 25, 2007, 05:51:08 AM
Lol, I don't like incompetence.  If there were white leaders to blame, I'd blame them too (like Congress before the Democratic takeover).
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Special Agent Dana Scully on January 26, 2007, 07:10:07 AM
Colleges Regroup After Voters Ban Race Preferences
Monica Almeida/The New York Times

The enrollment of black students at U.C.L.A. is at a 30-year low.

   
Article Tools Sponsored By
By TAMAR LEWIN
Published: January 26, 2007

With Michigan’s new ban on affirmative action going into effect, and similar ballot initiatives looming in other states, many public universities are scrambling to find race-blind ways to attract more blacks and Hispanics.
How can colleges ensure diversity if race is not considered?

 
Enrollment of black students is up at Standford University.

At Wayne State University Law School in Detroit, a new admissions policy, without mentioning race, allows officials to consider factors like living on an Indian reservation or in mostly black Detroit, or overcoming discrimination or prejudice.

Others are using many different approaches, like working with mostly minority high schools, using minority students as recruiters, and offering summer prep programs for promising students from struggling high schools. Ohio State University, for example, has started a magnet high school with a focus on math and science, to help prepare potential applicants, and sends educators into poor and low-performing middle and elementary schools to encourage children, and their parents, to start planning for college.

Officials across the country have a sense of urgency about the issue in part because Ward Connerly, the black California businessman behind such initiatives in California and Michigan, is planning a kind of Super Tuesday next fall, with ballot initiatives against racial preferences in several states. He is researching possible campaigns in Arizona, Colorado, Missouri, Nebraska, Nevada, Oregon, South Dakota, Utah and Wyoming, and expects to announce next month which states he has chosen.

Ann Korschgen, vice provost at the University of Missouri, said in a recent interview, “Just this morning, we had a conversation along the line of how we would continue to ensure diversity at our campus if we could not consider race.”

The issue is already heating up in Colorado. This month, two Republican representatives in Colorado asked the state to examine the University of Colorado’s spending on diversity, after a libertarian group questioned the expenditures.

Mr. Connerly said that a decade ago, when California passed its ban, Proposition 209, he thought the state was ahead of its time, but that now, he believes “the country is poised to make a decision about race, about what its place in American life is going to be — and I really believe the popular vote may be the way to achieve that.”

Both defenders and opponents of affirmative action say the lesson of last fall’s campaign in Michigan — where Proposition 2, banning race and gender preferences in public education, employment and contracting, passed by 58 percent to 42 percent despite strong opposition from government, business, labor, education and religious leaders — is that such initiatives can succeed almost anywhere.

“Certain things become popular as state initiatives, like the ban on gay marriages, and restrictions on affirmative action could become one of those things,” said Terry Hartle, senior vice president for government and public affairs at the American Council on Education.

If so, he said, private universities, with their wide discretion in admissions and financial aid, could have a competitive advantage regarding diversity, reshaping the landscape of higher education.

“Private universities can do whatever they want, consistent with federal law and the Supreme Court,” Mr. Hartle said. “Where minority students have a choice between selective public universities that cannot use affirmative action, and selective private universities with strong affirmative action programs, the private universities may seem like the more hospitable places, which would give them an advantage in drawing a diverse student body.”

To many educators, that would be a troubling turnabout.

“You’d think public universities are charged with special responsibility for ensuring access, but it could come to be exactly the opposite, if there are a lot of these state initiatives,” said Evan Caminker, the dean of the University of Michigan Law School, adding, “in terms of public values, it’s a big step backward.”

Mr. Connerly is unbothered: If black and Hispanic students are rare at selective universities, the solution is better academic preparation, not special treatment in admissions. “Every individual should have the same opportunity to compete,” he said. “I don’t worry about the outcomes.”

Legally, affirmative action has been a moving target. In 2003, the Supreme Court ruled in cases involving the University of Michigan that race could be one of many factors in admissions, although admissions offices could not give extra points to minority candidates. Many colleges nationwide then moved to “holistic” review, considering applicants’ ethnicity, but not awarding a set number of points. In states that could face a ballot initiative campaign, though, that standard could fall.

Nationwide, after 30 years of debate, and litigation, over affirmative action, universities have made strikingly little progress toward racially representative student bodies. And recently, with growing awareness that affluent students are vastly overrepresented at selective colleges, the longstanding focus on racial diversity has been joined by a growing concern about economic diversity.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Special Agent Dana Scully on January 26, 2007, 07:11:18 AM
Currently, four states with highly ranked public universities — California, Florida, Michigan and Washington — forbid racial preferences, either because of ballot propositions or decisions by elected officials.
How can colleges ensure diversity if race is not considered?



Texas banned affirmative action for seven years. The University of Texas resumed consideration of race after the 2003 United States Supreme Court ruling. “We need every tool we can get,” concluded Dr. Bruce Walker, the university’s director of admissions.

In California and Texas, the first two states to ban racial preferences, underrepresented minorities at the flagship universities declined — even though both states, and Florida, adopted plans giving a percentage of top high school graduates guaranteed admission to state universities.

In Texas, students admitted through the Top 10 percent plan swamped the flagship Austin campus. But the plan, now being rethought by the Legislature, never brought in many minority students. Last fall, with both race-conscious admissions and the Top 10 plan, blacks made up an all-time high of 5 percent of the freshman class, and Hispanics 19 percent.

A decade after the California ban, only 2 percent of this year’s freshmen at the University of California, Los Angeles, are black: a 30-year low. Hispanic representation at U.C.L.A. has dropped, too. At Berkeley, the number of blacks in the freshman class plunged by half the year after the ban, and the number of Hispanics nearly as much.

Systemwide, blacks make up only 3 percent of U.C. freshmen, although about 7 percent of the state’s high school graduates are black. Most top black students choose private institutions over state campuses. Over all, of the top third of all students offered admission to the University of California class of 2005, most enrolled and only 19 percent went instead to selective private colleges. But among blacks in that group, 51 percent chose selective private colleges. Meanwhile, up the coast, Stanford University is enrolling more underrepresented minority students. Among this year’s freshmen, 11 percent are African-American, up from 8 percent in 1995; Hispanic enrollment has risen, too.

“Folks look for a place that’s comfortable,” said Richard Shaw, Stanford’s admissions dean. “They want a sense that there’s kids like them at the institution.”

The University of Michigan, with other state institutions, tried to win a delay of the ban so it would not hit in the middle of this year’s admissions cycle. But the courts rejected this effort, so officials have stopped considering race and gender as factors in admissions, and worry that next year’s entering class will be less diverse. Many officials worry that they will lose top minority candidates to selective private universities.

“We know from colleagues in Texas and California that if we can’t take race into account, we’re at a competitive disadvantage,” said Julie Peterson, a spokeswoman for the University of Michigan, where two-thirds of the applicants are from out of state.

Since most of Michigan is overwhelmingly white, said Mary Sue Coleman, the university’s president, a plan guaranteeing admission to a percentage of top high school graduates would have little impact, and nothing short of affirmative action will maintain the university’s racial diversity.

“Of course, you want to look at family income, and being the first in the family to attend college and those kinds of factors, of course we do that, but it doesn’t get us to a racially diverse student body,” Dr. Coleman said.

At the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, a program guaranteeing that low-income students can graduate debt-free helped to increase the percentage of blacks in the freshman class to 12 percent, and to increase both economic diversity and the enrollment of underrepresented minority students. Other states have started similar programs.

In Detroit, Wayne State University Law School recently adopted a new admissions policy. Jonathan Weinberg, the professor assigned last year to draft a contingency policy, looked at other states with race-blind admissions and found that instead of race, they look to “a set of broader diversity concerns that go to socioeconomic status.”

Last month, the faculty adopted his policy, eliminating any mention of race, but broadening the factors the admissions office may consider. Those include being the first in the family to go to college or graduate school; having overcome substantial obstacles, including prejudice and discrimination; being multilingual; and residence abroad, in Detroit or on an Indian reservation.

Frank Wu, the law school’s dean, said Wayne State’s effort to comply with the law could bring a legal challenge.

“There’s a new fight building,” Mr. Wu said, “and that’s going to be whether the mere fact that you’re striving for diversity means you’re somehow trying to get around the ban and find proxies, or pretexts, for race, and that that’s impermissible. It’s ironic, but in some quarters our effort to adopt a new policy to comply with Prop 2 has been interpreted as an effort to circumvent it.”

Roger Clegg, president of the Council for Equal Opportunity, which opposes racial preferences, said policies like Wayne State’s do raise questions.

“I have a real problem when schools adopt what on their face are race-neutral criteria, if they are doing so to reach a predetermined racial and ethnic goal,” Mr. Clegg said. “Both in law and in common sense, the motivation matters.”

At Ohio State University, where admissions are increasingly selective, officials are looking for a long-term answer. “When we saw what was coming down the road, we started looking to other models, but no other model results in as much diversity,” said Mabel Freeman, assistant vice president at Ohio State. “The only long-term solution is to do better in the pipeline and make sure all kids get the best education possible, K-12.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/01/26/education/26affirm.html?pagewanted=1&ei=5094&en=ff8555b301a8c973&hp&ex=1169874000&partner=homepage
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Statistic on January 26, 2007, 07:13:56 AM
With all the black on black crime, one nukka can't take out Ward Connerly?
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: dat_raw_n_tellect on January 26, 2007, 11:13:17 PM
Got another one for ya'll... ;)

and this one I can definitely somewhat relate to as a dark-skin sista!  Since I was a child I have always gotten, "Wow your pretty for a dark girl..." :-\  But never expected that this attitude could potentially affect one's earning power:



Study says skin tone affects earnings By TRAVIS LOLLER, Associated Press Writer
Fri Jan 26, 11:01 PM ET
 


Light-skinned immigrants in the United States make more money on average than those with darker complexions, and the chief reason appears to be discrimination, a researcher says.

Joni Hersch, a law and economics professor at Vanderbilt University, looked at a government survey of 2,084 legal immigrants to the United States from around the world and found that those with the lightest skin earned an average of 8 percent to 15 percent more than similar immigrants with much darker skin.

"On average, being one shade lighter has about the same effect as having an additional year of education," Hersch said.

The study also found that taller immigrants earn more than shorter ones, with an extra inch of height associated with a 1 percent increase in income.

Other researchers said the findings are consistent with other studies on color and point to a skin-tone prejudice that goes beyond race.

Hersch took into consideration other factors that could affect wages, such as English-language proficiency, education, occupation, race or country of origin, and found that skin tone still seemed to make a difference in earnings.

That means that if two similar immigrants from Bangladesh, for example, came to the United States at the same time, with the same occupation and ability to speak English, the lighter-skinned immigrant would make more money on average.

"I thought that once we controlled for race and nationality, I expected the difference to go away, but even with people from the same country, the same race — skin color really matters," she said, "and height."

Although many cultures show a bias toward lighter skin, Hersch said her analysis shows that the skin-color advantage was not due to preferential treatment for light-skinned people in their country of origin. The bias, she said, occurs in the U.S.

Economics professor Shelley White-Means of the University of Tennessee at Memphis said the study adds to the growing body of evidence that there is a "preference for whiteness" in America that goes beyond race.

Hersch drew her data from a 2003 federal survey of nearly 8,600 new immigrants. The survey used an 11-point scale for measuring skin tone, in which 0 represents an absence of color and 10 the darkest possible skin tone.

From those nearly 8,600 participants, she focused on the more than 2,000 who were working and whose skin tone had been recorded during face-to-face interviews.

William Darity Jr., an economics professor at the University of North Carolina, said Hersch's findings are similar to a study he co-authored last year on skin tone and wages among blacks.

"We estimate that dark- or medium-skinned blacks suffered a discriminatory penalty of anywhere from 10 percent to 15 percent relative to whites," he said. "This suggests people cue into appearance and draw inferences about capabilities and skills based on how they look."

Darity said it is not clear whether the bias is conscious or subconscious.

Hersch said her findings, which will be presented at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science next month in San Francisco, could support discrimination lawsuits based not on race, but on color.

"There are very few color discrimination suits, but they are on the rise," she said. "But these suits can be hard to prove."

(SUBS graf 6 to correct name spelling, Hersch sted Hersh. )

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070127/ap_on_re_us/skin_tone_income

Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: jarhead on January 27, 2007, 08:14:53 AM
conflicted...'could mean more of us get into the Ivy's
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: jarhead on January 27, 2007, 08:40:20 AM
WASHINGTON — Barack Obama's entry into politics came on a winter morning at the white-columned Harvard Law Review building when, about 2 a.m., a deeply divided editorial staff chose him as the first African American to lead the prestigious publication.

It was no small accomplishment. Obama, who at nearly 30 was older and more world-wise than most of his classmates, had to navigate among sharply drawn factions of conservatives and liberals to beat 18 other candidates for the job.

Today, Obama's weighing of a bid for the White House has provoked questions about whether he has the experience to build a winning coalition of voters. But at Harvard Law Review he showed that — on a much smaller scale — he had the savvy to maneuver through turbulent political waters.

"The Harvard Law Review was a place of petty and vicious internal politics," said Brad Berenson, an editorial board member with Obama and, more recently, an associate counsel to President Bush.

"Compared to Washington and the White House and the Supreme Court, the Harvard Law Review was much more politically vicious," Berenson said. "The conservatives threw their support to Obama because he could bridge the gap between both camps and retain the trust and confidence of both."

Whether Obama can reprise his role as political bridge-builder remains to be seen. Now a Democratic U.S. senator from Illinois, he plans to announce a decision Feb. 10 about the 2008 campaign — though most observers believe that he is in the race.

The son of a racially mixed marriage, Obama did not present himself at Harvard as either a black candidate or a white candidate. He gained the respect of the law review's famously divided factions by listening to all sides.

Former staffer Michael Froman, now a corporate executive who has supported Democratic presidential candidates, agreed that when Obama led the law review in 1990 and 1991, much of the staff's right wing "felt comfortable" with Obama, even those in the conservative Federalist Society.

"It's funny," Froman said, "but it's the same thing I hear now from some conservative friends of mine — not that they agree with him on policy, but that they feel he hears them out. Unlike some of the firebrands on both the left and the right, he was just a very good listener."

Interviews with more than a dozen people associated with the law review, both liberals and conservatives, found no one who did not profess respect for Obama.

The law review was housed in a three-story Greek Revival structure that once had been a private home. The Harvard Legal Aid Bureau occupied the first floor, leaving the cluttered upper stories for the review. The top level, or attic, became the review's law library, its desks and tomes stacked under the sloping roof. The house invoked chaos.

Obama entered that disheveled world in the fall of 1988, already distinct from most of his classmates.

He did not come to Cambridge, Mass., directly from an undergraduate program; he had spent several years doing community work in Chicago. He was not among the privileged or Ivy League legacies. He had turned down a full-ride scholarship at New York University School of Law to attend Harvard. Classmate Cassandra Butts remembers first meeting Obama at the financial aid office.

Nor did Obama arrive with little life experience. He was born in Hawaii, lived in Indonesia and later attended college in Los Angeles and New York. He had also traveled to Africa in search of his father's roots in Kenya.

In his first year, he researched articles for the Harvard Civil Rights-Civil Liberties Law Review. He occasionally spoke out against apartheid in South Africa. He addressed a banquet for the Black Law Students Assn.

Professor Randall Kennedy recalled Obama's theme: Don't forget where you came from.

Classmate Tynia Richard called the speech "one of the most rousing and passionate addresses we heard."

"Harvard was one of those places that can get petty politically," said Richard, now a New York administrative law judge. "People put forth their own agendas, stretched and pressed their ideas in a variety of different ways.

"And he talked about the need to interact with different groups, to become engaged with one another."

After students' first year in law school, they compete for spots on the law review. They are selected by editors based on their writing and analytical skills. Each year, about 40 students in a class of 540 win spots on the review. Each winter the editors, second- and third-year students, gather to choose a president for the following year.

Obama competed in a field of 19 candidates, four of whom were black.

By tradition, the candidates spend the day cooking meals for the voters. After breakfast, the kitchen table is piled high with law articles the candidates have worked on. The articles are reviewed, and votes taken. As the day wears on, eliminated candidates join editors at the kitchen table for the next meal and round of voting.

In Obama's case, the staff of about 80 conducted a marathon series of votes stretching about 17 hours. It was well past midnight when Obama finally bested David Goldberg.

"He was not a conventional politician," said Goldberg, now a civil rights lawyer in New York. "He was thoughtful, and he listens. People came to appreciate that."

Goldberg added, "I was happy to lose to him. I really wanted to be the articles editor."

Kenneth W. Mack, now a law professor at Harvard, said Obama stood out from the beginning. "He seemed more mature," Mack said. "Everyone understood he was a liberal. He didn't hide that.

"We had opinions, and we argued. But he was always able to make common ground," Mack said.

Under Obama's presidency, the review tackled several delicate racial issues, including allegations that black males, or "invisible men," were inadequately protected by civil rights laws, and the plight of black women giving birth to crack-addicted babies.

The review also panned a biography by a white writer about former slave and abolitionist Frederick Douglass, saying not enough blacks were quoted.

Obama too was criticized at the time. Christine Lee Spurell, a black classmate who is now a public defender in Abingdon, Va., was upset he did not name other blacks to the law review's masthead.

But today she believes he was trying to build the best staff. "He had to make hard decisions," she said. "And he made them correctly."
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: One Step Ahead on February 06, 2007, 07:28:30 PM
Texas, Connecticut Battle Over Birthplace of Burger
Posted Wed, Jan 17, 2007, 9:32 am PST
POST A COMMENT »
Don't mess with Texas.

A state legislator there is embroiled in a burger battle with Louis' Lunch of New Haven, Connecticut, over which state can claim to be the birthplace of the hamburger.

Louis' Lunch, which opened in 1895, claims to have come up with the marvelous idea in 1900, when a hurried customer requested something he could eat on the run. Republican state representative Betty Brown, however, has proposed a resolution in the Texas legislature declaring Athens, Texas, as rightful birthing ground, noting that Fletcher Davis sold burgers from a luncheonette there in the late 1800s.

Things have gotten heated. Says New Haven mayor John DeStefano Jr.:

"It's a well-known and established fact that New Haven is the home of the hamburger. In fact, New Haven's claim to the hamburger is even supported and documented in the Library of Congress."
In our own research (admittedly web-based), we found yet another city calling itself the home of the burger: Seymour, Wisconsin. There, in 1895, it's said that "Hamburger" Charlie Nagreen started selling the mighty meaty sandwich. (Here's AHT's History of the Hamburger post.)

This is a debate that will never be resolved, we think, only because there seems to be scant hard evidence as to who and when invented the burger as we know it.

