Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
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 91 
 on: September 26, 2014, 09:43:26 PM 
Started by passaroa25 - Last post by I.M.D.Law
http://www.bppe.ca.gov/
they must have brought it back, its still a f-ing pathetic joke though

 92 
 on: September 26, 2014, 09:42:41 PM 
Started by jonlevy - Last post by I.M.D.Law
Again, I refer you to my previous post
it pains me how simple this is

 93 
 on: September 26, 2014, 09:09:32 PM 
Started by passaroa25 - Last post by jonlevy
http://www.bppe.ca.gov/

 94 
 on: September 26, 2014, 08:59:23 PM 
Started by jonlevy - Last post by jonlevy
The notice states that the communication may contain privileged information for the intended recipient, and that disclosure "by others" is prohibited.

Since Jonlevy was the intended recipient, I think this means he is free to disclose it's contents. Others cannot disclose it without his permission. Read the notice more carefully.

Bingo, you win the prize.

This the one I use on my emails:

This e-mail is confidential. If you are not the intended recipient then you must not copy it, forward it, use it for any purpose, or disclose it to another person. Instead please return it to the sender immediately. Please then delete your copy from your system.

 95 
 on: September 26, 2014, 05:59:11 PM 
Started by almighty - Last post by I.M.D.Law
consider military, you can enlist as a paralegal as an officer in JAG even with just undergrad
This is incorrect.  JAG paralegals are enlisted, which means that they are not officers and are outranked by every 21-year-old ROTC graduate fresh out of college. Some eventually have the opportunity to become legal administrators, which is a warrant officer position, but only for those who go career non-commission officer.

Serving in the military has many benefits, but enlisting to become a JAG paralegal in the hopes of helping with law school admissions is a bit extreme and won't necessarily help OP. It might not be fun being treated like a 17-year-old kid who barely finished high school. Also, it'd be at least 4 years before he could apply again to law school.
I wasn't attached to JAG, so I will take your word for that. I will post a link to the MOS that officers can do.
http://usmilitary.about.com/od/army/l/blofficermos.htm
OP could go enlisted in the National Guard and have that pay for law school if they wanted to do paralegal (or officer too in another MOS)
http://www.nationalguard.com/27d-paralegal-specialist
OP was posting about CASA and other stuff too, so let's be fair about OP was asking about

 96 
 on: September 26, 2014, 03:52:20 PM 
Started by Iching - Last post by IlLogicalKurt
It seems like this is something people struggle with (at least from what I have read). I see similar problems in my pt's, but at this point have essentially given up on timing myself until I feel like my grasp of RC q's, finding where the q's will likely be, etc. rises. Keep reading and stay positive. That's what I am doing, and I am noticing improvements.

Still miss more main point questions than any other question. I notice I get caught up in the jargon they testmakers use. any help with those in particular other than just saying "main point questions ask you to find the main point" ...

 97 
 on: September 26, 2014, 03:02:22 PM 
Started by flhelms - Last post by IlLogicalKurt
Why?

 98 
 on: September 26, 2014, 02:41:03 PM 
Started by emilyellenwilliams - Last post by Maintain FL 350
Maintain FL -- thanks for your words of advice. I have done quite a bit of research at this point and am (unfortunately) very confident that I would have to start over with a JD, especially in Florida. The very best that you can do here is find a university that will award you some credits from your past studies and shave a maximum of a year off the JD study time. Thus, my principal concerns are finding working with an LLB/LLM.

Is it possible that FL would allow you sit for the bar exam if you obtained an LL.M from a ABA school? Or do they actually require the JD?
 
Either way, it's a couple of years of your life, but I think you can at least complete an ABA LL.M online which would allow you to work during that time and minimize debt.

As far as finding work in the U.S. with a German LL.B, I think it would be tough. Firms that practice international might be interested, but they'll likely want someone who is admitted to the bar as well.

Just think about your long term goals, be realistic in your expectations, and let that guide your decision making.

 99 
 on: September 26, 2014, 02:10:30 PM 
Started by almighty - Last post by Groundhog
consider military, you can enlist as a paralegal as an officer in JAG even with just undergrad
This is incorrect.  JAG paralegals are enlisted, which means that they are not officers and are outranked by every 21-year-old ROTC graduate fresh out of college. Some eventually have the opportunity to become legal administrators, which is a warrant officer position, but only for those who go career non-commission officer.

Serving in the military has many benefits, but enlisting to become a JAG paralegal in the hopes of helping with law school admissions is a bit extreme and won't necessarily help OP. It might not be fun being treated like a 17-year-old kid who barely finished high school. Also, it'd be at least 4 years before he could apply again to law school.

 100 
 on: September 26, 2014, 12:19:34 PM 
Started by emilyellenwilliams - Last post by emilyellenwilliams
Thanks for your responses.

In terms of same-sex partner, Germany has allowed residency for same-sex partners for 15 years and is very progressive on this. If we were to get married, my girlfriend's German company would even fund part of my relocation. But that's aside from the point, because ideally I would want to be independent in this transition, and would be immigrating based on admission into a law program.

Maintain FL -- thanks for your words of advice. I have done quite a bit of research at this point and am (unfortunately) very confident that I would have to start over with a JD, especially in Florida. The very best that you can do here is find a university that will award you some credits from your past studies and shave a maximum of a year off the JD study time. Thus, my principal concerns are finding working with an LLB/LLM.

I've spoken with the embassies at length and know what it entails officially. It is possible to gain residency after schooling is completed, but as you mention, my greatest concern is how realistic that actually is. Right now, they have a system in place where you have to find work within so many months of graduating, and work earning a minimum of 46,000 euros per year, in order to be able to stay. Of course, I may have gotten married by that point anyway. But you bring up a great point! I need to know really how the legal job outlook is there, and what my chances are that employers will see me as a valuable asset in a congested job market.

Thanks for bringing up some great points.

Emily

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