Law School Discussion

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 81 
 on: September 29, 2014, 04:06:37 PM 
Started by flhelms - Last post by Citylaw
Excellent to hear you took it as Woody Allan said 90% of life is just showing up and whether you get a 120 or 180 you took the LSAT. I cannot tell you how many people put it off, but you can literally start applying to law schools in three weeks, and there is no harm in signign up to take the December LSAT now.

As for the application fees one way to save a lot of money on that is attending an LSAC forum or just registering. Here is a link to the LSAC page for the forums http://www.lsac.org/jd/choosing-a-law-school/forums-and-other-events .

I registered and attended one of these and got more fee waiver's than I knew what to do with. Literally go up to every school's booth you even though of applying to write down your LSAC number and most will come back with a fee waiver, and in your application you can say you stopped by the admissions officer's booth. This can give you a slight bump on your application and at the end of the day it is a numbers game, but it never hurts to talk to school's directly and save hundreds if not thousands of dollars on applications.

Again, congrats on taking the LSAT it is a big accomplishment to put yourself out there and even if you did terribly at least you put yourself out there.

When I was going through law school, LSAT, etc this quote got me through all of it.

"It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat. "

You put yourself out there and whether you failed or succeed on this small test, you put yourself out there, which is something very few people do, and it is why I love the quote so much.

Good luck in

 82 
 on: September 29, 2014, 01:02:53 PM 
Started by flhelms - Last post by flhelms
So, I took the LSAT on Saturday and I have no plans to cancel my score. LR and RC seemed to be easier than expected but LG killed me. It was exhausting but I did it. I had other reasons for this as well but I was awake for 21 hours straight right before the LSAT, during, and after. I expect my score to be 150-155. As a precursor to today's post, I am very stubborn. I don't see myself as putting off life by planning to start law school in Fall 2016 as opposed to Fall 2015. I see myself as being better prepared and taking the necessary steps to achieve my goal.

Law school has been an option in my head for a long time but I've never put serious thought into it. Earlier this year I had a dream I attended law school and I had some other things telling me law school was the answer. And when I lost my job law school was my option to start over. And you are right there is no guarantee I won't lose my job next June or I won't have some other extenuating circumstance. But I feel if I prepare better on LG alone, I will get a better score the second time I take the LSAT. As you said, my score will allow me to get in and start somewhere but I am not ready. I need to take the steps to get there. 

I visited UNC-School of Law Friday and I mentioned that my LSAT score was going to be bad. The tour guide, who was a 3L, said her score was on the lower end and that she wrote addendums. And I definitely plan on writing one for my GPA. I had a major depression one semester and against the advice I received I did not drop any classes. My aunt taught me to never quit and be strong in hard times. But because I didn't quit, my GPA suffered. I think I had a 1.8 that semester. Anyway, that was a tangent but point being I could write an addendum for a lower LSAT score as well. While on the topic of my visit to Carolina Law, I spoke with a fellow visitor about putting off law school for another year and told him I was trying to get more financially ready. He said "when will that ever happen?" And he's right to an extent. I will never be fully financially ready but I can be more ready than I am now. And the same goes for the LSAT I think I will never be fully ready but I can feel  and be more ready than I felt Saturday. Honestly, if its on the high end of my expected score range of 150-155 I may not retake it. But I will never know if I can't get in a better financial situation. I'm broke right now, I have nothing in savings. I was unexpectedly denied a fee waiver. My account is on hold right now because I registered when I thought the fee waiver would be approved and I will never be able to get my score if I don't get a job and pay the fees. I'm worried about $170 test fee because I have nothing right now.

I went on a few dates with this guy. He talked a lot about making a life plan and sticking to it. And seeing everything as a step to get to an ultimate goal. Even though that's I think part of the reason he's 39 and single, he's got a good point. I need to take the necessary steps to get to my goal of going to law school. And I cannot do them all in less than a year. And taking a year another year is one of those steps in order to complete all the little steps.  I cannot feasibly do everything I need to do to start in 2015. But starting in 2016, I can maybe not complete every little step but I can more realistic do what I need to do.