Texas lawmaker challenges burger history [Wilkes-Barre Times-Leader]

 
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on February 06, 2007, 08:20:27 PM
Lol.  I saw that too.  Despite my love of burgers, and despite having been in New Haven over 1.5 years, I still haven't been to Louis' Lunch.  Yankee Doodle is just so good.  Maybe I'll go this week.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Statistic on February 06, 2007, 08:37:36 PM
One of those burger places in NH was in GQ's (I think) best burgers in America and was featured on Oprah. The one that serves it on regular bread and frowns on the use of condiments.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on February 06, 2007, 09:05:48 PM
Yeah that's Louis' Lunch.  Yankee Doodle is the one that puts butter on everything (and I mean everything).  Disgusting in theory; delicious in fact.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Statistic on February 06, 2007, 09:12:15 PM
fatty
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on February 06, 2007, 09:39:08 PM
Yeah, can't eat at the Doodle too often.  But people will go there and get 2 cheeseburgers, a pig (hot dog stuffed with cheese on a bun...with butter), a milkshake, AND a grilled doughnut (with butter, of course).  smh
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: One Step Ahead on February 06, 2007, 09:50:57 PM
1 coronary artery disease and potential-heart-attack to go please!
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Statistic on February 06, 2007, 09:53:46 PM
my God that sounds... fattening.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: LadyKD on February 07, 2007, 06:56:32 AM
Since we were talking hamburgers and calories here is a burger for you....

How about a Krispy Kreme hamburger?
Minor-league club offers 1,000-calorie sandwich with cheese, bacon, donuts.



The minor-league team Gateway Grizzlies of the Frontier League will begin selling a concessions item that is not for the calorie-conscious, ESPN reported.

"Baseball's Best Burger," as the Grizzlies call it, will consist of a hamburger topped with cheddar cheese and two slices of bacon — all between a "bun" made of a sliced Krispy Kreme Original Glazed donut.

The burger is not for the faint of heart — literally — and will contain roughly 1,000 calories and 45 grams of fat.

We have had the opportunity to bring in a new concession item for the past two seasons and each of them have been very successful," Grizzlies general manager Tony Funderburg told ESPN.

Funderburg, who said he has eaten at least 10 of the creations, claims he got the idea after reading about a restaurant in Atlanta with a similar sandwich, ESPN reported.
 
Funderberg said the team hopes to sell 100 to 200 of them a night at $4.50 each. The burger will only be available inside the stadium gates, according to ESPN.



Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Statistic on February 07, 2007, 07:00:06 AM
1k calories? damn
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on February 07, 2007, 07:06:50 AM
Yeah, I've wanted to try that for quite some time now.  Two of my favorites junk foods together.  I have to try it at least once (after and before a week of nothing but healthy foods).

I also want to try the Coca-Cola funnel cake.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: pikey on February 07, 2007, 07:15:33 AM
Yeah, I've wanted to try that for quite some time now.  Two of my favorites junk foods together.  I have to try it at least once (after and before a week of nothing but healthy foods).

I also want to try the Coca-Cola funnel cake.

That kk burger sounds disgusting.  So does a grilled dougnut with butter.  What happened to a regular old cheesburger with lettuce tomato and fried onions?
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: LadyKD on February 07, 2007, 07:24:14 AM
Yeah, I've wanted to try that for quite some time now.  Two of my favorites junk foods together.  I have to try it at least once (after and before a week of nothing but healthy foods).

I also want to try the Coca-Cola funnel cake.

The Krispy Kreme burger looks pretty easy to assemble, the doughnut is cut in half, cook the burger, melt cheese on it, add bacon,slap it between the doughnut halves and there you go. I saw the news story back on CBS this past summer. 
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on February 07, 2007, 07:35:18 AM
Yeah, I've wanted to try that for quite some time now.  Two of my favorites junk foods together.  I have to try it at least once (after and before a week of nothing but healthy foods).

I also want to try the Coca-Cola funnel cake.

That kk burger sounds disgusting.  So does a grilled dougnut with butter.  What happened to a regular old cheesburger with lettuce tomato and fried onions?

That's what the Doodle's regular cheeseburger is...just with butter.  Believe me, it tastes better, health consequences aside.  And since you're already eating a cheeseburger...
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: pikey on February 07, 2007, 07:46:17 AM
Yeah, I've wanted to try that for quite some time now.  Two of my favorites junk foods together.  I have to try it at least once (after and before a week of nothing but healthy foods).

I also want to try the Coca-Cola funnel cake.

That kk burger sounds disgusting.  So does a grilled dougnut with butter.  What happened to a regular old cheesburger with lettuce tomato and fried onions?

That's what the Doodle's regular cheeseburger is...just with butter.  Believe me, it tastes better, health consequences aside.  And since you're already eating a cheeseburger...

Cheeseburger isn't that bad for you.  It's the fries and milkshake combined with the burger that really do you in.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: jarhead on February 07, 2007, 02:16:30 PM
Yeah, I've wanted to try that for quite some time now.  Two of my favorites junk foods together.  I have to try it at least once (after and before a week of nothing but healthy foods).

I also want to try the Coca-Cola funnel cake.

The Krispy Kreme burger looks pretty easy to assemble, the doughnut is cut in half, cook the burger, melt cheese on it, add bacon,slap it between the doughnut halves and there you go. I saw the news story back on CBS this past summer. 



gross
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: jarhead on February 19, 2007, 03:01:09 PM
For those of us discussing unions a while back.




A Simple Fact and a Stubborn Union

By Warren Brown
Sunday, February 18, 2007; Page G02

Corporations are not eleemosynary institutions. They do not exist for the public's welfare. They are not churches. They are driven more by greed than altruism.

That is not a criticism. It's a fact. It's neither good nor bad. It is what it is.
 
Grasping that fact is something the United Auto Workers union has failed to do, and that's too bad. Had the UAW understood and accepted the intrinsic nature of corporations, it and its members would not be in the position they're in today -- lamenting the decision of German-owned DaimlerChrysler to cut 13,000 jobs and shutter all or part of four Chrysler Group plants in North America over the next three years.

It is a decision about money, and the Chrysler Group has been losing way too much of it -- $1.5 billion in 2006 alone.

That's peanuts in comparison with the $12.7 billion lost by Ford in 2006 and the $10.6 billion lost by General Motors in 2005. But the Chrysler Group is no GM or Ford. By comparison, it's a corporate midget with a substantially lower tolerance for financial losses.

Moreover, it's not an independent corporation. It's an American division of a larger German company funded by German banks that, over the years, have become increasingly restive about Chrysler's poor financial performance. The banks have had enough, and they are putting pressure on DaimlerChrysler executives to do something about the corporation's wayward American acquisition, which has been a pain in the pocketbook since it was taken over by the Germans in 1998.

This is what the UAW does not appear to comprehend. Thus, in response to the latest bad Chrysler news, it sends forth its president and DaimlerChrysler Department director, respectively Ron Gettelfinger and General Holiefield, to decry the "devastating news for thousands of workers, their families and their communities."

The two continued in the joint statement: "While Chrysler Group's recent losses are not the fault of UAW members, they will suffer because of the reductions" announced by DaimlerChrysler's chief executive, Dieter Zetsche.

Say what?

Granted, it wasn't the UAW's idea to keep rolling out trucks -- and the wrong trucks at that, full-size pickups with underpowered V-6 engines -- when a lot of America was looking for fuel-efficient automobiles. It wasn't the UAW's idea to keep stockpiling those unwanted models until they had to be dumped on the marketplace at fire-sale prices.

But UAW members made those trucks, and they were paid handsomely for making them -- more handsomely than workers in Alabama are being paid for making hot-selling Hyundai Sonata cars, as handsomely as workers at Toyota's U.S. plants are being paid for making popular Camry cars and Tundra pickups, and as handsomely as employees of Honda in America are being paid for making fast-selling Civic and Accord automobiles.

That's a problem. It's a money problem. When you're getting paid as much as someone who is making popular, profitable products, and you're making unpopular and unprofitable products, that's a really serious problem. Something's got to give, and more than likely it is going to be your job and your plant, and maybe your company.

It's business. And contrary to claims by Gettelfinger and Holiefield, it really has nothing to do with "our nation's ill-conceived trade policies."

Americans are buying Toyota cars made by Americans in America. Americans are buying Hyundai cars made by Americans in America. Americans are buying Honda cars, Nissan cars, Mercedes-Benz and BMW cars -- all made by Americans in America.

Chrysler's American losses are those Americans' gain. It has nothing to do with trade. It has everything to do with what is selling and what isn't, what is perceived as having value and what isn't. It also has much to do with the outstanding fact that Americans at those Toyota, Honda, Nissan, Hyundai, BMW and Mercedes-Benz plants, for whatever reason, have seen no value in joining the UAW.

Again, it's business. It comes down to money. Consumers don't drive flags. They drive cars. If they believe a car has good value for dollar, then that is the car they buy. If they don't see that value, they don't buy. Their purchase decisions aren't based on what is good for the community, or the country, or the UAW. In that regard, they are much like corporations. They are in it for the money.


Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on February 19, 2007, 03:21:17 PM
Also on unions:

Apple CEO lambasts teacher unions
APRIL CASTRO
Associated Press

AUSTIN - Apple Inc. CEO Steve Jobs lambasted teacher unions Friday, claiming no amount of technology in the classroom would improve public schools until principals could fire bad teachers.

Jobs compared schools to businesses with principals serving as CEOs.

"What kind of person could you get to run a small business if you told them that when they came in they couldn't get rid of people that they thought weren't any good?" he asked to loud applause during an education reform conference.

"Not really great ones because if you're really smart you go, 'I can't win.'"

In a rare joint appearance, Jobs shared the stage with competitor Michael Dell, founder and CEO of Dell Inc. Both spoke to the gathering about the potential for bringing technological advances to classrooms.

"I believe that what is wrong with our schools in this nation is that they have become unionized in the worst possible way," Jobs said.

"This unionization and lifetime employment of K-12 teachers is off-the-charts crazy."

At various pauses, the audience applauded enthusiastically. Dell sat quietly with his hands folded in his lap.

"Apple just lost some business in this state, I'm sure," Jobs said.

Dell responded that unions were created because "the employer was treating his employees unfairly and that was not good.

"So now you have these enterprises where they take good care of their people. The employees won, they do really well and succeed."

Dell also blamed problems in public schools on the lack of a competitive job market for principals.

Earlier in the panel discussion, Jobs told the crowd about his vision for textbook-free schools in the future. Textbooks would be replaced with a free, online information source that was constantly updated by experts, much like the online encyclopedia Wikipedia.

"I think we'd have far more current material available to our students and we'd be freeing up a tremendous amount of funds that we could buy delivery vehicles with - computers, faster Internet, things like that," Jobs said. "And I also think we'd get some of the best minds in the country contributing."
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on February 19, 2007, 03:24:52 PM
That's a problem. It's a money problem. When you're getting paid as much as someone who is making popular, profitable products, and you're making unpopular and unprofitable products, that's a really serious problem. Something's got to give, and more than likely it is going to be your job and your plant, and maybe your company.

...

Again, it's business. It comes down to money. Consumers don't drive flags. They drive cars. If they believe a car has good value for dollar, then that is the car they buy. If they don't see that value, they don't buy. Their purchase decisions aren't based on what is good for the community, or the country, or the UAW. In that regard, they are much like corporations. They are in it for the money.

Amen.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: jarhead on February 19, 2007, 03:37:08 PM
unions are responsible for the loss of jobs to mexico and asia as far as im concerned. it seems they dont care if the plant closes as long as the last guy who turns out the lights is a union member and gets union wages.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on February 19, 2007, 03:40:25 PM
It's understandable to act in one's self-interest.  Unions just don't know how to draw the line between short-term and long-term self-interest.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: jarhead on February 19, 2007, 03:48:48 PM
well yeah but when you drive up the cost of doing business so much that its cheaper for a corporation to leave the country and go over seas, you can't turn around and complain that all the jobs went over seas.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on February 19, 2007, 03:53:07 PM
True.  They don't get my sympathy.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: jarhead on February 22, 2007, 09:37:48 AM
Eddie Murphy's Plus-Size Offense

By DeNeen L. Brown
Washington Post Staff Writer
Wednesday, February 21, 2007; Page C01

She is wearing a hot pink nightie fringed by tiny hot pink feathers. Her big, brown legs are polished and wrap around the man lying beneath her. Her makeup is perfect. She turns toward the camera and seemingly growls.

The man lying beneath her, Eddie Murphy, seems to struggle under her weight with a horrified look. The two of them lie on the word "Norbit," crushing the movie title, making it sag like a well-worn mattress.
 
Above them, the ad asks: "Have you ever made a really big mistake?"

The poster is supposed to invite laughs. But for a number of women, black and otherwise, it's not funny.

In recent years, Hollywood has begun to make some changes in its portrayal and acceptance of black beauty. So you wonder why at this point does it release a film that stereotypes and makes fun of big black women? You wonder who is laughing.

Murphy co-wrote the story and screenplay for "Norbit," about a meek nerd, played by Murphy. Norbit is chased by his obsessed, jealous and overbearing wife, Rasputia, also played by Murphy (in a fat suit). The movie, No. 1 at the box office when it opened two weekends ago, drew harsh reviews from film critics and a series of protests from women and men who found it to be misogynistic and an outrageous characterization of large black women.

Geneva Mays, a real estate agent who lives in Suitland, says she is offended by the movie trailers that show the character Rasputia flying though her bedroom and landing on Norbit, crushing the bed in the fall. "I think it's demeaning to women," Mays said. "I think it's demeaning to women in general because we are all the same. We are just different colors. Women are women, regardless."

Thandisizwe Chimurenga, a community activist, said the movie shows how society feels about large black women. "I'm a big woman myself," she said. The irony, she said, "is there are a lot of men who do like large women. I've been pursued by all kinds of men." She added: "The billboards to me look cute. I was, like, 'Go ahead, girl, do your thing."

Sitting two rows from the back of the theater at Laurel Cinema 6, Tamara Taylor, a certified medical technician who lives in Baltimore, laughed at some scenes in "Norbit." She had come for herself to see the movie to understand it better. Afterward, Taylor decided it wasn't the character's size that made her ugly.

"Rasputia, I think she was funny as far as being jealous, but she was abusive. That made her ugly," Taylor said. "At first, I thought he was intimidated by her size, but he was really intimidated by her ways, her mouth. . . . I think Norbit liked the other girl because she was soft and frail. I think he loved Kate," played by Thandie Newton, "not because she was small, but she was peaceful."

Some found that the juxtaposition of the two women conjures old questions about skin color and beauty (Kate being lighter skinned than Rasputia), about the light and dark images that haunt so many races and the fairy tales that imply the more fair the complexion, the more beautiful the woman.

"I find it vaguely irritating how Eddie Murphy is given free [rein] to depict the cliched, overbearing, domineering black woman without any complaints," wrote a blogger on Salon.com. "Hell, I'm white, and even I'm offended by this depiction. Where's the outrage at this inside the black community. Am I the only one who finds a mammy-esque element in Rasputia?"


In California, activist Najee Ali led a protest of the movie and called upon Murphy to apologize.

"Eddie Murphy's character, we feel, is offensive to African American women and it perpetuates those negative stereotypes that large black women are violent, unattractive, promiscuous and buffoons," Ali said. "There was not one positive trait that character portrayed. He gave no balance to his role."
 
He said, "When you juxtapose his portrayal of large, black women with Tyler Perry's portrayal or even Martin Lawrence, those actors played large black women, but their characters were warm and loving to their families and communities."

The ad campaign is damaging to the black community, he said, and to have the movie released during Black History Month was disrespectful. Ali, executive director of Project Islamic Hope, an advocacy group for social justice and civil rights, said the protest was organized by black men to help defend black women. "Beauty and talent among African American women come in all shapes and forms, from full-figured women such as Aretha Franklin and Jill Scott."

Murphy, who has been nominated for an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor in "Dreamgirls," has not responded to the demand for an apology, Ali said.

A publicist for Murphy said last night, "We have no comment on that issue."

In one scene in the movie, Rasputia lies poolside in a bikini, her large belly overlapping her pink bottoms, her breasts spilling over. She is drinking an Icee and talking to Kate, who lies there in a blue, well-fitting bikini.

"You too damned skinny," Rasputia says to the skinny Kate. "Look at you! See, most men like a woman that got a little 'mmm, mmm,' a little hey, hey. You ain't got nothing. You just skin and bones, just sitting in that chair all bones and skin. I feel sorry for you."

And as she speaks there is a tiny moment of realization that Rasputia has a healthy self-image. And, secretly, her large ego is refreshing and in some ways matches psychological studies that show black women generally have a higher acceptance of higher body weight than other women.

Larger black women in African American communities are often celebrated. Shapeliness is something to be adored.

"It is actually somewhat surprising that African American women continue to have a high body image even though the standards of the dominant cultural forces point toward more European standards. The ultimate blond-haired, blue-eyed, 5-10, thin white woman has for many years been the standard off of which all other beauty was based, judged and validated," according to a report released by Vanderbilt University's psychology department.

Some women look at the billboard and celebrate Rasputia's beauty, knowing that even if she lost weight, she would never meet the expectations of a culture that looks to the 5-foot-10 blond, blue-eyed standard of beauty. Knowing that if you looked hard enough, you could find ugly in a 5-10 blue-eyed blond woman. Ugly, we know, lies beneath the skin.

And you wonder how long will it take for this country to accept beauty in all its forms. Then you watch "The Last King of Scotland," and see a white man fall in love with a black woman who has no European features, and you walk away hopeful that others in the audience will also see the real beauty in black women whose features are not pointed.

Then you look around and you find change: Ads for Dove soap, part of a worldwide campaign changing the definition of beauty, feature "real women with real bodies and real curves." Women of all sizes in white underwear smile from billboards. And more examples: "American Idol" contender Jennifer Hudson is on the cover of Vogue. And actress Queen Latifah is a Cover Girl. And supermodel Tyra Banks says she is happy with her new weight, and tells the paparazzi and whoever called her fat to "kiss my fat [expletive]."

And you look at the "Norbit" ad one more time and laugh.


Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Statistic on February 22, 2007, 10:05:16 AM
Eh. I was annoyed by this quote: ""There was not one positive trait that character portrayed. He gave no balance to his role.""

that was the point! Essentially, they are getting mad at Eddie for making the woman a villain. Can't big black women be the villain? I understand their argument to the extent that they resent her weight alone being made the fodder for quips. But, their argument is so broad that if any one big black women were the target of unsympathetic portrayals, it seems as though they would have a problem with it.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: jarhead on February 22, 2007, 10:36:36 AM
well i think the movie says more about Eddie's colorstruckness (if thats a word) im light skinned w/ light eyes so and i abhor people constantly clinging to the slavish light skin dark skin thing....but if you go back through his movies this is a constant theme....all the desirable women are light bright almost white. i can't believe i just said that but you know what i mean. he seems to always big up the women who's toes are dangling over the you can still tell she's black line....although i do love me some Thandie Newton...and she's got an accent.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: cui bono? on February 22, 2007, 03:09:53 PM
well i think the movie says more about Eddie's colorstruckness (if thats a word) im light skinned w/ light eyes so and i abhor people constantly clinging to the slavish light skin dark skin thing....but if you go back through his movies this is a constant theme....all the desirable women are light bright almost white. i can't believe i just said that but you know what i mean. he seems to always big up the women who's toes are dangling over the you can still tell she's black line....although i do love me some Thandie Newton...and she's got an accent.

as a lightskinned person myself, I never even noticed that.  But now that I think of it, you're right he does always use "lightbrights" in all of his movies.  Not just this and those doolittle garbage movies but taking it waaay back to Coming to America with that soap opera chick.   

