Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
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 91 
 on: January 02, 2015, 06:17:22 PM 
Started by XalandX - Last post by Maintain FL 350
Take a look at the admissions information available on LSAC's "Official Guide to U.S. Law Schools". It will give you a very good indication as to your chances.

That said, with a 141 LSAT you stand a statistically very low (perhaps nonexistent) chance at USD and CW, maybe marginally better at TJ. You can go ahead and apply, but I see a retake in your future.

Try to identify the specific reasons that you had trouble this time, and focus on fixing them.

Good Luck!

 92 
 on: January 02, 2015, 01:06:26 AM 
Started by XalandX - Last post by barprephero
Sorry to hear that. Honestly you likely just had a bad day. It happens.
I say RETAKE the exam.

The only places that will accept a 141 are non aba schools, and you do NOT want to end up in one of those.

 93 
 on: January 01, 2015, 10:10:39 PM 
Started by XalandX - Last post by XalandX
Okay so I received my LSAT score and I did not feel confident about my score walking out of the LSAT but I never imagined doing this bad! I would score low 150's in my diagnostic tests I guess the nerves just got the best of me. Nevertheless, I want to go to law school in San Diego. I am planning to apply to Cal Western, Thomas Jefferson, and USD school of law. I know with my score I may have no other choice but to retake the Feb LSAT but do I have a shot at any of these three law schools? Any input would be appreciated thanks!

 94 
 on: December 31, 2014, 04:19:02 PM 
Started by jonlevy - Last post by barprephero
I don't think they have the authority to go after Novus since its not in Texas. Texas used to have DETC schools on that list too (I'm told) until they figured out that the US Dept of Education approved them. I think some of the schools still on that list are state approved unaccredited ones from out of state.

Basically, its only illegal if you have them and use them in Texas as far as Texas is concerned. I could see Texas filing a similar law suit since Novus is creating the problem for them by producing the degrees. My guess is they just don't the time or resources to bother with that. If you volunteered to do it probono I bet they'd consider it though. It would get your name in print.

 95 
 on: December 31, 2014, 09:19:24 AM 
Started by jonlevy - Last post by jonlevy
Illegal to use? I think you mean Novus is on the list of diploma mills however obviously that is not criminal or they would be prosecuted since they are not hard to find.
It varies by state. And it is what it is.
I'll post a link as an example. Don't presume, its a dangerous thing.
http://www.thecb.state.tx.us/index.cfm?objectid=EF4C3C3B-EB44-4381-6673F760B3946FBB

Institutions Whose Degrees are Illegal to Use in Texas

Consonant with its responsibilities under Chapter 61 of the Texas Education Code and rules promulgated pursuant thereto, the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board annually reviews the institutions included on this list.

"Fraudulent or substandard degree" means a degree conferred in Texas in violation of the Texas Education Code; conferred in another state in violation of that state's laws; conferred in another state by an institution that was not accredited by an accreditor recognized by the Coordinating Board and that has not been approved by the Coordinating Board for its degrees to be used in Texas; or conferred outside the United States by an institution that the Coordinating Board determines is not the equivalent of an accredited or authorized degree. (Texas Educational Code, Chapter 61, Section 61.302)

The Texas Penal Code (Section 32.52) prohibits the use of fraudulent or substandard degrees "in a written or oral advertisement or other promotion of a business; or with the intent to: obtain employment; obtain a license or certificate to practice a trade, profession, or occupation; obtain a promotion, a compensation or other benefit, or an increase in compensation or other benefit, in employment or in the practice of a trade, profession, or occupation; obtain admission to an educational program in this state; or gain a position in government with authority over another person, regardless of whether the actor receives compensation for the position." Violation of this law is a Class B misdemeanor.

Wow, great catch.  Someone should drop Texas a line on Novus Law School.  It already has Novus University on sh_t list.

 96 
 on: December 30, 2014, 05:43:22 PM 
Started by jonlevy - Last post by barprephero
The Spike TV lawsuit is PR for Spike Lee - a business expense and is plausible because he is claiming brand confusion.

Bingo

 97 
 on: December 30, 2014, 05:42:14 PM 
Started by jonlevy - Last post by barprephero
Illegal to use? I think you mean Novus is on the list of diploma mills however obviously that is not criminal or they would be prosecuted since they are not hard to find.
It varies by state. And it is what it is.
I'll post a link as an example. Don't presume, its a dangerous thing.
http://www.thecb.state.tx.us/index.cfm?objectid=EF4C3C3B-EB44-4381-6673F760B3946FBB

Institutions Whose Degrees are Illegal to Use in Texas

Consonant with its responsibilities under Chapter 61 of the Texas Education Code and rules promulgated pursuant thereto, the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board annually reviews the institutions included on this list.

"Fraudulent or substandard degree" means a degree conferred in Texas in violation of the Texas Education Code; conferred in another state in violation of that state's laws; conferred in another state by an institution that was not accredited by an accreditor recognized by the Coordinating Board and that has not been approved by the Coordinating Board for its degrees to be used in Texas; or conferred outside the United States by an institution that the Coordinating Board determines is not the equivalent of an accredited or authorized degree. (Texas Educational Code, Chapter 61, Section 61.302)

The Texas Penal Code (Section 32.52) prohibits the use of fraudulent or substandard degrees "in a written or oral advertisement or other promotion of a business; or with the intent to: obtain employment; obtain a license or certificate to practice a trade, profession, or occupation; obtain a promotion, a compensation or other benefit, or an increase in compensation or other benefit, in employment or in the practice of a trade, profession, or occupation; obtain admission to an educational program in this state; or gain a position in government with authority over another person, regardless of whether the actor receives compensation for the position." Violation of this law is a Class B misdemeanor.

 98 
 on: December 30, 2014, 05:38:09 PM 
Started by mariee414 - Last post by barprephero
It's harsh, but I almost always recommend that students retake if they think they could do better next time. The fact of the matter is that each individual point on the LSAT translates to thousands of dollars in scholarships and, eventually, salary. I think that is especially true if you have that GPA because now you're on a mission to prove that you're significantly smarter than a 2.9. Best way to illustrate that is thru the LSAT.

Best of luck,

Blueprint LSAT Prep
Retake and Cancel are not required to be done together.
I agree in part with what you said, but you could write it better to hide your obvious advertisement attempt

 99 
 on: December 30, 2014, 05:32:23 PM 
Started by jonlevy - Last post by jonlevy
The Spike TV lawsuit is PR for Spike Lee - a business expense and is plausible because he is claiming brand confusion.

 100 
 on: December 30, 2014, 04:36:36 PM 
Started by jonlevy - Last post by jonlevy
Illegal to use? I think you mean Novus is on the list of diploma mills however obviously that is not criminal or they would be prosecuted since they are not hard to find.

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