My point is I took the LSAT and I am proud of myself that I did it. I've had days when I can barely get out of bed. And I took the LSAT. And I'm proud regardless of whether I got a 120 or a 180, both of which are unlikely. I think all I can do now is get a job so I can pay the fees. Get my score and I will make a decision from there on whether to retake it. But I think regardless I am going to have to take a year to save up some money to prepare for law school. I have a lot of cost/fees with preparing for law school (test fees, CAS fee, my computer is on its last days, application fees, etc.) Plus, I got into some trouble and my credit cards are on a debt management program which I will complete in spring 2016 just keeping the payments the same so that will be alleviated by time I start school. Finances are a big concern for me right now. And I need it to be better for entering law school. I am definitely considering the cost of law school. But I know I will qualify for loans and need based grants, etc. I am stubborn, driven, and I do not give up. So, I am going to law school, I just have to be a bit realistic.

 83 
 on: September 28, 2014, 01:25:11 PM 
Started by jonlevy - Last post by jonlevy
sigh, whatever man. If my boss says "don't do this" I am not going to argue with him that he didn't really mean it or that he couldn't enforce it if he did.

1.  They didn't tell me, the recipient, not to disclose the email.

2.  There is nothing confidential in the email.

3.  It is public information.

You need to be able to distinguish between privileged and confidential material and information that is not if you want to be a lawyer.









 84 
 on: September 27, 2014, 11:29:36 PM 
Started by jonlevy - Last post by I.M.D.Law
sigh, whatever man. If my boss says "don't do this" I am not going to argue with him that he didn't really mean it or that he couldn't enforce it if he did.

 85 
 on: September 27, 2014, 06:26:06 PM 
Started by jonlevy - Last post by jonlevy
I am trying to educate you - that is not what their boilerplate says.  If you aspire to be a lawyer, you need to think like one. 


[/quote]
Do whatever you want, but if the place that gives you a license says "don't do this" I am not going to do it. I don't care if it makes any sense, bringing a passport photo to the MPRE makes ZERO sense, but they say jump so I jump.
[/quote]

 86 
 on: September 27, 2014, 06:05:56 PM 
Started by I.M.D.Law - Last post by I.M.D.Law
http://nypost.com/2014/09/18/judge-oks-serving-legal-papers-via-facebook/

This actually makes a lot of sense to me (as long as they can prove it is an active account) The only people that I can see complaining about this are deadbeats who also cry when the server "lies" to them by "tricking" them into admitting who they are (dressing as pizzaman,etc)

 87 
 on: September 27, 2014, 11:55:06 AM 
Started by flhelms - Last post by I.M.D.Law
Dang, City provided one of the most quality posts I've seen on these threads in years (most of the other law school threads are just populated by homophobic racist comments for some reason anymore) I'd toss on top of his comments the fact that if you lost your job that student loans will cover living expenses since most law schools don't have on campus  housing and food plans for their grad the way they do for undergrad (some do though, and if you want that, factor that in while picking) It also tends not to counts as "income" against unemployment benefits.

I knew a few people who went to grad school just because they were laid off from their job. It worked out ok for them, and while I wouldn't make it the only reason to do it, it's ok to let that be a factor too.

Some schools have decent MSL degrees that let you take classes side by side with law students but be done in a year if you want to "Test the waters" and get a legal degree without going full JD. The only down side to that is that they tend not to transfer for credit into the JD, so if you did like it, you'd have to do a lot of those same classes again later in the JD. Then again that would increase the odds that you could get a 4.0 and honors when you did them again since you'd already know what to do. Kind of a crazy idea, but I figured it was worth tossing out there too.

 88 
 on: September 27, 2014, 11:35:57 AM 
Started by flhelms - Last post by Citylaw
As Freshlyminted said ramble on, but after reading your post I think there are several things to consider.