What about that vampire one...i didnt see that.   
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: LadyKD on February 22, 2007, 03:32:55 PM
Eddie's ex-wife was a little on the light bright side too.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: LadyKD on February 22, 2007, 05:16:17 PM
Crap like this does not help....

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RDfggrz5uF4
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: mr*mouth*piece on February 22, 2007, 05:20:20 PM
I think you can always find the negative when you look for it.  Najee Ali....its amazing to me how he always comes out to protest movies by African-Americans but he is silent when it comes to movies by non African-Americans that show African-Americans in a negative light.  I'm curious what the comedian Monique's take is on the movie.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: mr*mouth*piece on February 22, 2007, 05:24:24 PM
Mayhem Main Event at NBA All-Star Weekend
'Police Were Simply Overwhelmed' in Sin City
By JASON WHITLOCK
AOL
Sports Commentary

LAS VEGAS -- NBA All-Star Weekend in Vegas was an unmitigated failure, and any thoughts of taking the extravaganza to New Orleans in 2008 are total lunacy.


NBA's Big Weekend


An event planned to showcase what is right about professional basketball has been turned into a 72-hour display of why commissioner David Stern can't sleep at night and spends his days thinking of rules to mask what the NBA has come to represent.

Good luck fixing All-Star Weekend.

The game is a sloppy, boring, half-hearted mess. The dunk contest is contrived and pointless. The celebrity contest is unintended comedy. And, worst of all, All-Star Weekend revelers have transformed the league's midseason exhibition into the new millennium Freaknik, an out-of-control street party that features gunplay, violence, non-stop weed smoke and general mayhem.

Word of all the criminal activity that transpired during All-Star Weekend has been slowly leaking out on Las Vegas radio shows and TV newscasts and on Internet blogs the past 24 hours.

"It was filled with an element of violence," Teresa Frey, general manager for Coco's restaurant, told klastv.com. "They don't want to pay their bills. They don't want to respect us or each other."

Things got so bad that she closed the 24-hour restaurant from 2 a.m. to 4 a.m.

"I have been spit on. I have had food thrown at me," she said. "I have lost two servers out of fear. I have locked my door out of the fear of violence."

All weekend, people, especially cab drivers, gossiped about brawls and shootings. You didn't know what to believe because the local newspaper was filled with stories about what a raging success All-Star Weekend was. The city is desperately trying to attract an NBA franchise, and, I guess, there was no reason to let a few bloody bodies get in the way of a cozy relationship with Stern.


Plus, the NBA's business partner ESPN didn't have time to dirty its hands and report on the carnage. I'm sure ESPN's reporters were embedded in the rear ends of the troops -- Shaq, Kobe, King James, D-Wade, AI and Melo.

But there were multiple brawls, at least two shootings, more than 350 arrests and a lot of terror in Vegas over the weekend.

And the police might want to talk to NFL player Pacman Jones about a nasty shooting spree at a Vegas strip club. Jones and the rapper Nelly were allegedly at Minxx Gentlemen's Club Monday morning shortly before (or during) the shooting.

Two victims, male employees of the club, were listed in critical condition at the hospital; a third, a female patron, sustained non-life threatening injuries after being grazed by a bullet.

There were so many fights and so many gangbangers and one parking-lot shootout at the MGM Grand that people literally fled the hotel in fear for their safety. I talked with a woman who moved from the MGM to the Luxor because "I couldn't take it. I'll never come back to another All-Star Game."

There are reports of a brawl between rappers and police at the Wynn Hotel.

Vegas police were simply overwhelmed along The Strip. They were there solely for decoration and to discourage major crimes. Beyond that, they minded their own business.

I was there. Walking The Strip this weekend must be what it feels like to walk the yard at a maximum security prison. You couldn't relax. You avoided eye contact. The heavy police presence only reminded you of the danger.

Without a full-scale military occupation, New Orleans will not survive All-Star Weekend 2008.

David Stern seriously needs to consider moving the event out of the country for the next couple of years in hopes that young, hip-hop hoodlums would find another event to terrorize. Taking the game to Canada won't do it. The game needs to be moved overseas, someplace where the Bloods and Crips and hookers and hoes can't get to it without a passport and plane ticket.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: mr*mouth*piece on February 22, 2007, 05:28:32 PM
To me it has a lot of racial overtones.  What's amazing about this article is that it was written by a black man.  I wonder what the increase in crime is like for the superbowl, the world series, stanley cup finals, and the world cup.  The difference between all-star weekend and those other events that I mentioned is the racial make-up.  The "baby mama on tax refund vacation"  was totally out of line.  On a side note, what did they expect to happen,the host city's nickname is "sin city?" 
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Statistic on February 22, 2007, 05:41:29 PM
i dont like whitlock. he's a female dog.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on February 22, 2007, 06:16:57 PM
It does get crazy though.  I remember when it was in ATL a few years ago.  Even then, people were saying it was the wildest they'd seen since the end of freaknik.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: jarhead on February 22, 2007, 07:03:09 PM
freaknik's over??? damn i'm outta the loop
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: LadyKD on February 22, 2007, 07:07:46 PM
Jarhead there has not been a freaknik in many moons. I thought the biker weekend became the new version of freaknik
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: jarhead on February 22, 2007, 07:10:44 PM
i dont know, i never did any of that ish....
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Statistic on February 22, 2007, 07:12:28 PM
too light?
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: jarhead on February 22, 2007, 07:14:40 PM
naw n word  :D, i don't like driving long distances to try and pick up some hoes there's plenty of hoes right where im at...
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Eugene Young on February 22, 2007, 09:15:36 PM
i dont like whitlock. he's a female dog.
titcr
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: pikey on February 23, 2007, 12:47:05 PM
I was quite dissapointed when I arrived in Atl for undergrad, only to discover that Freaknik had ended a year or two before I got there.  I wanted to go to Freaknik ever since I saw that Sista Sista episode where Tia and Tamera went and Mya and Blackstreet performed "Take Me There"!  :D 
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Statistic on February 23, 2007, 12:51:57 PM
You watched Sister Sister? tsk tsk  :(
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: pikey on February 23, 2007, 12:53:59 PM
You watched Sister Sister? tsk tsk  :(

What's wrong with Sister Sister?  I loved that show!  :P
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Stand under my Umbrella ella ella, aye!! on February 23, 2007, 01:37:29 PM
I went to three freakniks.  I have about 200 pictures with some very fine women doing some very outrageuos things.  I even watched one girl get her clothes tore off of her in the Underground by a horny mob of camera weilding men.  I saw alot of crazy ish.  The last year sucked, there were more cops than people. freaknik was out of cotrol. 
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Statistic on February 23, 2007, 01:42:58 PM
You watched Sister Sister? tsk tsk  :(

What's wrong with Sister Sister?  I loved that show!  :P

It was sooo corny.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: LadyKD on February 23, 2007, 04:27:18 PM
Damn Damn Damn DAMN!!!!!


Deval: ‘I really screwed up’ Admits gaffe on Caddy, furniture but defends $72G for wife
By Casey Ross
Boston Herald Reporter
 
Thursday, February 22, 2007 - Updated: 01:07 AM EST


Gov. Deval Patrick yesterday admitted he “really screwed up” by spending tax dollars on a leased Cadillac and high-end office furniture, but he strongly defended the hiring of a $72,000-a-year chief of staff for his wife.

 “Every governor has had staff to help support the work of the office, including the work of the first lady,” Patrick said during an impromptu press conference. “It’s official business.”
 
    However, a Patrick aide could recall only two events Diane Patrick has attended this year, one to promote early education initiatives in the State House and a second to appear at a reading event for children in Springfield.


“Diane Patrick seems like a very nice woman, but she was not elected governor,” said Brian Dodge, executive director of the state’s Republican Party. “Why are taxpayers burdened with a $72,000 expense to make sure she shows up on time to events?”
 
    As questions continued about Patrick’s spending, the administration last night released an itemized list of $27,400 in furniture he bought for his State House office suite. Patrick initially paid for the furniture with taxpayer dollars, then opted to reimburse the state.
 
    The list includes $4,470 for two couches from the luxury retailer Cabot House, $12,300 in draperies from Boston Window Design and $1,650 for a new desk from Oak Hollow Antiques.
 
    Patrick has also agreed to pay $543 per month toward the $1,166 lease of his Cadillac DTS, a sum that covers the difference between the cost of his luxury vehicle and a more modest Ford Crown Victoria that was used by Gov. Romney.
 
    During comments to reporters, Patrick acknowledged he made mistakes on some of his spending decisions, even as he defended the need for quality office furniture.
 
    “Oh yeah, I really screwed up,” Patrick said. “But I receive heads of companies and heads of labor. I receive community groups, members of the Legislature, members of the diplomatic corps. I think the governor’s office should look nice, so I’m prepared to be a BYO governor: bring your own furniture.”
 
    Despite his apology, Patrick told reporters that he was sorry about the spending controversy because it has drawn attention from other business. “I am so sorry that we have all spent the kind of time we have on what we have spent time on, and I’m sorry to have been responsible for that,” he said.
 
    Even as he decried the media’s focus, Patrick said he wants to work with reporters. “It’s very important to me that you in the media help me get the message out about what it is we are concentrating on,” he said. “The municipal partnership package, for example, the budget that’s coming out, the way we’re taking steps to reduce property taxes . . . Unless I get this off your screens, then I don’t think we’re going to get that through.”





Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on February 23, 2007, 05:37:13 PM
This happened early.  No biggie.  And what kind of governor drives a Crown Vic?  I thought they were all driven around in limos/town cars.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Special Agent Dana Scully on February 23, 2007, 05:38:51 PM
I was quite dissapointed when I arrived in Atl for undergrad, only to discover that Freaknik had ended a year or two before I got there.  I wanted to go to Freaknik ever since I saw that Sista Sista episode where Tia and Tamera went and Mya and Blackstreet performed "Take Me There"!  :D 

why in the world would you have wanted to go to freanik??
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Statistic on February 23, 2007, 05:43:22 PM
Maybe she's a freak, nik?  :P
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: LadyKD on February 23, 2007, 06:00:40 PM
He needs better advisors..if Pelosi is getting flack for requesting the bigger plane..you know he is going to catch hell for driving a Caddy.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: jarhead on February 23, 2007, 06:07:25 PM
He needs better advisors..if Pelosi is getting flack for requesting the bigger plane..you know he is going to catch hell for driving a Caddy.


fyi that pelosi story wasn't true...some reporter ran w/ a rumour...
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: LadyKD on February 23, 2007, 06:22:43 PM
fine scratch Pelosi example...How about Dear Negro Gov..Bro you know they are going to go over you and all actions you take. The media will bend you over and give you and your staff a prostate exam with no rubber glove daily. So why you may want to have the nice office...like you had at Coca-Cola, this is the governor's office so CYA and if you do it you damn well better not get caught.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on February 23, 2007, 06:32:50 PM
CYA?
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on February 23, 2007, 06:33:11 PM
And Patrick worked for The Coca-Cola Company?  I like this cat.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: LadyKD on February 23, 2007, 06:34:45 PM
CYA=Cover Your Ass
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on February 23, 2007, 06:38:02 PM
oic
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: LadyKD on February 23, 2007, 06:42:09 PM
From Wikipedia...


In 1997, Patrick returned to Boston to join the firm Day, Berry & Howard, and was appointed by the federal district court to serve as Chairman of the Task Force to oversee implementation of the terms of a race discrimination settlement at Texaco. After serving for nearly two years, he was appointed vice president and general counsel for the company in New York City. From 2000 to 2004, Patrick worked as executive vice president, general counsel, and corporate secretary of the Coca-Cola Company in Atlanta. He resigned in 2004, ending nearly 6 years of weekly commuting between Massachusetts and jobs out of state.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on February 23, 2007, 06:47:32 PM
Yeah, I just read that.  General Counsel of The Coca-Cola Company.  What a guy.  Helping to make the greatest company in America even greater.  I think he's my favorite governor.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: jarhead on February 23, 2007, 07:28:25 PM
LMAO


By MATT SEDENSKY, Associated Press Writer
Fri Feb 23, 6:33 PM ET
 

FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - From the state that brought you the hanging chad, now comes the crying judge. Some members of the bar and other court-watchers are cringing over the way Judge Larry Seidlin wept — no, sobbed — on live, national TV as he announced a ruling Thursday in the dispute over where  Anna Nicole Smith should be buried.

Some are accusing the brash former New York cab driver of showboating for the cameras, or worse, auditioning for his own courtroom TV show, with his one-liners, his personal asides, and his smart-alecky Bronx delivery during the six-day hearing.

They say that he let the hearing drag on way too long, that he made inappropriate jokes for a dispute over a body, that he acted as if it were all about him.

"He's like Judge Judy's wacky little brother," legal analyst Jefrey Toobin quipped on CNN.

The New York Post called him a "Weepy Wacko," while the Daily News asked, "How Low Can This Judge Go?" and referred to him as "Blubbering Seidlin." One of the Miami's most celebrated defense attorneys, Roy Black, said of the circus-like scene in Seidlin's courtroom: "I sort of think it gives circuses a bad name."

Black said he was torn between being entertained as a spectator and being horrified as a legal professional.

"I thought he was one of the most entertaining things I had ever seen. He could be a TV judge. He could be a stand-up comic. However, I think he makes a horrible judge," Black said. "He doesn't follow any of the rules or procedures."

In court, the 56-year-old Seidlin talked about his wife and divulged the minutiae of his days, mentioning his morning swim and the tuna sandwich he was having when assigned the case. He called Dr. Joshua Perper, the medical examiner, "Dr. Pepper." Lawyers became known by their home states of "Texas" or "California." The hearing often became a free-for-all, with the various parties talking at the same time.

On the last day of the hearing, Seidlin cut witnesses off altogether. From the bench, he freely aired his thoughts, including "I feel for you, Mama" to Smith's mother. And just when everyone was ready for testimony to spill into one final day, he issued his ruling.

In the end, though, Black said he agreed with Seidlin's tearful ruling that custody of Smith's body go to the court-appointed lawyer representing her 5-month-old baby, Dannielynn, and he said he thought the judge's emotions were genuine.

"I believe that he sincerely tried to do the right thing," he said. "But while the end result is correct, it made a mockery of the system of justice."

The baby's lawyer ultimately decided to have Smith buried in the Bahamas, which was what Seidlin had fervently wished for from the bench. That decision represented a defeat for Smith's mother, Virgie Arthur, who wanted to bury the starlet in her native Texas.

One of Arthur's attorneys, John O'Quinn, said of the judge: "The entire nation was watching him and so he wanted to do the most bizarre thing he could."

John Thompson, a Coral Gables lawyer, said Seidlin made a mockery of the judicial process.

"If this is how a Circuit Court judge is supposed to act," he said, "then the Florida Supreme Court should issue an order directing that henceforth sitting judges can wear not just robes but rather opt for the clownish outfit of a carnival barker."

Seidlin declined to comment Friday, saying it wouldn't be appropriate. His only hope might be that the whole thing will eventually go away.

"You're all done with me," he said as he prepared to make his ruling Thursday. "I'm not going to talk about this case ever again."

At one point earlier this week, Seidlin rejected some of the characterizations of his courtroom: "There's no circus here, my friend."

Seidlin does have his admirers, too, including the attorneys for Larry Birkhead, one of at least two men who claim to be the father of Smith's baby.

"Sometimes lightening up a little helps everyone relax," said one, Susan Brown.

Eve Preminger, a former New York judge, said Seidlin could have curtailed his comments and held back his feelings, but he shouldn't be criticized so intensely for it.

"I just don't think it's the worst sin a judge could commit," she said. "I'd rather have an overemotional judge who cares than a mean judge who doesn't. We judges are so concerned with our dignity that sometimes we lose sight of the human issues."


 
 

 
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: LadyKD on February 23, 2007, 07:33:46 PM
He called the lawyers Texas and California and he cried in the courtroom...he is from Brooklyn and a ex-cabbie...hmmm Jarhead you still think the south is slow? j/k Black is right this trial was worst than a circus.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on February 23, 2007, 08:01:32 PM
Decorum is bull.  All it does is legitimate the system for laymen.  It's necessary for that reason, but all that really matters is that the right outcome was reached.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: jarhead on February 23, 2007, 08:07:41 PM
lighter topic, ya'll think he killed 'em? i do, i thought that as soon as she turned up dead
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: LadyKD on February 23, 2007, 08:09:20 PM
lighter topic, ya'll think he killed 'em? i do, i thought that as soon as she turned up dead

Who Stern? You think he killed Nicole and her son?
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: jarhead on February 23, 2007, 08:15:54 PM
yes. her son's death was never really explained. when the story broke and they didn't have an immediate cause of death i was like hmmm if they find the same type of circumstances...her son died of an overdose in a hospital maternity ward...who does that? she apparently died from the same mix of drugs. he was the last person present at both scenes. he's fighting the paternity test if you knew that was your kid w/ all that money at stake you would be camped out at the lab. why spend all this time and money going through all this legal crap about who when why for the paternity test unless you know its not your kid? with her and her son dead he has control of that money if she gets it and she probably will.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: LadyKD on February 23, 2007, 08:21:43 PM
Yes but why kill her, she was already attached to him at the hip. So he didnt have to kill her to get his hooks in the cash. He had already gotten her moved to the Bahamas(I hear they have some liberal banking laws there) so why bump her off? Now I do believe that the kid is not his kid, but I dont think it is the other guy's either.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on February 23, 2007, 08:23:28 PM
This would also make a good L&O episode.

