Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
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 81 
 on: August 08, 2014, 07:58:11 PM 
Started by LSAT Blog - Last post by NewlyMinted
what they are thinking when writing them and if they want to use it as a gatekeeper test or not and if they think its really relevant to law school, or if it would be better to require it be based on prelaw type questions instead.

 82 
 on: August 08, 2014, 02:10:09 PM 
Started by LSAT Blog - Last post by LSAT Blog
I'll soon be interviewing a former writer of actual LSAT questions. Given this unique opportunity, I figured that starting a thread to solicit your questions would be fitting.

What question(s) would you pose to a writer of LSAT questions? What would you want to know? Please share honest (and serious) questions.

For reference, here's a link to our previous interviews.

 83 
 on: August 07, 2014, 08:48:22 PM 
Started by mithankania - Last post by mithankania

Honestly, if you enjoy studying for the LSAT then you will probably enjoy law school if you hate studying for the LSAT you will probably not enjoy law school. With that I would recommend setting a goal to take the December LSAT that will give you months to prepare and study and will cost you about $100.00 and a Saturday afternoon.

Good luck.
Thanks so much CL and NM, I appreciate it.

That's another reason I came to this forum, as I am planning to give a shot to LSAT first and then see what would be my options and all---Definitely not trying to put my carriage in front of the horse.

Any suggestions where to start for LSAT, there's a lot of material online and can be overwhelming. I mean, any specific website or an online forum to start studying?

I have given GRE in the past for my Masters, never took GMAT though.

BTW, is LSAT an only factor in determining admission or schools look at few other things too?

P.S: What you meant by $100, is that test fee? Thought it's ~$160-$170.

 84 
 on: August 07, 2014, 08:19:40 PM 
Started by mithankania - Last post by NewlyMinted
Also, FYI with your degrees being in science fields you can take the Patent Bar without lawschool too. Some people make money doing that if that is your goal more than the actual "normal" practice of law. You'd have to call yourself "Patent Agent" instead of "Patent Lawyer" but could still sit the same exam for the same job.

If you wanted to do that job and put "JD" after you name without wanting to sit the real bar (or in theory still sit it but only in CA) consider an online one too. Example: http://www.taftu.edu

 85 
 on: August 07, 2014, 08:16:27 PM 
Started by mithankania - Last post by NewlyMinted
I agree with City, you might as well sit it. Sit the GRE and GMAT too. See what you do best at. You may be CPA in training (MBA with accounting in it helps you reach that in most states) and not even know it!  ;)

 86 
 on: August 07, 2014, 07:53:22 PM 
Started by mithankania - Last post by Citylaw
To keep it simple I think you are really well served to just take the LSAT and see how you do. Many people in your situation put their carriage in front of the horse and before committing all this thought into whether and where you should attend spend a few months studying and get an LSAT score then you can know your options.

Honestly, if you enjoy studying for the LSAT then you will probably enjoy law school if you hate studying for the LSAT you will probably not enjoy law school. With that I would recommend setting a goal to take the December LSAT that will give you months to prepare and study and will cost you about $100.00 and a Saturday afternoon.

Once you have the LSAT score you will know if you even have the option to attend law school. Once the option is there then start really considering your options and you will likely do better on the LSAT if you put less pressure on it.

Good luck.

 87 
 on: August 07, 2014, 02:39:00 PM 
Started by mithankania - Last post by mithankania
Sorry, wasn't clear.

More money and secure future/job.

 88 
 on: August 06, 2014, 10:31:29 PM 
Started by mithankania - Last post by NewlyMinted
Thanks for your help and response.

I am pretty happy in my career and making decent money(relative term).

Thinking about law school to have a secure career and at the end, more money. That's why asking you guys, before I make such a big financial and personal commitment.

Is LSAT an only factor in determining about a good school or no?Law schools only consider undergrad GPA or will take into account my Masters GPA too? How can I find out what it's really like to be a lawyer (very different from TV and movies) ?

Thanks again for helping out and sorry for too many questions.
so why consider it at all if content? Just trying to understand your point of view here.

 89 
 on: August 06, 2014, 05:51:54 PM 
Started by mithankania - Last post by mithankania
Thanks for your help and response.

I am pretty happy in my career and making decent money(relative term).

Thinking about law school to have a secure career and at the end, more money. That's why asking you guys, before I make such a big financial and personal commitment.

Is LSAT an only factor in determining about a good school or no?Law schools only consider undergrad GPA or will take into account my Masters GPA too? How can I find out what it's really like to be a lawyer (very different from TV and movies) ?

Thanks again for helping out and sorry for too many questions.


 90 
 on: August 06, 2014, 04:21:59 PM 
Started by mithankania - Last post by Maintain FL 350
Based on my background/profile, would it be a good idea to go to law school?

Well, not to sound snarky but it depends on whether or not you want to be a lawyer.

If you really want to be a lawyer, and are willing to make the necessary intellectual and financial commitment, then yes. If you are just trying to figure out what to do for the next few years and law sounds kind of interesting, then no.

Law school, the bar exam, and the job hunt are huge undertakings. You should only do it if you are sure you want to be a lawyer, an only you can answer that.

I would definitely take the time to find out what it's really like to be a lawyer (very different from TV and movies), and think about your long term goals. Law can be a great career but it's not for everyone.

I'm not sure what a 68% translates to in GPA, but if you want to go to law school start preparing for the LSAT as soon as possible. Your LSAT score is a huge factor in admissions, and a high score can help with obtaining scholarships.

Hope that helped!

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