One thing is that a lot of curveballs can be thrown your way. It sounds like you lost your job, and are a little confused right now, but what is to say you will not lose another job in 2015, or obtain a job that requires you to put in 80 hours a week by June 2015, or your best friend will get married on the same ay day as the June LSAT etc.  The longer you put these tests off the less likely you are to actually take the test. Plenty of people put it off, and eventually take it, but most don't.

In June 2015, I guarantee you will feel unprepared as well. There is always more you can do or think you should do. Once your in law school however, when finals come around you will say "oh sh*t" I should have done X, Y, Z, but the final will happen. Same is true with the Bar so on and so on.

Additionally, the fact that the LSAT costs $100-200 bucks really should not be a huge concern. If you go to law school your making a $100,000+ commitment, if $100-$200 is causing you stress, then really think about the reality of the expense of law school.

Finally, again 160-165 is a pretty solid score, and I hope you get hell I hope you get a 180, but scoring a 160 puts you in the top 20% of LSAT test takers, and people that take the LSAT are smart are college graduates, motivated enough to attend law school, and possess the fortitude to actually take the LSAT. There is 80% chance you will not score in the top 20%. 

This reality is something you also need to consider if you go to law school. At any ABA law school even ones that accept 3.0 and 145 GPA's as you refer to them as contain smart, hard-working, and motivated individuals that all think they are special and are certain they will finish in the top 10% of the class. However, 90% of these students end up disappointed.

Again, I really urge you to take the LSAT this Saturday, and if you feel like you terrible cancel the score. However, odds are you will probably score in the 150-155 range, and you can start applying for law school Fall 2015 instead of Fall 2016, which will give you one more year to work as an attorney and start your career. Additionally, almost every school simply takes your highest score so even if you score a 120 every question wrong, which is unlikely you can retake in 2015 and they will take the highest score.

Conclusion:
The biggest thing standing in most people's way is themselves. I can see you are putting a lot of thought, and stress into this, but it is really not that complicated. All you need to do is take the test this Saturday. If you absolutely hate the experience you are out $100-$200 and a Saturday afternoon. Odds are however, you will get a decent score and be able to start applying to law schools right now.

Or you can wait around for your another year and in June 2015 you will have this same feeling, and then either take the test or put it off for more time.

I am just a random internet poster so take my advice with a grain of salt, but one of the most important things you learn in law school is how to not over complicate things.  In your first year of law school I guarantee you all your textbooks will be highlighted to no end you will read case after case and be freaking out, but by the time third year rolls around you will skim a case and know the important things to look for, and think to yourself what an idiot you were 1L spending so much time on something that really was not that hard.

Once you take the LSAT whether it be this Saturday or next year, I am sure you will feel great once it is done. However, if putting it off the stress and frustration can be overwhelming, and there is no worse feeling than knowing you didn't try for something you wanted.

Good luck whatever you decide.

 89 
 on: September 26, 2014, 11:49:21 PM 
Started by jonlevy - Last post by I.M.D.Law
Again, I refer you to my previous post
it pains me how simple this is

Sorry what is your point?  Am I supposed to be afraid of the California Bar Admissions Committee for asking them on the record about Novus?   I think they are a great agency, they literally answered me the same day.  I can't say the same for the CIA; they forced me to sue them to get records.
Do whatever you want, but if the place that gives you a license says "don't do this" I am not going to do it. I don't care if it makes any sense, bringing a passport photo to the MPRE makes ZERO sense, but they say jump so I jump.

 90 
 on: September 26, 2014, 11:44:25 PM 
Started by jonlevy - Last post by jonlevy
Again, I refer you to my previous post
it pains me how simple this is

Sorry what is your point?  Am I supposed to be afraid of the California Bar Admissions Committee for asking them on the record about Novus?   I think they are a great agency, they literally answered me the same day.  I can't say the same for the CIA; they forced me to sue them to get records.




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