Bets on when Britney will successfully killself?
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: LadyKD on February 23, 2007, 08:28:58 PM
You are right and I bet they will write it up too. I dont know what the hell to think of Britney Spears..where are her babies? She is just backwoods hillybilly trash gone wild..what is with shaving her damn head? Poor kids Britney for a mom and Kevin-no job or talent having-Federline. That guy has knocked up two women and has four kids.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: jarhead on February 23, 2007, 08:32:03 PM
Yes but why kill her, she was already attached to him at the hip. So he didnt have to kill her to get his hooks in the cash. He had already gotten her moved to the Bahamas(I hear they have some liberal banking laws there) so why bump her off? Now I do believe that the kid is not his kid, but I dont think it is the other guy's either.


because her will left the money to her son he's dead...you're right he had her in the bahamas and she was probably drugged up most of the time but not enough to where she left the money to him directly. once again if he was the father if she left the money to him you would think it would by default also go to the daughter unless she knew he wasn't the father and thought maybe he wouldn't. i do believe the ex boyfriend is the father otherwise he wouldn't be pushing for DNA so hard. and in the brief glimpes of the trial i did she he seemed to be the only genuine one. the only way he the lawyer could get control of it would be to be the father of the daughter. plus everyone who knew her talk about how leechy he was and if you remember he's the one who announced in a lone press conference that he was the father she never said that he was or he wasn't
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on February 23, 2007, 08:34:56 PM
You are right and I bet they will write it up too. I dont know what the hell to think of Britney Spears..where are her babies? She is just backwoods hillybilly trash gone wild..what is with shaving her damn head? Poor kids Britney for a mom and Kevin-no job or talent having-Federline. That guy has knocked up two women and has four kids.

K-fed has the kids.  I think he's probably the better parent.  Their situation isn't that unique.  Trailer trash with money.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: jarhead on February 23, 2007, 08:35:50 PM
You are right and I bet they will write it up too. I dont know what the hell to think of Britney Spears..where are her babies? She is just backwoods hillybilly trash gone wild..what is with shaving her damn head? Poor kids Britney for a mom and Kevin-no job or talent having-Federline. That guy has knocked up two women and has four kids.

K-fed has the kids.  I think he's probably the better parent.  Their situation isn't that unique.  Trailer trash with money.



damn K-fed is the better parent...that's really bad
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: LadyKD on February 23, 2007, 08:42:50 PM
 :D Poor kids Britney's and Annna Nicole's.

Since we are keeping it light...when in the sam hell are they going to bury James Brown. He died Christmas day almost two months ago. An my aunties( I am southern) and uncles made the whole family sit through his long ass shuffle and jive funeral for dang near 5 hours that Saturday after Christmas. What happen to just putting the body in the ground and going to the church reception hall for chicken and cake?
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on February 23, 2007, 08:52:03 PM
What's the dispute over?
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: LadyKD on February 23, 2007, 08:55:27 PM
Apparently where to bury him and who gets to do it. The so-called partner wife wants to bury him one place and the kids want to bury him somewhere else. I think I read earlier this week they had settled it and someone was talking about turning his home into a "black" Graceland. Classic just Classic.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on February 23, 2007, 09:06:56 PM
Lol.  I don't get this fighting over bodies stuff.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: jarhead on February 24, 2007, 07:01:06 AM
cause james brown like most black folks didn't have his business in order. the last will he had didn't address his newest daughter and wife, so they're going off of the last one he had which apparently hadn't been updated in some time.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on February 24, 2007, 07:15:42 AM
Video of the crying judge:

http://www.abovethelaw.com/2007/02/judge_larry_seidlin_what_a_clo.php
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: jarhead on February 24, 2007, 07:19:04 AM
lol,  dude couldn't pull himself together before he read that?
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Statistic on February 24, 2007, 07:22:46 AM
dude is such a loser
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Statistic on February 24, 2007, 07:39:53 AM
loser by relation?
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Stand under my Umbrella ella ella, aye!! on February 24, 2007, 07:40:34 AM
TUSCALOOSA, Alabama (AP) -- With a debate swirling nationwide over the n-word, a historically black college in Alabama has set aside four days to discuss the racial slur.

Participants at the conference, which began Thursday and ends Sunday, discussed topics ranging from the origins of the epithet to whether juggling a few letters makes it socially acceptable at the "N" Surrection Conference at Stillman College.

Organizers said the goal of the event is to challenge the use of the n-word "through the use of intelligent dialogue and a thorough examination of black history."

Debate over the use of the word has escalated in recent months, with comedian Michael Richards' racial rant prompting black leaders such as the Rev. Jesse Jackson and California Congresswoman Maxine Waters to urge the public and the entertainment industry to stop using it.

Clarence Sutton Sr., president of the Tuscaloosa chapter of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, said he's taken deep offense to the slur since a 1960 incident when a knife-wielding white youth slapped him and said "n-word, you wanna fight?"

"From that time on in my life, the word n-word was personal. I associated it with the hate and the very deep disdain that this gentleman had perpetrated on me at the time," he said.

These days, Sutton said, it's mostly other blacks he finds using the word.

"I'm fighting now because we have lost a generation of young people who don't know the history associated with that word," Sutton said.

'n-word' is different, some say
Others, like community activist Tim Robinson, said they don't have a problem using the word "n-word" because it's distinctly different and is considered a term of endearment when blacks say it to one another.

"It was n-word which was the bad word, but you've got our people that just went and changed it up a bit," said Robinson.

Some city councils, including ones in New York and New Jersey, have joined a nationwide effort to get people to stop using the word and the AbolishTheNword.com web site was launched last April. (View site)

Andrew Hacker, a political science professor at Queens College and author of "Two Nations: Black and White, Separate, Hostile, Unequal," said just getting rid of the word wouldn't stamp out racism.

"I really think that as far as white people are concerned, the word is almost on its way out," said Hacker, who is white. "That said, there are a lot of white people who still in the privacy of their own minds think the word even if they don't use it because they regard black people as genetically inferior and that word categorizes that."

Others want all forms of n-word banished
Kovan Flowers, co-founder of AbolishTheNWord.com, said striking the word from use would help set an example for other races.

"We can't say anything to Hispanics, or whites or whoever unless we stop using it ourselves," he said. "It's the root of the mind-set that's affecting why people are low, from housing to jobs to education."

Stillman senior Maurice Williams said he organized the conference hoping to educate his peers about the history of the word. The event includes a community fair, charity basketball game, unity march and discussions ranging from the word's origin to its use among various ethnic groups.

"I had to understand that a lot of the images that we portray in television, in the media, in the hip-hop environment -- all of those things have the same connotations as the n-word itself, so therefore it's the n-word personified," Williams said. "Where do you see another culture portraying some of these same images?"

Rapper Tupac Shakur was credited with legitimizing the term "n-word" when he came out with the song "N.I.G.G.A.," which he said stood for "Never Ignorant Getting Goals Accomplished."

Stillman English professor Alisea McLeod said she doesn't buy it.

"It's hogwash. What this is really indicative of is a heart problem," she said. "What is coming out of mouths is what is coming out of souls. These are not words that are uplifting and I think (they) point to a bigger problem -- a lack of self-love."

Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Statistic on February 24, 2007, 07:56:57 AM
you can't grade jokes about yourself
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: jarhead on February 24, 2007, 08:02:15 AM
Justice Department Fires 8th U.S. Attorney
Dispute Over Death Penalty Cited

By Dan Eggen
Washington Post Staff Writer
Saturday, February 24, 2007; Page A02

An eighth U.S. attorney announced her resignation yesterday, the latest in a wave of forced departures of federal prosecutors who have clashed with the Justice Department over the death penalty and other issues.

Margaret Chiara, the 63-year-old U.S. attorney in Grand Rapids, Mich., told her staff that she was leaving her post after more than five years, officials said. Sources familiar with the case confirmed that she was among a larger group of prosecutors who were first asked to resign Dec. 7.
 
Chiara is the second female U.S. attorney to be dismissed. The other is Carol Lam of San Diego. Before the firings, 15 of 93 U.S. attorneys were women, department records show.

The firings have been criticized by lawmakers in both parties and have prompted proposals in Congress to restrict the ability of Attorney General Alberto R. Gonzales to appoint interim prosecutors indefinitely.

Chiara declined to comment on her departure, which is effective March 16. She will be replaced on an interim basis by Russell C. Stoddard, who recently joined the Grand Rapids office, officials said.

U.S. District Judge Robert Holmes Bell, the chief judge in Michigan's Western District, said in an interview yesterday that Chiara has an excellent reputation in Grand Rapids.

"This is a very classy, distinguished, highly regarded public servant," said Bell, who was appointed to the bench during the Reagan administration. "She's one of the best United States attorneys we've had in this district, and all of my colleagues agree. . . . To have her suddenly disappear without warning catches us all flat-footed."

Deputy Attorney General Paul J. McNulty told senators earlier this month that all but one of the prosecutors were fired for "performance-related" reasons. McNulty said that former U.S. attorney Bud Cummins of Little Rock was removed so the job could be given to a former aide to presidential adviser Karl Rove.

Nearly all of the dismissed prosecutors had positive job reviews, but many had run into political trouble with Washington over immigration, capital punishment or other issues, according to prosecutors and others. At least four also were presiding over high-profile public corruption investigations when they were dismissed.

Chiara -- who had once studied to be a nun -- is personally opposed to capital punishment, but in 2002 she presided over the first death penalty case in Michigan in more than 60 years. A year later, then-Attorney General John D. Ashcroft rejected a plea agreement proposed by Chiara's office in a separate murder case, according to news reports.

Another of the fired U.S. attorneys, Paul K. Charlton of Phoenix, also clashed with Washington over the death penalty.

Justice officials have been evasive about the number of fired prosecutors. McNulty told the Senate Judiciary Committee that fewer than 10 had been dismissed, but he declined to elaborate.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on February 24, 2007, 08:11:15 AM
They're all political appointees.  Who cares.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on February 24, 2007, 08:12:05 AM
lol,  dude couldn't pull himself together before he read that?

I think he was trying to be dramatic.  But he's much less charismatic than I thought from the news reports.  He doesn't need a TV show.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: jarhead on February 24, 2007, 08:14:14 AM
They're all political appointees.  Who cares.


the article implies that they are being dismissed because they're not doing what the administration wants. that's been a common theme with this administration.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on February 24, 2007, 08:20:02 AM
It's their prerogative.  If America doesn't like it, they can vote the administration out.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: jarhead on February 24, 2007, 08:27:48 AM
yeah well its a little deeper than. since Bush gangbanged his way into office their have been a lot of very intelligent, very briliant, very competent and qualified people demoted, fired, disgraced, disrespected, and demonized because they told it the way it is not the way the administration would like it to be....and lots of people are dying because of it, so its a big problem as i see it
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on February 24, 2007, 08:28:54 AM
And presumably you will vote against him in the next election.  Still doesn't make it any less of his prerogative.  The next administration can fire all of the smart death penalty lovers and put in smart death penalty haters.  Would you criticize that?
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: jarhead on February 24, 2007, 08:37:05 AM
dude im not going to argue this with you, i realize that he was voted in but he was voted in because they intentionally lied and manipulated information and then placed the blame on the intel community...so called "faulty intelligence". they threatened anybody who didn't tell the story the way they wanted it told. anybody who resisted was painted unpatriotic or on the side of terrorists. now you may say that the american people should have been smart enough to know but the fact is they're not, and they don't have the access to make an intelligent decision even if they were. i really can't get into it anymore than that. with all due respect you don't know what your talking about
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on February 24, 2007, 08:48:26 AM
Yeah, he lied, manipulated the system, blah blah blah.  Point is, this is how our political system works.  Everyone voted in isn't going to be the most qualified person/the person you like most.  They're all going to do things you don't like.  Some of those things might even be unethical by your standards.  Rage against the machine, angry one, but that's how it works.  If you don't understand that, then I can only smh.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: jarhead on February 24, 2007, 09:01:41 AM
Yeah, he lied, manipulated the system, blah blah blah.  Point is, this is how our political system works.  Everyone voted in isn't going to be the most qualified person/the person you like most.  They're all going to do things you don't like.  Some of those things might even be unethical by your standards.  Rage against the machine, angry one, but that's how it works.  If you don't understand that, then I can only smh.


Alcibiades, you're an intelligent guy and i respect your opinion even though i dont alwasy agree. but this is not some esoteric discussion for me nor is it an intellectual excersize. im not even supposed to be talking about this stuff but im a short timer so whatever. you are talking about democracy and political systems. you have know idea, you couldn't because you dont have the clearance and you don't have the accesses. i'm not trying to say that you don't know what your talking about because you're not smart, im just stating a fact you don't have the information necessary to know what you're talking about. the scandals and corruption that you all hear about on the news are like .1% of what goes on. i understand that a federal prosecutor is appointed but when you fire someone because they in their judgement (which you must assume would be far more informed and educated than some title holder in washington) decide a defendant does not warrant the death penalty. when you fire this person w/o even looking at the case or considering the circumstances because your ideological political postion is that the death penalty is just that is a problem and an abuse of power. what i am saying to you is that when the book on this administration is written, the post freedom of information act book, this administration will go down as the most corrupt, imperialistic, and criminal in the entire history of the united states of america. richard milhouse nixon will look like a naughty toddler compared to the abuses of this administration. this article tells me that it has now spread to the judiciary so political discussion aside. it is a problem
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on February 24, 2007, 09:09:41 AM
Yeah, he lied, manipulated the system, blah blah blah.  Point is, this is how our political system works.  Everyone voted in isn't going to be the most qualified person/the person you like most.  They're all going to do things you don't like.  Some of those things might even be unethical by your standards.  Rage against the machine, angry one, but that's how it works.  If you don't understand that, then I can only smh.


Alcibiades, you're an intelligent guy and i respect your opinion even though i dont alwasy agree. but this is not some esoteric discussion for me nor is it an intellectual excersize. im not even supposed to be talking about this stuff but im a short timer so whatever. you are talking about democracy and political systems. you have know idea, you couldn't because you dont have the clearance and you don't have the accesses. i'm not trying to say that you don't know what your talking about because you're not smart, im just stating a fact you don't have the information necessary to know what you're talking about. the scandals and corruption that you all hear about on the news are like .1% of what goes on. i understand that a federal prosecutor is appointed but when you fire someone because they in their judgement (which you must assume would be far more informed and educated than some title holder in washington) decide a defendant does not warrant the death penalty. when you fire this person w/o even looking at the case or considering the circumstances because your ideological political postion is that the death penalty is just that is a problem and an abuse of power. what i am saying to you is that when the book on this administration is written, the post freedom of information act book, this administration will go down as the most corrupt, imperialistic, and criminal in the entire history of the united states of america. richard milhouse nixon will look like a naughty toddler compared to the abuses of this administration. this article tells me that it has now spread to the judiciary so political discussion aside. it is a problem

I'm not disagreeing with you over the corruptness of the administration.  I'm just saying that, irrespective of the level of corruption, it is their prerogative to appoint and fire whomever they want.  You might not agree with it; I might not agree with it.  But there is little that can, or even should, be done.  Maybe they fooled the American people, but our political system allows that to occur, and unless we change the political system, it will continue to occur.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: jarhead on February 24, 2007, 09:19:47 AM
i understand that but that was not why i posted the article i posted the article to call attention to the fact that they are reaching into the lower levels of the judiciary firing prosecutors who dont tow the company line. yes they have the right to appoint and depoint whoever they choose and yes they do so along the lines of the candidates political leanings. if these prosecutors were acting outside of the law or were just bad attorneys i would have no problem. but simply because they're are outside of some ideology, i feel that's abuse of power. what's next
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on February 24, 2007, 09:23:05 AM
Lol.  Yeah, I'm tired of arguing this one.  I also thought it was poor form.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Statistic on February 24, 2007, 10:14:25 AM
Blacks make higher IQ gains in college than whites - study by Washington Univ shows black college students increase their IQ scores more than four times as much as whites - Brief Article

Black college graduates make greater IQ gains during their college careers than their White counterparts according to a new study.

Researchers at Washington University in St. Louis found that Blacks who graduate from college increase their IQ scores more than four times as much as Whites while in college. And that actually narrows the gap between Blacks and Whites in IQ scores by as much as half.

In high school, the researchers said, the gap between the IQs of Black and White students actually gets wider.

The overall study challenges some of the central arguments of the controversial book The Bell Curve, The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reported. The researchers launched the study in response to the 1994 book.

The study contradicts the book's contention that Blacks are genetically less intelligent than Whites and that this gap cannot be reduced through education, the researchers said.

"The quality and quantity of education makes a big difference," said Mark Rank, one of the lead researchers in the IQ study. "That is not a genetic effect. It is an environmental effect."

The researchers at Washington University used a similar analysis of the same data used in The Bell Curve's analyses, but they added a look at differences in educational experiences.

Researchers attributed the changes in Black students' IQs to the relatively poor quality of pre-college education that many Blacks receive and the level playing field generally offered to college students regardless of their race.

COPYRIGHT 1997 Johnson Publishing Co.
COPYRIGHT 2004 Gale Group
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on February 24, 2007, 10:37:38 AM
Link?
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Statistic on February 24, 2007, 10:48:31 AM
http://calbears.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m1355/is_n22_v92/ai_19916746
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Special Agent Dana Scully on February 24, 2007, 10:51:58 AM
good find Opoto  :)
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on February 24, 2007, 10:53:18 AM
http://calbears.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m1355/is_n22_v92/ai_19916746

thx
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on February 24, 2007, 03:10:03 PM
Virginia expresses 'profound regret' for slavery

RICHMOND, Virginia (AP) -- Meeting on the grounds of the former Confederate Capitol, the Virginia General Assembly voted unanimously Saturday to express "profound regret" for the state's role in slavery.

Sponsors of the resolution say they know of no other state that has apologized for slavery, although Missouri lawmakers are considering such a measure. The resolution does not carry the weight of law but sends an important symbolic message, supporters said.

"This session will be remembered for a lot of things, but 20 years hence I suspect one of those things will be the fact that we came together and passed this resolution," said Delegate A. Donald McEachin, a Democrat who sponsored it in the House of Delegates.

The resolution passed the House 96-0 and cleared the 40-member Senate on a unanimous voice vote. It does not require Gov. Timothy M. Kaine's approval.

The measure also expressed regret for "the exploitation of Native Americans."

The resolution was introduced as Virginia begins its celebration of the 400th anniversary of Jamestown, where the first Africans arrived in 1619. Richmond, home to a popular boulevard lined with statues of Confederate heroes, later became another point of arrival for Africans and a slave-trade hub.

The resolution says government-sanctioned slavery "ranks as the most horrendous of all depredations of human rights and violations of our founding ideals in our nation's history, and the abolition of slavery was followed by systematic discrimination, enforced segregation, and other insidious institutions and practices toward Americans of African descent that were rooted in racism, racial bias, and racial misunderstanding."

In Virginia, black voter turnout was suppressed with a poll tax and literacy tests before those practices were struck down by federal courts, and state leaders responded to federally ordered school desegregation with a "Massive Resistance" movement in the 1950s and early '60s.

The apology is the latest in a series of strides Virginia has made in overcoming its segregationist past. Virginia was the first state to elect a black governor -- L. Douglas Wilder in 1989 -- and the Legislature took a step toward atoning for Massive Resistance in 2004 by creating a scholarship fund for blacks whose schools were shut down between 1954 and 1964.

Among those voting for the measure was Delegate Frank D. Hargrove, an 80-year-old Republican who infuriated black leaders last month by saying "black citizens should get over" slavery.

