Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
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 91 
 on: August 17, 2014, 01:46:35 PM 
Started by LSAT Blog - Last post by @_@
Wow - a lot of questions there!

What do you mean by "prelaw type questions?"
stuff relevant to the law
they do have prelaw majors (but almost no law students actually take them)

 92 
 on: August 17, 2014, 01:45:05 PM 
Started by Niques - Last post by @_@
Online, I imagine, mostly; other non-ABA schools.
If they accept that low, why require it at all?

 93 
 on: August 17, 2014, 07:35:59 AM 
Started by lawapp - Last post by LSAT Blog
It's a relatively recent change on LSAC's part, so I haven't heard the concrete results of anyone who asked yet. (It used to be much easier - you could just ask a law school to grant an appeal.)

Best way to find out is to go ahead and appeal to LSAC - and let us know what you find!




 94 
 on: August 17, 2014, 03:55:10 AM 
Started by lawapp - Last post by lawapp
I took lsat 3 times recently with cancel-160s-160s. Underperformed in the last test and am disappointed.
The two-year rule will permit me next take next Dec.

Anyone has had success appealing to LSAC for 4th take?
I miss admission cycles for my target schools if I don't get take now. Does lsac consider it a reason for retake?

 95 
 on: August 16, 2014, 07:06:23 AM 
Started by Niques - Last post by Groundhog
Online, I imagine, mostly; other non-ABA schools.

 96 
 on: August 16, 2014, 07:05:36 AM 
Started by livekhaos - Last post by Groundhog
I think the toughest part is not just your GPA but your lack of courses for credit. Whether unfair or not, the credit by exam does not reflect academic learning and there can be a certain lack of rigor associated with credit/no credit courses.

As others have said, you are a splitter, but this is complicated by the fact that so few courses for credit doesn't really tell much of a story in terms of academic history.

Provided you meet the requirements, you will likely be admitted to an ABA program with that LSAT score, but I'd definitely focus on discussing your businesses in your application. From an admissions perspective, other than your LSAT, that is the strongest component of your application. As you noted, you are a little older than some, so this would fit in well with that profile.

Good luck!

 97 
 on: August 15, 2014, 06:00:36 PM 
Started by livekhaos - Last post by livekhaos
I'm familiar with those schools, they're among the oldest and best established distance learning programs.
If you plan to remain in NY/NJ you could look at CUNY, NYLS, Touro, St. John's, maybe Seton Hall and Rutgers. As a splitter, you might want to apply to lots of schools and just see what happens. Like I said before, it's harder to predict.

Good Luck!

Thank you Maintain. I appreciate all of your words.

 98 
 on: August 15, 2014, 12:54:03 PM 
Started by LSAT Blog - Last post by LSAT Blog
Wow - a lot of questions there!

What do you mean by "prelaw type questions?"

 99 
 on: August 15, 2014, 12:24:13 PM 
Started by livekhaos - Last post by Maintain FL 350
I'm familiar with those schools, they're among the oldest and best established distance learning programs.
If you plan to remain in NY/NJ you could look at CUNY, NYLS, Touro, St. John's, maybe Seton Hall and Rutgers. As a splitter, you might want to apply to lots of schools and just see what happens. Like I said before, it's harder to predict.

Good Luck!

 100 
 on: August 15, 2014, 10:25:14 AM 
Started by livekhaos - Last post by livekhaos
@Maintain

Thank you for your response. No offense taken. I actually attend Excelsior College in New York. It's a Regionally Accred school that let's you test out of most of your degree requirements. Very similar to Thomas Edison State College in NJ and Charter Oak State College in CT. These schools are called the "Big 3". They all offer solid online programs.

I'd like to think that I have a great deal of self-discipline when I want/need to as a majority of my degree is from self-taught coursework.

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