After enduring a barrage of criticism, Hargrove successfully co-sponsored a resolution calling on Virginia to celebrate "Juneteenth," a holiday commemorating the end of slavery in the United States.

http://www.cnn.com/2007/POLITICS/02/24/slavery.apology.ap/index.html
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Non_Prophet on February 24, 2007, 03:15:46 PM
Virginia expresses 'profound regret' for slavery

The measure also expressed regret for "the exploitation genocide conducted against Native Americans."



Fixed for historical accuracy.


Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: pikey on February 24, 2007, 06:11:16 PM
I was quite dissapointed when I arrived in Atl for undergrad, only to discover that Freaknik had ended a year or two before I got there.  I wanted to go to Freaknik ever since I saw that Sista Sista episode where Tia and Tamera went and Mya and Blackstreet performed "Take Me There"!  :D 

why in the world would you have wanted to go to freanik??

Just caught this one.  As the bolded stated, I'm a fob who got (most of) my info about Freaknik from Sista Sista.  Sista Sista did not show the seedy side of Freaknik, just the big concert!   ;D
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: jarhead on February 25, 2007, 11:17:17 AM
NEW YORK - Genealogists have found that civil rights activist the Rev.        Al Sharpton is a descendent of a slave owned by relatives of the late Sen. Strom Thurmond, a newspaper reported Sunday.

The Daily News said professional genealogists, working at the newspaper's behest, recently uncovered the ancestral ties between one of the nation's best known black leaders and a man who was once a prominent defender of segregation.

"I have always wondered what was the background of my family," the newspaper quoted Sharpton as saying. "But nothing — nothing — could prepare me for this."

"It's chilling. It's amazing."

Sharpton's office said Sunday morning that he would not comment until a news conference planned for later in the day.

Some of Thurmond's relatives said the connection also came as a surprise to them. A niece, Ellen Senter, said she would speak with Sharpton if he were interested.

"I doubt you can find many native South Carolinians today whose family, if you traced them back far enough, didn't own slaves," said Senter, 61, of Columbia, S.C. She added: "And it is wonderful that (Sharpton) was able to become what he is in spite of what his forefather was."

One of the late senator's sons, Paul Thurmond, and a nephew, Barry Bishop, declined comment, the Daily News said.

According to the newspaper, the genealogists found documents establishing that Sharpton's great-grandfather, Coleman Sharpton, was a slave owned by Julia Thurmond, whose grandfather was Strom Thurmond's great-great-grandfather. Coleman Sharpton was later freed.

The newspaper said the lead researcher was Megan Smolenyak, the chief family historian for Ancestry.com and an author of several published books on genealogy. Another researcher on the project was Tony Burroughs, who teaches genealogy at Chicago State University.

Strom Thurmond, of South Carolina, was once considered a symbol of segregation. During his 1948 bid for president, he promised to preserve racial segregation. In 1957, he filibustered for more than 24 hours against a civil rights bill.

But Thurmond was seen as softening his stance later in his long life. He died in 2003, at 100. The longest-serving senator in history, he was originally a Democrat but became a Republican in 1964.

His children have acknowledged that Thurmond fathered a biracial daughter. Essie Mae Washington-Williams' mother was a housekeeper in the home of Thurmond's parents.



If you want to know more, Al's calling a press conference about this
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Statistic on February 25, 2007, 11:26:01 AM
Al Sharpton's hot comb, legend has it, was passed down through the family since slavery which was a gift from an ancestor's owner.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: jarhead on February 25, 2007, 11:51:47 AM
LOL press conference at 7:00
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Stand under my Umbrella ella ella, aye!! on February 25, 2007, 12:29:46 PM
strom thurmond.  chilling is the word.  when i get the dough i'm hiring a genealogist.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Statistic on February 25, 2007, 12:34:13 PM
Sharpton: do we really need a press conference for this? I mean, nobody cares but you.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: LadyKD on February 25, 2007, 01:39:36 PM
Sharpton: do we really need a press conference for this? I mean, nobody cares but you.

Of course we need the press convo..must N-E-G-R-O it up for the cameras. :D

All the other things going on in this world and we waste airtime on this?
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Stand under my Umbrella ella ella, aye!! on February 25, 2007, 02:36:24 PM
Sharpton: do we really need a press conference for this? I mean, nobody cares but you.

Of course we need the press convo..must N-E-G-R-O it up for the cameras. :D

All the other things going on in this world and we waste airtime on this?

right.  i'd much rather hear about anna nicoles rotting corpse
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on February 25, 2007, 06:29:40 PM
I know I said I wouldn't post another article here, but I don't want to interrupt the Oscar talk:

Welfare state growing despite overhauls

By STEPHEN OHLEMACHER, Associated Press Writer 53 minutes ago

The welfare state is bigger than ever despite a decade of policies designed to wean poor people from public aid.

The number of families receiving cash benefits from welfare has plummeted since the government imposed time limits on the payments a decade ago. But other programs for the poor, including Medicaid, food stamps and disability benefits, are bursting with new enrollees.

The result, according to an Associated Press analysis: Nearly one in six people rely on some form of public assistance, a larger share than at any time since the government started measuring two decades ago.

Critics of the welfare overhaul say the numbers offer fresh evidence that few former recipients have become self-sufficient, even though millions have moved from welfare to work. They say the vast majority have been forced into low-paying jobs without benefits and few opportunities to advance.

"If the goal of welfare reform was to get people off the welfare rolls, bravo," said Vivyan Adair, a former welfare recipient who is now an assistant professor of women's studies at Hamilton College in upstate New York. "If the goal was to reduce poverty and give people economic and job stability, it was not a success."

Proponents of the changes in welfare say programs that once discouraged work now offer support to people in low-paying jobs. They point to expanded eligibility rules for food stamps and Medicaid, the health insurance program for the poor, that enable people to keep getting benefits even after they start working.

"I don't have any problems with those programs growing, and indeed, they were intended to grow," said Ron Haskins, a former adviser to President Bush on welfare policy.

"We've taken the step of getting way more people into the labor force and they have taken a huge step toward self-sufficiency. What is the other choice?" he asked.

In the early 1990s, critics contended the welfare system encouraged unemployment and promoted single-parent families. Welfare recipients, mostly single mothers, could lose benefits if they earned too much money or if they lived with the father of their children.

Major changes in welfare were enacted in 1996, requiring most recipients to work but allowing them to continue some benefits after they started jobs. The law imposed a five-year limit on cash payments for most people in the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program, or TANF. Some states have shorter time limits.

Nia Foster fits the pattern of dependence on government programs. She stopped getting cash welfare payments in the late 1990s and has moved from one clerical job to another. None provided medical benefits.

The 32-year-old mother of two from Cincinnati said she supports her family with help from food stamps and Medicaid.

Foster said she did not get any job training when she left welfare. She earned her high-school equivalency last year at a community college.

"If you want to get educated or want to succeed, the welfare office don't care," Foster said. "I don't think they really care what you do once the benefits are gone."

Foster now works in a tax office, a seasonal job that will end after April 15. She hopes to enroll at the University of Cincinnati this spring and would like to study accounting. She is waiting to find out if she qualifies for enough financial aid to cover tuition.

"I like data processing, something where it's a bunch of invoices and you have to key them in," Foster said. "I want to be an accountant so bad."

Shannon Stanfield took a different, less-traveled path from welfare, thanks to a generous program that offered her a chance to get a college education.

Stanfield, 36, was cleaning houses to support her two young children four years ago when she learned about a program for welfare recipients at nearby Hamilton College, a private liberal arts school in Clinton, N.Y.

"At the time I was living in a pretty run-down apartment," said Stanfield, who was getting welfare payments, Medicaid and food stamps. "It wasn't healthy."

The program, called the Access Project, accepts about 25 welfare-eligible parents a year. Hamilton waives tuition for first-year students and the program supplements financial aid in later years. Students get a host of social and career services, including help finding internships and jobs and financial assistance in times of crisis.

About 140 former welfare recipients have completed the program and none still relies on government programs for the poor, said Adair, the Hamilton professor who started the Access Project in 2001.

Stanfield, who still gets Medicaid and food stamps, plans to graduate in May with a bachelor's degree in theater. She wants to be a teacher.

"I slowly built up my confidence through education," Stanfield said. "I can't honestly tell you how much it has changed my life."

Programs such as the Access Project are not cheap, which is one reason they are rare. Tuition and fees run about $35,000 a year at Hamilton, and the program's annual budget is between $250,000 and $500,000, Adair said.

In 2005, about 5.1 million people received monthly welfare payments from TANF and similar state programs, a 60 percent drop from a decade before.

But other government programs grew, offsetting the declines.

About 44 million people — nearly one in six in the country — relied on government services for the poor in 2003, according to the most recent statistics compiled by the Census Bureau. That compares with about 39 million in 1996.

Also, the number of people getting government aid continues to increase, according to more recent enrollment figures from individual programs.

Medicaid rolls alone topped 45 million people in 2005, pushed up in part by rising health care costs and fewer employers offering benefits. Nearly 26 million people a month received food stamps that year.

Cash welfare recipients, by comparison, peaked at 14.2 million people in 1994.

There is much debate over whether those leaving welfare for work should be offered more opportunities for training and education, so they do not have to settle for low-paying jobs that keep them dependent on government programs.

"We said get a job, any job," said Rep. Jim McDermott (news, bio, voting record), chairman of the House subcommittee that oversees welfare issues. "And now we expect them to be making it on these minimum-wage jobs."

McDermott, D-Wash., said stricter work requirements enacted last year, when Congress renewed the welfare overhaul law, will make it even more difficult for welfare recipients to get sufficient training to land good-paying jobs.

But people who support the welfare changes say former recipients often fare better economically if they start working, even in low-paying jobs, before entering education programs.

"What many people on TANF need first is the confidence that they can succeed in the workplace and to develop the habits of work," said Wade Horn, the Bush administration's point man on welfare overhaul.

"Also, many TANF recipients didn't have a lot of success in the classroom," Horn said. "If you want to improve the confidence of a TANF recipient, putting them in the classroom, where they failed in the past, that is not likely to increase their confidence."

Horn noted that employment among poor single mothers is up and child poverty rates are down since the welfare changes in 1996, though the numbers have worsened since the start of the decade.

Horn, however, said he would like to see local welfare agencies provide more education and training to people who have already moved from welfare to work.

"I think more attention has to be paid to helping those families move up the income scale, increasing their independence of other government welfare programs," Horn said.

"The true goal of welfare to work programs should be self-sufficiency."

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070226/ap_on_re_us/welfare_state
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: jarhead on February 26, 2007, 04:02:40 PM
hey Al Sharpton...............it's enough, thanks.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Jontor on February 28, 2007, 04:43:37 AM
Interesting Column Published in AsianWeekly:

http://www.cnn.com/2007/US/02/27/racist.column.ap/index.html

Why I HATE BLACKS

SAN FRANCISCO, California (AP) -- Asian-American leaders are calling on a weekly newspaper to apologize and cut ties with a writer who penned a column titled "Why I Hate Blacks."

In the piece, which appeared in the February 23 edition of San Francisco-based AsianWeek, contributor Kenneth Eng lists reasons why he supports discrimination against blacks, writing, among other things, "I would argue that blacks are weak-willed. They are the only race that has been enslaved for 300 years."

An official at the nationally circulated paper apologized and called the column's publication a mistake.

Leaders at the Asian American Justice Center, Chinese for Affirmative Action, Coalition for Asian Pacific Americans and other groups are circulating a petition denouncing the piece as "irresponsible journalism, blatantly racist, replete with stereotypes, and deeply hurtful to African Americans."

The petition calls on AsianWeek to cut ties with Eng, issue an apology, print an editorial refuting the column, and fire or demote the editors who published it.

"Something like this should never have been printed," said Vincent Eng, deputy director of the Asian American Justice Center in Washington, who is not related to the columnist. "Deliberate action needs to be taken to make sure this type of hate speech doesn't continue."

AsianWeek, with a circulation of 48,505, issued a statement apologizing for "any harm or hurt this has caused the African American community."

The newspaper plans to hold a news conference with NAACP leaders in San Francisco on Wednesday to discuss how the Asian and black communities "can be different and yet get along and work together," said Ted Fang, the paper's editor at large.

"The newspaper is sorry that this got published, and I am personally sorry that this got published," Fang told The Associated Press. "The views in that opinion piece do not in any way reflect the views of AsianWeek."

The paper plans to review its policies to "understand how this happened and make sure it doesn't happen again," Fang said, calling the decision to publish Eng's piece a "mistake."

Fang's family publishes AsianWeek, along with a local newspaper called the Independent, and owned the San Francisco Examiner between 2000 and 2004. AsianWeek calls itself "The Voice of Asian America."

The column was among several written by Kenneth Eng, who has described himself as an "Asian Supremacist." Previous columns have been titled "Proof That Whites Inherently Hate Us" and "Why I Hate Asians."

A telephone listing for Eng could not be located.

Sophie Maxwell, one of the city's top black officials and a member of the city's board of supervisors, said she doesn't believe Eng's column will hurt relations between blacks and Asians in San Francisco. She has co-sponsored a city resolution condemning the article and AsianWeek's decision to publish it.

"This man clearly is very ignorant of African-American history and his own history, and he's very angry," said Maxwell, who represents a district with large black and Asian populations.

Copyright 2007 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.


http://www.cnn.com/2007/US/02/27/racist.column.ap/index.html
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: P.U.S.H on February 28, 2007, 05:59:22 AM
I read this, and I'm sorry - how could an article like this slip through? I'm no journalist, but it had to have passed at least one other editor's hands before print - one that would have known this would cause a stir.

I smell a pub ploy, especially since the same author has written previous "hate" articles.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on March 02, 2007, 06:12:23 PM
This is random, but I do so revel in watching the downward spiral of Airbus.  Schadenfreude at its best.  I was rather peeved at UPS (A Great American Company) last week when it renewed that deal with them, but now all is well:

Airbus losing remaining A380 cargo order

By LAURENCE FROST and HARRY WEBER, AP Business Writers2 hours, 39 minutes ago

Airbus was left with an empty order book for the cargo version of its much-delayed superjumbo plane after UPS Inc. said Friday it would cancel its order for 10 A380s.The move comes just a week after UPS, the world's largest shipping carrier, and Airbus announced a revised agreement that gave either party the right to terminate the order.

In a statement, Atlanta-based UPS said it decided to cancel after it learned Airbus was diverting employees from the freighter program to work on its passenger plane program.

UPS said the final cancellation decision will be formally presented to Airbus on the first date specified under last week's agreement.

"We lost confidence in their ability to meet those schedules," UPS spokesman Mark Giuffre said of the A380F agreement with Airbus.

The announcement by UPS comes four months after rival FedEx Corp. also scrapped its 10-plane order, and leaves Airbus with no orders for the superjumbo freighter — dealing a new blow to its A380 program, whose two-year delay cut 5 billion euros ($6.6 billion) off profit forecasts for 2006-2010. Airbus still has orders for passenger versions of the A380.

"We respect the client's decision," Airbus spokeswoman Barbara Kracht said in response to the cancellation. "UPS is and remains a valuable and strong customer and business partner for Airbus."

The A380 program as a whole "is progressing well and in line with the new timetable, with the first delivery to the first customer in October 2007," she said, referring to launch customer Singapore Airlines — set to become the first carrier to take paying passengers in the double-decker plane.

UPS declined to comment on whether the company was likely to order other aircraft from Airbus or turn to Chicago-based Boeing Co. to fill the gap left by the cancellations. "We're looking at our next steps," Giuffre said.

Chris Lozier, an analyst for Chicago-based Morningstar, said the cancellation is a crippling blow for the entire Airbus cargo program and a boon for Boeing.

"It almost spells the demise for that cargo business, because the alternative to the 380 is the (Boeing) 747," he said. "You would expect UPS to be at the negotiating table with Boeing right now, if not weeks ago, working out details for the 747."

Howard Rubel of Jefferies and Co. said in a note to investors that the cancellation "effectively gives Boeing complete ownership of the very large freighter market for the foreseeable future."

Boeing declined to say whether it was in talks for the UPS contract.

"While UPS is a longstanding and valued customer of ours, we do not and cannot comment on any discussions we might be having with customers," said Jim Proulx, a spokesman for Boeing's commercial airplane division in Seattle.

UPS, also known as United Parcel Service, had ordered its first 10 A380 aircraft in January 2005 for use on U.S.-Asia routes. The deal included an option to buy 10 more planes.

Shares of Airbus parent European Aeronautic Defence and Space Co. had already been tumbling on the freighter program freeze, announced late Thursday. The stock ended the day down 4 percent at 23.63 euros ($31.23) in Paris trading.

The A380 setback came as French unions called for a one-day strike next Tuesday to protest 10,000 planned job cuts and the sale or closure of six Airbus plants under the "Power8" restructuring plan unveiled by Chief Executive Louis Gallois Wednesday.

German Airbus workers may join the strike, union officials said, along with staff at other EADS facilities in both countries.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070302/ap_on_bi_ge/france_airbus
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: jarhead on March 03, 2007, 04:23:46 PM

Mr. Untouchable’ Emerges From Shadows
             
By SAM ROBERTS
Published: March 4, 2007
The 74-year-old man who used to be Leroy Nicholas Barnes, owner of 60 pairs of custom-made shoes, 27 full-length leather coats and more than one Mercedes-Benz, wears baggy Lee dungarees these days and drives to work in a used car he bought five years ago.

Leroy Nicholas Barnes had a presence that gained him attention, good and bad, as a drug dealer in the 1970s.

Mr. Barnes played chess in August with Marc Levin, director of "Mr. Untouchable."
With his slight limp and mostly bald pate, he seems the antithesis of his former persona as Mr. Untouchable, the dashing Harlem heroin dealer who posed 30 years ago on a magazine cover in a blue denim suit and a red, white and blue tie.

Mr. Barnes’s posture of smug invulnerability so affronted President Jimmy Carter that he ordered his attorney general to, as they say, prosecute Mr. Barnes to the fullest extent of the law.

The Justice Department did just that. And in 1977, Mr. Barnes — a former addict with a junior high education who made a fortune flooding black neighborhoods with heroin and swaggered around as an invincible outlaw — was sentenced to life in prison without parole.

“He was the No. 1; he had charisma,” said Sterling Johnson Jr., a federal judge and former special narcotics prosecutor in New York City. “Have you been in the presence of Bill Clinton when he walks down the street? That was Nicky Barnes.”

While Mr. Barnes, widely known as Nicky, languished behind bars, though, his former cronies, his wife and his girlfriends began cavorting, he said, squandering the criminal enterprise that had made them all millionaires. So much for honor among thieves. Mr. Barnes felt betrayed.

“They had a sleeping lion, a caged lion,” he recalled, “and they woke him up.”

And so Mr. Barnes roared, so ferocious a government witness that scores of drug dealers were convicted. He was released into the federal witness protection program in 1998.

And then he disappeared.

Years ago, a former associate predicted how difficult it would be for Mr. Barnes to adjust to a life of anonymity if he ever turned informer and was granted a fresh identity.

“If he runs a Laundromat in Dubuque or a grocery store in Slippery Rock, that’s one thing,” the associate said. “But the man has a tremendous amount of charisma and intelligence. I don’t think he’s going to be innocuous anywhere.”

For nearly a decade, though, Mr. Barnes says, he has managed to seamlessly blend into mainstream America, this time untouchable by those he incriminated and the friends and families of foes he murdered.

“A lot of people think I’m dead,” he says. “The anonymity that cloaks middle America is the life I’m comfortable with, and what I want to be.”

Last weekend, Mr. Barnes surfaced briefly, and pseudonymously, to promote a new book about his old life in the feral 1970s, “Mr. Untouchable,” written with Tom Folsom. This summer, he will appear in a documentary with the same name and later this year a movie, “American Gangster,” is to be released. It stars Cuba Gooding Jr. as Mr. Barnes, but, to his exasperation, focuses on his chief rival in Harlem’s heroin trade, Frank Lucas.

The dapper Nicky Barnes that audiences will see bears little resemblance to the man he says he has become, a grandfather who puts in solid 40-hour weeks at an undisclosed job, who lives in a white neighborhood in an undisclosed state, and who matter-of-factly takes home doggie bags from restaurants.

“Nicky Barnes is not around anymore,” he said. “Nicky Barnes’s lifestyle and his value system is extinct. I left Nicky Barnes behind.”

Money is a common denominator in his lives past and present. Once he made so much that he worried about how to dispose of it. Now, he says he needs more to survive.

“I live within my paycheck,” he said. “I want to get up every day and get in the car and go to work and be a respected member of my community. And I am respected. I know I am. I’m not looking in the rear view mirror to see if anyone is tailing me anymore. I don’t turn on the blender when I’m at home so I can talk. That is not a part of my life. Sure, I’d love to have more money, but I am not willing to do anything but go to my job to get it.”

Except sell some of the secrets of his old life.

He agreed to be interviewed, but not photographed, by The New York Times, somewhere in middle America. He would not divulge much about his new identity.

His mission, he insisted, was not some late-life effort to stroke his ego, seek vindication or arrange redemption. He just wants to make a buck off his autobiography.

“Ego? That’s not what I need, not with gas at $3,” he said. “I need bank, and this is my only way to get it.”

The millions he made and squandered, he said, are gone.

“I miss it,” he said. “There was glamour, money, influence, attractive women. I didn’t have any financial concerns, and I do have them now. I’m concerned about being able to retire at some point comfortably. That’s my principal concern.”

He said he received no subsidy from the government for his cooperation. (His profits from the book might yet be diverted to his victims under New York law.)

Mr. Barnes is still on probation, which means he has to submit to a monthly urine test for drugs. He must regularly show his pay stubs to federal marshals and account for any expense over $500.

A former altar boy, he converted to Islam and earned a bachelor’s degree in prison. Nowadays, he doesn’t believe in much, he says, but neither drinks nor smokes and plays by the government’s rules.

“I look over my shoulder,” he said. “I worry. I want to fly under the radar.”

He lives in a middle-class neighborhood. So many of his neighbors are white that Mr. Barnes, who has not undergone plastic surgery, did not worry they would be watching when his criminal career was profiled recently on Black Entertainment Television.

“Everybody gets up, gets in their cars and goes to work,” he said of his neighbors. “There’s nobody with 20 pounds of heroin in their car.”

He watches basketball on television and loved “Little Miss Sunshine.” He has started writing rap lyrics and looks forward to spending time with his grandchildren. He can coolly recount drug deals with the Mafia and what he says were police payoffs.

But raise the right subject and, in a flash, Mr. Barnes can rip off the mask of frumpy respectability and transmogrify into a spitting, expletive-spewing image of the old days. Ask him, for example, whether he was ever framed by law enforcement.

“This case right here! This case right here!” he explodes. “The Constitution doesn’t allow prosecutors to convict people because they’re doing something morally wrong. Yeah, I was a drug dealer and I was doing everything they said I was doing. But they didn’t catch me at it. I’m not saying I was innocent. I’m saying with all I was doing they could not get a conviction without a contrivance.”

Mr. Barnes said federal agents eavesdropping on his associates had mistakenly transcribed “payroll” as “kilo.”

He remains furious that while he was imprisoned some of his former confederates consorted with his wife and girlfriends. But hadn’t he been a womanizer himself?

“The issue was the bond that we had among us,” he replied. “Don’t evaluate my moral character and start splitting eyelashes.”

Mr. Barnes is a captivating conversationalist, but not a particularly sympathetic character. He unabashedly, though not necessarily proudly, admits to destroying lives, peddling heroin, committing murder, contributing to police corruption and informing on his confederates.

He was doomed to die in prison until he agreed to cooperate. After that, Rudolph W. Giuliani, a former United States attorney, was among those who intervened to get him out of prison and into witness protection.

Is there anything worse than being an informer?

“Being in prison for the rest of your life,” Mr. Barnes said sharply. “I’d rather be out as a witness than be in there and what they characterize as a stand-up guy.”

“I’m out,” he said. “They’re in.”

In the new documentary, one former associate, Frank James, urges Mr. Barnes to deliver a positive message to black youth and to admit that what he did was wrong.

“Frank is right,” Mr. Barnes said. “I knew it was wrong then. I did it for money.”

He said he opposed the legalization of drugs, not because that would be bad for business, but rather because making them readily available would kill more blacks.

He was matter of fact in discussing how he would react to a person who sold his family drugs. “It’s not that person’s fault,” Mr. Barnes said. “Let’s say I launched a crusade and killed 10 drug dealers. The user would find an 11th.”

Mr. Barnes said his two daughters, who were raised in foster care after he was imprisoned, knew about his former life. His grandchildren do not.

A female friend doesn’t know about his past either. “I don’t think I could tell her, she wouldn’t understand,” he said. “That’s how I know it won’t be a long-term thing.”

After dinner in a crowded restaurant, it was time for Mr. Barnes to return to his life of mundane routines and aging secrets. He politely asked the waitress to pack up his leftover grilled salmon. She handed him a foam container that he stoutly carted away.

“In the old days,” he acknowledged, “I would’ve been embarrassed.”

Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: jarhead on March 04, 2007, 04:41:44 PM
why do these dudes keep trying to get away with this...they always get caught



Suspect in wife's dismemberment arrested
From the Associated Press
3:32 PM PST, March 4, 2007


HARBOR SPRINGS, Mich. -- Wearing neither coat nor shoes, a fugitive suspected of killing and dismembering his wife was found hiding under a fallen tree today in a snowbound state park after a bitterly cold night on the run, authorities said.

Police tracked down Stephen Grant about 225 miles north of the suburban Detroit community where body parts believed to be those of his wife were discovered. He was in stable condition and was being treated for frostbite and hypothermia under police guard at a hospital.

Grant was wearing only slacks, a shirt and socks when he was captured nearly 10 hours after he abandoned a truck and set out on foot in Wilderness State Park near the tip of Michigan's Lower Peninsula, Emmet County Sheriff Pete Wallin said. He had no weapons and did not resist.

"I don't think he probably could have made it much longer in those kind of conditions," Wallin said during a news conference. "I wouldn't want to be out there unless I was dressed for it."

Grant, 37, will be returned to Macomb County for arraignment in the death of Tara Lynn Grant, a 34-year-old businesswoman and mother of two who disappeared last month. A torso found in the family home and other body parts found in a park near their home were believed to be hers.

Tara Grant last was seen Feb. 9, and police said the couple had argued that day over her business travels abroad. Her husband reported her missing five days later; he has steadfastly maintained his innocence.

Macomb County Sheriff Mark Hackel said Stephen Grant fled in a friend's pickup Friday hours after police executed a search warrant on the home in Washington Township. Deputies traced calls from his cell phone and a withdrawal from an automatic teller machine, Wallin said.

After finding the truck just south of the isolated Lake Michigan park, police with tracking dogs searched on foot and snowmobile, aided by a Coast Guard helicopter. They pounded on doors and warned occupants of nearby homes and the handful of cabins inside the park.

"We didn't know what we were up against," Wallin said. "We knew he was suicidal, we knew he could be armed and dangerous."

The helicopter crew, dispatched from the U.S. Coast Guard station in Traverse City, spotted fresh footprints in the snow and guided ground searchers in Grant's direction, Lt. Jeremy Loeb said.

"We could see where he'd lay down, get up, lay down again," Wallin said.

After an all-night search, he was found about 6:30 a.m. near Big Sucker Creek, which flows into Lake Michigan, about three miles from where he abandoned the truck, Wallin said.

Grant said nothing as he was hoisted into the helicopter, Loeb said.

His former attorney had called Grant suicidal, but Hackel said it didn't appear he had tried to commit suicide.

It was unclear why Grant headed to the park, although the family had visited northern Michigan frequently, Hackel said. Temperatures were in the mid-teens and the swampy, heavily wooded park was covered in snow.

Dr. John Bednar, chief of staff at Northern Michigan Hospital in Petoskey, said Grant was in stable condition. He was being treated for hypothermia and frostbite but was alert and cooperative, Bednar said. The extent of his injuries was uncertain.

An arrest warrant charged Grant with murder, and disinterment and mutilation. An autopsy was being conducted Sunday, but Hackel said he was certain of the identity and he had "no doubt" Stephen Grant committed the murder.

David Griem, a lawyer who has acted as Grant's spokesman, said Sunday he would no longer represent Grant because of irreconcilable differences. He said Grant didn't yet have another attorney.

"If I can't give a client all of my blood, sweat and tears, it's time for that client to find a new attorney and time for me to move on down the road," Griem said.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on March 04, 2007, 05:19:55 PM
You know this dood's craaaaazy:

(http://i.a.cnn.net/cnn/2007/US/03/04/missing.woman.ap/story.grant.ap.jpg)
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: LadyKD on March 07, 2007, 04:08:03 PM
He went to Yale right?

Jordan's king urges US peace push 
 
 
King Abdullah of Jordan has told the US Congress that America must throw its weight behind an urgent drive to make peace in the Middle East.
Addressing representatives and senators in Washington, the king said the status quo could not be allowed to continue.

It "is pulling the region and the world towards greater danger... the cycle of crisis is spinning faster," he warned.

The king suggested a solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict was more urgent than the conflict in Iraq.

While Iraq was a source of concern, "the wellspring of regional division, the source of resentment and frustration... is the denial of justice and peace in Palestine".

"Sixty years of Palestinian dispossession, 40 years of occupation... have left a bitter legacy of disappointment and despair," he said.
He challenged the US to create a different legacy, tying America's moral credibility and its war on terror to a resolution of the Palestinian-Israeli crisis, says the BBC's Jane Little in Washington.

He said there was now a "rare and historic moment of opportunity".

He called for support for a Saudi peace plan drawn up in 2002, which offered collective Arab recognition of Israel in return for a viable Palestinian state.

But he said the US must move fast.

"Nothing can assert America's moral vision more clearly, nothing can reach the world's youth more directly than your leadership in a peace process that delivers results, not next year, not in five years, but this year," he said.

"We need all hands on deck. The international community, especially the US, must be engaged in moving the process forward."

King Abdullah was addressing a joint session of Congress for the first time, but in doing so followed in the footsteps of his father, King Hussein, who spoke in 1994 when, following the Oslo Peace Accords, there was optimism that the Arab-Israeli conflict could be resolved.

"With Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin beside him, he spoke of a new vision for the Middle East. And their courageous work for peace received bipartisan support from your leaders," King Abdullah told US lawmakers.

"Thirteen years later, that work is still not completed. And until it is, we are all at risk."


Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: LadyKD on March 07, 2007, 04:20:47 PM
This is just....this is just Damn!!!!

TREATMENT OF WOUNDED SOLDIERS CRITICIZED
March 7, 2007
Investigative news stories describing inadequate treatment of soldiers wounded in Iraq and Afghanistan have sparked political finger-pointing and the resignation of the top Army official.
Reporters at the Washington Post and Salon.com found that wounded soldiers returning from Iraq and Afghanistan had to fight to get treatment and lived in rooms infested by rats and mold at one of the buildings at Walter Reed Medical Center in Washington, D.C.

Walter Reed, considered a premier treatment center for veterans for nearly a century, housed
outpatients -- patients deemed healthy enough to live without constant medical supervision -- in
rooms with cockroaches, holes in the walls and ceilings, broken elevators and little security.
Army Specialist Jeremy Duncan, who fractured his neck, nearly lost his arm, lost a left ear and sight in his left eye, said, "It wasn't fit for anybody to live in a room like that. ... You've just come out of recovery, you have weaker immune systems. The black mold can do damage to people, the holes in the walls. I wouldn't live there, even if I had to. It wasn't fit for anybody."
Duncan was one of several soldiers who testified before Congress about the situation, along with family members who said they had written to their representatives in Washington for help but never got any.

In the wake of the reports, Walter Reed's commander, Major General George Weightman, was fired, and Army Secretary Francis Harvey resigned under pressure from Defense Secretary Robert Gates. President Bush has ordered a review of conditions at the nation's military and veterans hospitals.

Since the wars began in Afghanistan in 2001 and in Iraq in 2003, Walter Reed has treated over 5,000 wounded servicemen and women, many with brain injuries.
Some estimates found that between 10 percent and 20 percent of the 1.5 million veterans returning from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan suffer a traumatic brain injury, although the U.S.Department of Veterans Affairs says the numbers are not that high.Traumatic brain injury, or TBI, is often the result of improvised explosive devices or IEDs, used by the insurgency in Iraq against American troops and other enemies.

When the bombs explode, the brain is shaken and tissue is damaged. Symptoms range from sensitivity to light and noise to an inability to walk and talk.
The condition is somewhat new because in past wars, without the advanced body armor and other protections, soldiers were more likely to die from such injuries.
"You've got great body armor on, and you don't die," Louis French, a neuropsychologist at Walter Reed, told USA Today. "But there's a whole other set of possible consequences. It's sort of like when they started putting airbags in cars and started seeing all these orthopedic injuries."
 
The treatment of soldiers with brain injuries came under public scrutiny after ABC reporter Bob Woodruff released a documentary "To Iraq and Back" that details his own recovery from a near fatal brain injury suffered in Iraq in January 2006 when his vehicle was struck by an IED.
Many of the families in Woodruff's report expressed frustration at the lack of care TBI patients receive once they leave specialized rehabilitation centers and return home.
Woodruff followed Army Sgt. Michael Boothby back to the soldier's hometown of Comfort,Texas, and showed how Boothby's condition quickly deteriorated while he awaited the arrival of the paperwork that would allow him to continue his treatment.

"I'm saying that our country in general is unprepared. The Department of Defense, the
Department of VA, they're all unprepared for the over 1.6 million veterans who have been through Iraq and Afghanistan, are going to be coming home with injuries, traumatic brain injury," Lieutenant Paul Rieckhoff, head of Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America, an organization that advocates on behalf of troops who are still serving, told the NewsHour Jan. 28.
Following the reports, the Veterans Affairs agency announced that all injured soldiers will be screened for TBI and given the appropriate treatment.
-- Compiled by Annie Schleicher for NewsHour Extra

Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on March 09, 2007, 12:14:55 PM
America, @#!* YEAH!:

 Airbus crisis deepens with plunge into losses

2 hours, 28 minutes ago

Airbus plunged into its first-ever operating loss in 2006 and will be in the red again this year, parent company EADS said Friday in another sign of deepening crisis at the European plane maker.

Analysts at Citigroup investment bank said prospects for Airbus were now "awful" after management warned of vast cost problems and signalled that recovery by rival Boeing was hurting the group.

EADS said Airbus suffered an operating loss of 572 million euros (752 million dollars) in 2006 from an operating profit of 2.3 billion euros in 2005, despite delivering a record 434 aircraft last year.

"Airbus will display another substantial loss in 2007," the European Aeronautic Defence and Space Company said, pointing to more costly gloom ahead and a worsening business environment.

The figures reinforced warnings from Airbus chief executive Louis Gallois that problems were deep and that cutbacks were urgently needed, but he reassured on Friday that the jet maker was not driving EADS into a cash crisis.

"We don't need immediately to raise additional capital because we have a very strong, positive cash position," Gallois, who is also co-chief executive of EADS, told financial news channel CNBC.

EADS shares, which have fallen by about a quarter in value in 12 months, were showing a loss of 4.73 percent to 22.57 euros in mid-afternoon trading in a Paris market that was 0.10 percent stronger.

The main costs in 2007 would arise from a controversial restructuring programme announced by Airbus last week, as well as overruns from its much-delayed A380 superjumbo project and charges from the launch of the mid-range A350 XWB.

EADS finance director Hans-Peter Ring said Airbus losses this year would be about the same as in 2006.

Airbus is also to face headwinds from the weak dollar, falling margins on new aircraft orders and increased research and development spending in 2007.

EADS, which has helicopter, space and defence assets as well as Airbus, reported an 86-percent decline in operating profit to 399 million euros.

Net profit plummeted to 99 million euros compared to 1.676 billion euros in 2005, while sales rose 15 percent to 39.4 billion euros.

"Airbus long-term guidance is awful," said analysts at Citigroup. "Management appears to have capitulated on the long-term outlook."

Airbus acknowledged on Friday that growth in deliveries was slowing amid pressure on the pricing of new orders.

This amounted to evidence that Boeing was gaining market share and was testament to the more modern product range of the US manufacturer, the analysts said.

"We can add to this the enormous FX headwind," they added, referring to the falling dollar against the euro which makes Airbus planes more expensive in international markets.

The Airbus results contrasted sharply with those of Boeing, which made a comeback last year after spending five years behind its European rival in the battle for new orders.

In January, Boeing reported a 14-percent rise in net profit for 2006 to 2.21 billion dollars (1.68 billion euros).

Delays with the A380, the world's biggest civilian airliner which is two years behind schedule, are to cost Airbus more than 5.0 billion euros from 2006-2010, Gallois said earlier this week.

EADS booked a 2.5-billion-euro charge for the A380 during 2006, the main reason for the loss over the year.

Gallois, who is also co-chief executive of EADS, stressed the importance of implementing the "Power8" restructuring plan unveiled in the teeth of opposition from trade unions and politicians last week.

"Airbus has three weaknesses: We need to reduce our costs ... to create a network of partners around us, and integrate Airbus as a complete company, not as a partnership between four national companies," Gallois said after presenting the results on Friday.

The cost-slashing strategy calls for 10,000 job cuts across Europe in the next four years, streamlined production involving the divestment of three factories and a major re-organisation of manufacturing.

The cutbacks face fierce resistance from trade unions, have caused diplomatic tensions between the French and German governments and have become a key campaign issue in the run up to presidential elections in France in April and May.

Airbus was formed in 1970 as an amalgam of British, French, German and Spanish aerospace companies.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20070309/ts_afp/franceaerospace_070309172850
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on March 09, 2007, 12:36:32 PM
Depends on how Boeing is doing.

Also note that this is another instance in which unions have impeded a troubled company's ability to adapt quickly.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on March 09, 2007, 12:51:34 PM
Haha.  I see everything but labor costs as being blamed for the problems that Airbus is in:

inclement forex rates
poor market strategy by management
poor corporate intergration by management
technical delays
R&D costs

Nothing about labor.

Labor is mentioned as a possible obstacle to future change.  Well, yes.  If management screws up and then fires tens of thousands of people, you're bound to see protests don't you think?  That's why labor participation in corporate boards is a good thing. 

Seems more like a current problem:

"Airbus has three weaknesses: We need to reduce our costs ... to create a network of partners around us, and integrate Airbus as a complete company, not as a partnership between four national companies," Gallois said after presenting the results on Friday.

The cost-slashing strategy calls for 10,000 job cuts across Europe in the next four years, streamlined production involving the divestment of three factories and a major re-organisation of manufacturing.

The cutbacks face fierce resistance from trade unions, have caused diplomatic tensions between the French and German governments and have become a key campaign issue in the run up to presidential elections in France in April and May.

Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on March 09, 2007, 01:03:48 PM
Most problems are poor management decisions...doesn't mean unions don't inhibit their ability to adapt to correct those decisions.

But yes, Airbus = European (esp. France) = bad.  Boeing = America = kickass. 8)
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on March 09, 2007, 01:09:37 PM
:D
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on March 13, 2007, 08:24:31 PM
What’s So Funny? Well, Maybe Nothing
By JOHN TIERNEY

So there are these two muffins baking in an oven. One of them yells, “Wow, it’s hot in here!”

And the other muffin replies: “Holy cow! A talking muffin!”

Did that alleged joke make you laugh? I would guess (and hope) not. But under different circumstances, you would be chuckling softly, maybe giggling, possibly guffawing. I know that’s hard to believe, but trust me. The results are just in on a laboratory test of the muffin joke.

Laughter, a topic that stymied philosophers for 2,000 years, is finally yielding to science. Researchers have scanned brains and tickled babies, chimpanzees and rats. They’ve traced the evolution of laughter back to what looks like the primal joke — or, to be precise, the first stand-up routine to kill with an audience of primates.

It wasn’t any funnier than the muffin joke, but that’s not surprising, at least not to the researchers. They’ve discovered something that eluded Plato, Aristotle, Hobbes, Kant, Schopenhauer, Freud and the many theorists who have tried to explain laughter based on the mistaken premise that they’re explaining humor.

Occasionally we’re surprised into laughing at something funny, but most laughter has little to do with humor. It’s an instinctual survival tool for social animals, not an intellectual response to wit. It’s not about getting the joke. It’s about getting along.

When Robert R. Provine tried applying his training in neuroscience to laughter 20 years ago, he naïvely began by dragging people into his laboratory at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, to watch episodes of “Saturday Night Live” and a George Carlin routine. They didn’t laugh much. It was what a stand-up comic would call a bad room.

So he went out into natural habitats — city sidewalks, suburban malls — and carefully observed thousands of “laugh episodes.” He found that 80 percent to 90 percent of them came after straight lines like “I know” or “I’ll see you guys later.” The witticisms that induced laughter rarely rose above the level of “You smell like you had a good workout.”

“Most prelaugh dialogue,” Professor Provine concluded in “Laughter,” his 2000 book, “is like that of an interminable television situation comedy scripted by an extremely ungifted writer.”

He found that most speakers, particularly women, did more laughing than their listeners, using the laughs as punctuation for their sentences. It’s a largely involuntary process. People can consciously suppress laughs, but few can make themselves laugh convincingly.

“Laughter is an honest social signal because it’s hard to fake,” Professor Provine says. “We’re dealing with something powerful, ancient and crude. It’s a kind of behavioral fossil showing the roots that all human beings, maybe all mammals, have in common.”

The human ha-ha evolved from the rhythmic sound — pant-pant — made by primates like chimpanzees when they tickle and chase one other while playing. Jaak Panksepp, a neuroscientist and psychologist at Washington State University, discovered that rats emit an ultrasonic chirp (inaudible to humans without special equipment) when they’re tickled, and they like the sensation so much they keep coming back for more tickling.

He and Professor Provine figure that the first primate joke — that is, the first action to produce a laugh without physical contact — was the feigned tickle, the same kind of coo-chi-coo move parents make when they thrust their wiggling fingers at a baby. Professor Panksepp thinks the brain has ancient wiring to produce laughter so that young animals learn to play with one another. The laughter stimulates euphoria circuits in the brain and also reassures the other animals that they’re playing, not fighting.

“Primal laughter evolved as a signaling device to highlight readiness for friendly interaction,” Professor Panksepp says. “Sophisticated social animals such as mammals need an emotionally positive mechanism to help create social brains and to weave organisms effectively into the social fabric.”

Humans are laughing by the age of four months and then progress from tickling to the Three Stooges to more sophisticated triggers for laughter (or, in some inexplicable cases, to Jim Carrey movies). Laughter can be used cruelly to reinforce a group’s solidarity and pride by mocking deviants and insulting outsiders, but mainly it’s a subtle social lubricant. It’s a way to make friends and also make clear who belongs where in the status hierarchy.

Which brings us back to the muffin joke. It was inflicted by social psychologists at Florida State University on undergraduate women last year, during interviews for what was ostensibly a study of their spending habits. Some of the women were told the interviewer would be awarding a substantial cash prize to a few of the participants, like a boss deciding which underling deserved a bonus.

The women put in the underling position were a lot more likely to laugh at the muffin joke (and others almost as lame) than were women in the control group. But it wasn’t just because these underlings were trying to manipulate the boss, as was demonstrated in a follow-up experiment.

This time each of the women watched the muffin joke being told on videotape by a person who was ostensibly going to be working with her on a task. There was supposed to be a cash reward afterward to be allocated by a designated boss. In some cases the woman watching was designated the boss; in other cases she was the underling or a co-worker of the person on the videotape.

When the woman watching was the boss, she didn’t laugh much at the muffin joke. But when she was the underling or a co-worker, she laughed much more, even though the joke-teller wasn’t in the room to see her. When you’re low in the status hierarchy, you need all the allies you can find, so apparently you’re primed to chuckle at anything even if it doesn’t do you any immediate good.

“Laughter seems to be an automatic response to your situation rather than a conscious strategy,” says Tyler F. Stillman, who did the experiments along with Roy Baumeister and Nathan DeWall. “When I tell the muffin joke to my undergraduate classes, they laugh out loud.”

Mr. Stillman says he got so used to the laughs that he wasn’t quite prepared for the response at a conference in January, although he realizes he should have expected it.

“It was a small conference attended by some of the most senior researchers in the field,” he recalls. “When they heard me, a lowly graduate student, tell the muffin joke, there was a really uncomfortable silence. You could hear crickets.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/03/13/science/13tier.html?em&ex=1173931200&en=4903a79b8cccbd10&ei=5087%0A
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: One Step Ahead on March 13, 2007, 09:37:25 PM
 avoiding that paper, eh?  :D
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on March 13, 2007, 09:46:15 PM
Nah homie.  Good progress tonight: 4 more pages.  I told you I need internet breaks to stay focused.  Time for bed :).
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: One Step Ahead on March 13, 2007, 10:03:47 PM
out of...  ;)
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on March 14, 2007, 05:21:10 AM
I'm in double digits, baby!  Time to work some more.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Statistic on March 14, 2007, 06:53:46 AM
Web Posting Attacks HLS Students
Published On 3/14/2007 1:52:23 AM
By KEVIN ZHOU
Crimson Staff Writer

When law student Stephanie Zarro Avanessian logged onto a popular online message board about law school, she encountered shocking postings that ridiculed her and several other classmates about their appearance and sexual identity.

An anonymous user had posted the derogatory comments to the Web site AutoAdmit—an online message board that claims to be “the most prestigious law school admissions discussion board in the world” on its site.

After eliciting a number of responses from other anonymous users, the thread turned into a graphic and offensive description of her body.

“I think it’s totally sexual harassment,” said Avanessian, a student at Harvard Law School. “They are doing this to gay men, to women, and it’s just awful.”

The postings, which attacked several other students in addition to Avanessian, prompted Law School Dean Elena Kagan to e-mail the student body yesterday exhorting students not to join the discussions.

“I hope all of you will act with professionalism, and of course with simple decency, in turning your backs on this new and highly efficient mechanism for malicious gossip,” Kagan wrote.

The site is host to numerous posts that identify fellow classmates by name and make offensive remarks about physical appearance, race, and sexual identity.

In multiple threads, the posters describe their classmates as “fat,” remark on the size of their breasts, or use ethnic slurs. Two targets of other posts did not respond to repeated requests for comment yesterday.

The president of gay rights group HLS Lambda, Adam R. Sorkin, said he was disturbed by the homophobic tone of many of the threads after doing a search for the word “faggot.”

“I was shocked by the number of posts that used that term in referring to people in a derogatory sense,” he said.

Since employers can follow students through Google and other Web sites, Kagan added in her e-mail that the derogatory posts could cause “repeated damage to their lives and careers.”

Aside from Kagan’s note, the Law School could do little to curb the use of the message board and was not in a position to determine the identities of the anonymous posters, Dean of Students Ellen M. Cosgrove said.

“There’s really nothing else that Harvard Law School can do,” she said. “The individuals have standing if they want to pursue some kind of recourse.”

While students could track down the IP address of the poster on their own, the process typically involves a lot of time and work.

Despite the Law School’s position, students expressed hope that the administration would take action to prevent others from being hurt.

“I thought it was disgusting and reflects really poorly on the Law School and Harvard in general. In some cases there could be some legal actions taken,” said David S. Mitchell, a student representative for Avanessian’s first-year section.

At one point, Avanessian said, the online attacks made her consider withdrawing from her activities at the Law School.

“I had a vision of being at Harvard Law School and being in a community that I could participate in, but now I just think of it as school,” she said.

—Staff writer Kevin Zhou can be reached at kzhou@fas.harvard.edu.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on March 14, 2007, 07:18:55 AM
“I had a vision of being at Harvard Law School and being in a community that I could participate in, but now I just think of it as school,” she said.

Quite the opposite of here.  I was getting e-mails literally every 2 mins this weekend, they had like 3 community meetings about this on Monday, and yesterday, a supermajority of the school was wearing red to show "solidarity."  Lol, almost all of YLS is working to bring down XO (or at least the offending threads).
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Statistic on March 14, 2007, 07:20:58 AM
that's good. It's gotten very disgusting over there recently.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: One Step Ahead on March 14, 2007, 07:21:48 AM
although it is sad that some victims have had to deal with this for years before the outpouring of community support.

Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on March 14, 2007, 07:27:26 AM
I think most people didn't know about it.  Those of us who did had become desensitized, I think.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: One Step Ahead on March 14, 2007, 07:38:21 AM
maybe.  the administration, however, has known for quite some  time.  I can't help but wonder if they had reacted sooner--even if it was just a "lets respect each other" email some of the more invidious attacks would not have occurred.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on March 14, 2007, 07:46:41 AM
Nah.  A.) The one that I find most egregious has been up for 2 years and was posted by a non-YLS student.  B.) Someone would have posted the e-mail and precipated some similar sort of attack.  Maybe some of the pics wouldn't have been posted, but that's probably about it.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: One Step Ahead on March 14, 2007, 07:58:57 AM
A) but also bolstered by students in our school who would send "updates" on the victim--continuing the initial harassment

B)someone would have posted the email definitely, but there would be hesitation from members of our student body to do anything outrageous- knowing the administration would be keeping tabs.  thats all you can really ask for when you are dealing with an irrational mob--place pressure on the vulnerable within your control.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: cui bono? on April 16, 2007, 02:16:39 PM
BLACKSBURG, Virginia (CNN) -- At least 33 people, including a gunman, were killed Monday during shootings in a dorm and a building housing classrooms at Virginia Tech, university officials said.

The death toll makes the incident the deadliest school attack in U.S. history.

Two people were killed at a dormitory about 7:15 a.m., while another 30 people were killed two  hours later at Norris Hall, the engineering science and mechanics building, university officials said.

Though university police Chief Wendell Flinchum said police were still investigating whether the two incidents were related, he also said the gunman at Norris Hall took his own life. Investigators are not ruling out a second shooter, Flinchum said.

"Norris Hall is a tragic and a sorrowful crime scene, and we are in the process of identifying victims," university President Charles Steger said.

Asked why the campus, which caters to more than 26,000 students, was not shut down after the first shooting, Flinchum responded that police received information that "it was an isolated event to that building and the decision was made not to cancel classes at that time."

Steger added, "We had some reason to believe the shooter had left campus."

Spokespersons for hospitals in Roanoke, Christiansburg, Blacksburg and Salem told CNN they were treating 29 people from the shootings.

Sharon Honaker with Carilion New River Medical Center in Christiansburg said one of the four gunshot victims being treated there was in critical condition.

Scott Hill, a spokesman for Montgomery Regional Hospital in Blacksburg, where 17 wounded students were taken, said he wasn't expecting any more victims. (Map of Blacksburg)

The killings mark the deadliest school shooting in U.S. history, surpassing attacks at Columbine High School in 1999 and at the University of Texas in 1966.

The first reported shootings occurred at West Ambler Johnston Hall, a dormitory that houses 895 students. The dormitory, one of the largest residence halls on the 2,600-acre campus, is located near the drill field and stadium. (Campus map)

Amie Steele, editor-in-chief of the campus newspaper, said one of her reporters at the dormitory reported "mass chaos."

The reporter said there were "lots of students running around, going crazy, and the police officers were trying to settle everyone down and keep everything under control," according to Steele.

Kristyn Heiser said she was in class about 9:30 a.m. when she and her classmates saw about six gun-wielding police officers run by a window.

"We were like, 'What's going on?' Because this definitely is a quaint town where stuff doesn't really happen. It's pretty boring here," said Heiser during a phone interview as she sat on her classroom floor.

Another student, Tiffany Otey, said she and her classmates initially thought the gunshots were construction noise until they heard screaming and police officers with bulletproof vests and machine guns entered her classroom.

"They were telling us to put our hands above our head and if we didn't cooperate and put our hands above our heads they would shoot," Otey said. "I guess they were afraid, like us, like the shooter was going to be among one of us."

Student reports 'mayhem'
Student Matt Waldron said he did not hear the gunshots because he was listening to music, but he heard police sirens and saw officers hiding behind trees with their guns drawn.

"They told us to get out of there so we ran across the drill field as quick as we could," he said.

Waldron described the scene on campus as "mayhem."

"It was kind of scary," he said. "These two kids I guess had panicked and jumped out of the top-story window and the one kid broke his ankle and the other girl was not in good shape just lying on the ground."

Madison Van Duyne said she and her classmates in a media writing class were on "lockdown" in their classrooms. They were huddled in the middle of the classroom, writing stories about the shootings and posting them online.

The university is updating its students through e-mails, and an Internet webcam is broadcasting live pictures of the campus.

The shootings came three days after a bomb threat Friday forced the cancellation of classes in three buildings, WDBJ in Roanoke reported. Also, the 100,000-square-foot Torgersen Hall was evacuated April 2 after police received a written bomb threat, The Roanoke Times reported.

Last August, the first day of classes was cut short by a manhunt after an escaped prisoner was accused of killing a security guard at a Blacksburg hospital and a sheriff's deputy.

After the Monday shootings, students were instructed to stay indoors and away from windows, police at the university said.

("Virginia Tech has canceled all classes. Those on campus are asked to remain where they are, lock their doors and stay away from windows. Persons off campus are asked not to come to campus," a statement on the university Web site said.

The university has scheduled a convocation for 2 p.m. ET Tuesday. Classes also have been canceled Tuesday. In Washington, the House and Senate observed moments of silence for the victims and President Bush said the nation was "shocked and saddened" by news of the tragedy

"Today, our nation grieves with those who have lost loved ones," he said. "We hold the victims in our hearts, we lift them up in our prayers and we ask a loving God to comfort those who are suffering today."

Before Monday, the deadliest school shootings came in 1966 and 1999.

In the former, Charles Joseph Whitman, a 25-year-old ex-Marine, killed 13 people on the University of Texas campus. He was killed by police.

In 1999, 17-year-old Dylan Klebold and 18-year-old Eric Harris -- armed with guns and pipe bombs -- killed 12 students and a teacher before killing themselves at Columbine High School in Littleton, Colorado.

Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: cui bono? on April 17, 2007, 12:13:33 PM
Text of Warning E-Mails Sent on Campus
AP
(April 17) - Timeline and text of e-mails sent out Monday by Virginia Tech  to students and staff after the first 911 call at 7:15 a.m. reporting a shooting in West Ambler Johnston dormitory:

- E-mail sent at 9:26 a.m.:

Subject: Shooting on campus.

"A shooting incident occurred at West Amber Johnston earlier this morning. Police are on the scene and are investigating.

"The university community is urged to be cautious and are asked to contact Virginia Tech Police if you observe anything suspicious or with information on the case. Contact Virginia Tech Police at 231-6411

"Stay attuned to the www.vt.edu. We will post as soon as we have more information."

- 9:15 a.m.: Approximate time of second shooting at Norris Hall.

- E-mail sent at 9:50 a.m.:

Subject: PLease stay put

"A gunman is loose on campus. Stay in buildings until further notice. Stay away from all windows"

- Third e-mail sent at 10:17 a.m.:

Subject: All Classes Canceled; Stay where you are

"Virginia Tech has canceled all classes. Those on campus are asked to remain where there are, lock their doors and stay away from windows. Persons off campus are asked not to come to campus."

- Fourth e-mail sent at 10:53 a.m.:

Subject: Second Shooting Reported; Police have one gunman in custody

"In addition to an earlier shooting today in West Ambler Johnston, there has been a multiple shooting with multiple victims in Norris Hall.

"Police and EMS are on the scene.

"Police have one shooter in custody and as part of routine police procedure, they continue to search for a second shooter.

"All people in university buildings are required to stay inside until further notice.

"All entrances to campus are closed."

Source: Virginia Tech


Copyright 2007 The Associated Press. The information contained in the AP news report may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or otherwise distributed without the prior written authority of The Associated Press. All active hyperlinks have been inserted by AOL.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: 7S on April 18, 2007, 01:59:41 PM
Divestment movement dealt a blow
Official says measures can't require state pension funds to sell holdings on moral grounds.
Click-2-Listen
By Robert Elder

AMERICAN-STATESMAN STAFF


Wednesday, April 18, 2007

Legislation that would require state pension funds to sell holdings based on moral grounds violates the Texas Constitution, the office of Attorney General Greg Abbott said Tuesday.

Several so-called divestment bills are pending in the Legislature, including ones targeting corporations doing business in Sudan and Iran, and another that would prohibit state investment funds from investing in toll roads.

David Mattax, chief of the attorney general's financial litigation division, didn't address specific legislation in testimony before the House Pensions and Investments Committee. But he said any legislation that requires the sale of investments clashes with the state constitution's requirement that pension funds be managed with "ordinary prudence, discretion and intelligence" for the benefit of pensioners.

Mattax said the Legislature can limit investments — ordering a fund to switch to investment-grade debt from "junk" bonds, for instance — but it cannot make trustees violate their fiduciary duties by selling certain stocks or other securities.

Divestment legislation generally "makes the board imprudent," Mattax said. "That's sort of what is raised by these divestiture bills."

Mattax also said the constitution is "very clear" that after state money or member contributions go into a pension system, "the Texas Legislature has no authority over that money."

Pension fund assets are "solely for the benefit of members," Mattax said, "and any divestiture bill runs the potential of being unconstitutional because it is in effect a diversion of funds."

Mattax's testimony could cool the divestment movement because it gives opponents a ready-made legal argument and the unofficial view, at least, of a high-ranking assistant attorney general.

But state Sen. Rodney Ellis, D-Houston, author of this session's most comprehensive divestment legislation, which targets Sudan, said Mattax's testimony reminds him of what a judge told him when he served a clerkship: "That is why we call it a damn opinion, not a decision."

"It's his opinion and he's entitled to it," Ellis said, but at this point it is nothing more.

Ellis' legislation, which the Senate approved last month, requires the state teachers and employees retirement systems to compile a watch list of companies shown to be doing business in Sudan, where Arab militias backed by the Sudanese government have carried out a campaign of genocide against residents of the country's Darfur region.

The state's two major pension funds, which together total $132 billion, hold about $700 million in shares in companies on various Sudan watch lists.

The pension fund would have to begin "engagement" with a company on the list, and if that dialogue doesn't result in the company leaving Sudan, the fund would have to sell its shares over a period.

Regardless of the legal arguments, Ellis said he expects pension fund trustees to follow his legislation's guidelines if it becomes law.

"I'm convinced those trustees don't want blood on their hands" by refusing to sell shares of companies doing business in Sudan, he said.

If they don't, Ellis said, the state's pension fund trustees can expect retaliation from him and like-minded senators.

"They will have a tough road to hoe on any issue that comes up involving those pension funds or any confirmation proceedings" for trustees, Ellis said. "Any opportunity I have to rake them over the coals, I'm going to exercise it, and I don't think I'll be alone."

Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: One Step Ahead on May 03, 2007, 09:20:37 AM
The guy who ran xo just had his offer rescinded:

http://blogs.wsj.com/law/2007/05/03/law-firm-rescinds-offer-to-ex-autoadmit-director/
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Boalt 2010 on May 03, 2007, 09:42:21 AM
The guy who ran xo just had his offer rescinded:

http://blogs.wsj.com/law/2007/05/03/law-firm-rescinds-offer-to-ex-autoadmit-director/

he's 23?  good lord i feel old.  i'm 27 and i haven't even STARTED law school.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Inquirer on May 03, 2007, 09:44:21 AM
The guy who ran xo just had his offer rescinded:

http://blogs.wsj.com/law/2007/05/03/law-firm-rescinds-offer-to-ex-autoadmit-director/

Sorry for ya'!
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on May 03, 2007, 10:07:59 AM
I actually don't think he should have been fired.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Special Agent Dana Scully on May 03, 2007, 10:14:50 AM
I actually don't think he should have been fired.

I agree.  Everyone knew who the kid was--he made no secret of who he is and that he runs the site.  The firm hired him for 2L summer and asked him back despite automadmit and all the flack the site has been getting for the last few years.  Now they want to fire him bc of the YLS thing?  There's been worse on there to be sure and he didn't have probs getting a gig before...
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Boalt 2010 on May 03, 2007, 10:17:16 AM
I actually don't think he should have been fired.

I agree.  Everyone knew who the kid was--he made no secret of who he is and that he runs the site.  The firm hired him for 2L summer and asked him back despite automadmit and all the flack the site has been getting for the last few years.  Now they want to fire him bc of the YLS thing?  There's been worse on there to be sure and he didn't have probs getting a gig before...

1. they might not have been aware of the type of content on autoadmit.  they might just have thought, "oh that's cute, he's an admin for an internet forum!"  i mean not everyone researches their hires obsessively.

2. it raises the board's profile, and his as well.  i don't think this is something being done on principle so much as a protecting the firm's interests reaction.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Special Agent Dana Scully on May 03, 2007, 10:19:57 AM
I actually don't think he should have been fired.

I agree.  Everyone knew who the kid was--he made no secret of who he is and that he runs the site.  The firm hired him for 2L summer and asked him back despite automadmit and all the flack the site has been getting for the last few years.  Now they want to fire him bc of the YLS thing?  There's been worse on there to be sure and he didn't have probs getting a gig before...

1. they might not have been aware of the type of content on autoadmit.  they might just have thought, "oh that's cute, he's an admin for an internet forum!"  i mean not everyone researches their hires obsessively.

2. it raises the board's profile, and his as well.  i don't think this is something being done on principle so much as a protecting the firm's interests reaction.

Believe me, a lot of ppl know about xo...they just dont' like to admit that they read it.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Boalt 2010 on May 03, 2007, 10:20:22 AM
I actually don't think he should have been fired.

Go on....

It all goes back to the lightpost analogy!

Dude. That might work for whether or not he should be sued. But whether or not a firm wants to let him go? I don't care if they're being hypocritical or not. It's easy to see that this could cause people to not want to work with him, or not look good for the firm's image, and those both seem like reason enough. And he's not fired. He's just not hired.

Yeah...I honestly think it's a smart move for the firm (risk > reward) but I feel bad for him. I don't think he should have been fired (or have his offer rescinded) but I'd do the same thing if I was were in charge.

Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Boalt 2010 on May 03, 2007, 10:21:28 AM
I actually don't think he should have been fired.

I agree.  Everyone knew who the kid was--he made no secret of who he is and that he runs the site.  The firm hired him for 2L summer and asked him back despite automadmit and all the flack the site has been getting for the last few years.  Now they want to fire him bc of the YLS thing?  There's been worse on there to be sure and he didn't have probs getting a gig before...

1. they might not have been aware of the type of content on autoadmit.  they might just have thought, "oh that's cute, he's an admin for an internet forum!"  i mean not everyone researches their hires obsessively.

2. it raises the board's profile, and his as well.  i don't think this is something being done on principle so much as a protecting the firm's interests reaction.

Believe me, a lot of ppl know about xo...they just dont' like to admit that they read it.

maybe the people he interviewed with were the ones who: 1) didn't care or 2) were old enough that they didn't know about such things?

i'm just throwing out hypotheticals.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Special Agent Dana Scully on May 03, 2007, 10:29:53 AM
I actually don't think he should have been fired.

I agree.  Everyone knew who the kid was--he made no secret of who he is and that he runs the site.  The firm hired him for 2L summer and asked him back despite automadmit and all the flack the site has been getting for the last few years.  Now they want to fire him bc of the YLS thing?  There's been worse on there to be sure and he didn't have probs getting a gig before...

1. they might not have been aware of the type of content on autoadmit.  they might just have thought, "oh that's cute, he's an admin for an internet forum!"  i mean not everyone researches their hires obsessively.

2. it raises the board's profile, and his as well.  i don't think this is something being done on principle so much as a protecting the firm's interests reaction.

Believe me, a lot of ppl know about xo...they just dont' like to admit that they read it.

maybe the people he interviewed with were the ones who: 1) didn't care or 2) were old enough that they didn't know about such things?

i'm just throwing out hypotheticals.

2 could work--but if they knew and didn't care then then they shouldn't care now.  they just want to cover their asses, which is fine, but still...
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Boalt 2010 on May 03, 2007, 10:31:08 AM
I actually don't think he should have been fired.

I agree.  Everyone knew who the kid was--he made no secret of who he is and that he runs the site.  The firm hired him for 2L summer and asked him back despite automadmit and all the flack the site has been getting for the last few years.  Now they want to fire him bc of the YLS thing?  There's been worse on there to be sure and he didn't have probs getting a gig before...

1. they might not have been aware of the type of content on autoadmit.  they might just have thought, "oh that's cute, he's an admin for an internet forum!"  i mean not everyone researches their hires obsessively.

2. it raises the board's profile, and his as well.  i don't think this is something being done on principle so much as a protecting the firm's interests reaction.

Believe me, a lot of ppl know about xo...they just dont' like to admit that they read it.

maybe the people he interviewed with were the ones who: 1) didn't care or 2) were old enough that they didn't know about such things?

i'm just throwing out hypotheticals.

2 could work--but if they knew and didn't care then then they shouldn't care now.  they just want to cover their asses, which is fine, but still...

well to be fair xoxo's profile is considerably higher in the wake of the wapo article...
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: Special Agent Dana Scully on May 03, 2007, 10:49:34 AM
I actually don't think he should have been fired.

I agree.  Everyone knew who the kid was--he made no secret of who he is and that he runs the site.  The firm hired him for 2L summer and asked him back despite automadmit and all the flack the site has been getting for the last few years.  Now they want to fire him bc of the YLS thing?  There's been worse on there to be sure and he didn't have probs getting a gig before...

1. they might not have been aware of the type of content on autoadmit.  they might just have thought, "oh that's cute, he's an admin for an internet forum!"  i mean not everyone researches their hires obsessively.

2. it raises the board's profile, and his as well.  i don't think this is something being done on principle so much as a protecting the firm's interests reaction.

Believe me, a lot of ppl know about xo...they just dont' like to admit that they read it.

maybe the people he interviewed with were the ones who: 1) didn't care or 2) were old enough that they didn't know about such things?

i'm just throwing out hypotheticals.

2 could work--but if they knew and didn't care then then they shouldn't care now.  they just want to cover their asses, which is fine, but still...

well to be fair xoxo's profile is considerably higher in the wake of the wapo article...

true but they've done/said shittier things than this...
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on May 03, 2007, 11:19:56 AM
I actually don't think he should have been fired.

Let the market do its thing, no?

Of course.  The firm had every right to fire him, and other firms would be justified in not hiring him.

I'm just not a big fan of vicarious liability.  He didn't post the stuff; he just (supposedly) let it remain on the site.  I'm generally not a fan of holding accountable those not directly responsible.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: kenny32 on May 03, 2007, 11:25:47 AM
http://news.aol.com/topnews/articles/_a/judge-sues-cleaner-for-65-million-over/20070503071409990001?ncid=NWS00010000000001
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on May 03, 2007, 12:58:04 PM
I actually don't think he should have been fired.

Let the market do its thing, no?

Of course.  The firm had every right to fire him, and other firms would be justified in not hiring him.

I'm just not a big fan of vicarious liability.  He didn't post the stuff; he just (supposedly) let it remain on the site.  I'm generally not a fan of holding accountable those not directly responsible.

I'd taken you for a fan of the least-cost avoider principle: who should absorb the negative externalities of his decision not to remove that content?

The least-cost avoider is the person who posts the information.  He should absorb the engative externalities of his postings.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on May 03, 2007, 01:30:22 PM

I'd taken you for a fan of the least-cost avoider principle: who should absorb the negative externalities of his decision not to remove that content?

The least-cost avoider is the person who posts the information.  He should absorb the engative externalities of his postings.

That's a sidestep of my question, Alci.  ;)

Lol, no.  I'm just reframing the issue away from your biased framing ;).  The negative externalities emanate from the postings...and only incidentally from his decision not to remove the postings.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: One Step Ahead on May 03, 2007, 01:41:34 PM
I actually don't think he should have been fired.

Let the market do its thing, no?

Of course.  The firm had every right to fire him, and other firms would be justified in not hiring him.

I'm just not a big fan of vicarious liability.  He didn't post the stuff; he just (supposedly) let it remain on the site.  I'm generally not a fan of holding accountable those not directly responsible.

I'd taken you for a fan of the least-cost avoider principle: who should absorb the negative externalities of his decision not to remove that content?

The least-cost avoider is the person who posts the information.  He should absorb the engative externalities of his postings.

not when the board administrators go out of their way to assure that such posters will never be outed.

just desserts.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on May 03, 2007, 01:45:36 PM
I'm sure they would have been outted if the gov't had become involved...but they didn't...because what he did wasn't illegal.

Anyway, I have better things to do than defend/feel sorry for Anthony Ciolli.  I'm definitely never becoming a moderator of a public forum, though.  Sands, you have fun with that ;).
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: One Step Ahead on May 03, 2007, 01:54:24 PM
I'm sure they would have been outted if the gov't had become involved...but they didn't...because what he did wasn't illegal.

Anyway, I have better things to do than defend/feel sorry for Anthony Ciolli.  I'm definitely never becoming a moderator of a public forum, though.  Sands, you have fun with that ;).

now you are just being naive--the government doesn't become involved each time the law is broken.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on May 03, 2007, 03:02:49 PM
I'm sure they would have been outted if the gov't had become involved...but they didn't...because what he did wasn't illegal.

Anyway, I have better things to do than defend/feel sorry for Anthony Ciolli.  I'm definitely never becoming a moderator of a public forum, though.  Sands, you have fun with that ;).

now you are just being naive--the government doesn't become involved each time the law is broken.

The gov't becomes involved if what he did was illegal /= The gov't must become involved if what he did was illegal.  But the gov't becomes involved only if what he did was illegal, or potentially so.  And what he did was not.  Thank you.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on May 03, 2007, 03:06:26 PM
This is sad:

http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2007/05/03/BAGPSPJR8D1.DTL&hw=25+to+life&sn=004&sc=686

SAN FRANCISCO
Mentally ill man's 3-strikes sentence upheld
Thief received term of 25 years to life for stealing liquor


What's so sad about this?  If, after 2 tries, he can't conform his behavior to societal standards of acceptability, then he should be locked away.  Why should he be allowed to repeat the behavior even more?
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on May 03, 2007, 03:10:13 PM
You're looking at the crime in isolation.  The statute views it as one in a series of serious crimes.  I think 2 times is more than enough to conform your behavior.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on May 03, 2007, 03:18:55 PM
You're looking at the crime in isolation.  The statute views it as one in a series of serious crimes. I think 2 times is more than enough to conform your behavior.

When you're a schizophrenic?

Why should that be an excuse?  If anything, that's even more of a reason to lock him up (where he can get forced treatment), because he's predisposed to uncontrollable antisocial behavior.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on May 03, 2007, 03:23:15 PM
You're looking at the crime in isolation.  The statute views it as one in a series of serious crimes. I think 2 times is more than enough to conform your behavior.

When you're a schizophrenic?

Why should that be an excuse?  If anything, that's even more of a reason to lock him up (where he can get forced treatment), because he's predisposed to uncontrollable antisocial behavior.

Are you ignoring my first point?

What? The failing prison system?  Fix the system; don't let people who are almost guaranteed to commit crimes again go free.

Quote
If he were actually going to get treatment, that would be great. And it would be an "excuse" in the sense that with treatment he would probably be a lot less likely to do it again.

But obviously he's not going to get the treatment on his own...he's had 2 previous times to try that.  And we don't need people out committing crimes just because they're crazy.  So lock him up.

Lol, you must be heated...I don't think I've ever seen anyone respond so quickly.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on May 03, 2007, 03:33:50 PM
Yeah, your economic argument is compelling...except that if we allow him to go free, that will signal to other relatively petty criminals that their behavior is OK.  Thus, the cost of imprisoning him for the rest of his life is likely less than the aggregate of all of the "minor" crimes that would occur if he were set free.

ETA: and I know that locking him up probably won't deter future schizophrenics, but maybe it will make their relatives force them to get treatment...or something like that.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: One Step Ahead on May 03, 2007, 11:14:02 PM
I'm sure they would have been outted if the gov't had become involved...but they didn't...because what he did wasn't illegal.

Anyway, I have better things to do than defend/feel sorry for Anthony Ciolli.  I'm definitely never becoming a moderator of a public forum, though.  Sands, you have fun with that ;).

now you are just being naive--the government doesn't become involved each time the law is broken.

The gov't becomes involved if what he did was illegal /= The gov't must become involved if what he did was illegal.  But the gov't becomes involved only if what he did was illegal, or potentially so.  And what he did was not.  Thank you.

your circular logic is not welcome.  the gov't did not get involved because of the institutional low stakes--that doesn't mean illegal activity didn't occur.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on May 04, 2007, 05:24:22 AM
My logic isn't circular.  It would be circular if I had said that what he had done wasn't illegal because the gov't didn't get involved.  But I didn't.  I said that the gov't didn't get involved because what he did was not illegal.  The illegality is not premised on the gov't becoming involved, but the gov't becoming involved is premised on the illegality.

As for your institutional low stakes, that's a very weak argument for which you have no proof.  Show me his illegal activity.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: One Step Ahead on May 04, 2007, 06:24:00 AM
It is circular.  You don't know why the government didn't get involved.  heck I downloaded a song a few years ago and the government didn't get involved.  Does that tell you anything about its permissibility?

Moreover, I do not need to show you his "illegal activity"--I'm not a prosecutor and you are not the jury.  There are several causes of action that have been repeated ad naseum in other conversations we've had. I have no desire to hash them out, but conspiracy in and facilitation of crimes still subject one to liability.

Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on May 04, 2007, 06:31:28 AM
It is circular.  You don't know why the government didn't get involved.  heck I downloaded a song a few years ago and the government didn't get involved.  Does that tell you anything about its permissibility?

That's not circular reasoning.  My saying his action wasn't illegal is just an unsupported premise.  I never used gov't noninvolvement to support that premise.  If you're going to attack the premise, fine (even though it's more likely than yours), but the reasoning isn't circular.

Quote
Moreover, I do not need to show you his "illegal activity"--I'm not a prosecutor and you are not the jury.  There are several causes of action that have been repeated ad naseum in other conversations we've had. I have no desire to hash them out, but conspiracy in and facilitation of crimes still subject one to liability.

The "crime" being what?  Last I heard, any potential violation would only be civil.
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: One Step Ahead on May 04, 2007, 06:58:06 AM
Blackmail
Fraud
Identity Theft
Stalking
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: A. on May 04, 2007, 07:01:11 AM
Those are all weak at best.  But I don't really care about this anyway.  I just wanted to win the logic argument, which I did ;).
Title: Re: Post Your Interesting News Articles Here
Post by: One Step Ahead on May 04, 2007, 07:08:02 AM
actually you lose because you admitted you made a presumption that when challenged in the end obliterates your argument.

And as I've just proved that there are indeed crimal activities that allegedly or arguably occurred. I win.