Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
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 81 
 on: August 16, 2014, 07:06:23 AM 
Started by Niques - Last post by Groundhog
Online, I imagine, mostly; other non-ABA schools.

 82 
 on: August 16, 2014, 07:05:36 AM 
Started by livekhaos - Last post by Groundhog
I think the toughest part is not just your GPA but your lack of courses for credit. Whether unfair or not, the credit by exam does not reflect academic learning and there can be a certain lack of rigor associated with credit/no credit courses.

As others have said, you are a splitter, but this is complicated by the fact that so few courses for credit doesn't really tell much of a story in terms of academic history.

Provided you meet the requirements, you will likely be admitted to an ABA program with that LSAT score, but I'd definitely focus on discussing your businesses in your application. From an admissions perspective, other than your LSAT, that is the strongest component of your application. As you noted, you are a little older than some, so this would fit in well with that profile.

Good luck!

 83 
 on: August 15, 2014, 06:00:36 PM 
Started by livekhaos - Last post by livekhaos
I'm familiar with those schools, they're among the oldest and best established distance learning programs.
If you plan to remain in NY/NJ you could look at CUNY, NYLS, Touro, St. John's, maybe Seton Hall and Rutgers. As a splitter, you might want to apply to lots of schools and just see what happens. Like I said before, it's harder to predict.

Good Luck!

Thank you Maintain. I appreciate all of your words.

 84 
 on: August 15, 2014, 12:54:03 PM 
Started by LSAT Blog - Last post by LSAT Blog
Wow - a lot of questions there!

What do you mean by "prelaw type questions?"

 85 
 on: August 15, 2014, 12:24:13 PM 
Started by livekhaos - Last post by Maintain FL 350
I'm familiar with those schools, they're among the oldest and best established distance learning programs.
If you plan to remain in NY/NJ you could look at CUNY, NYLS, Touro, St. John's, maybe Seton Hall and Rutgers. As a splitter, you might want to apply to lots of schools and just see what happens. Like I said before, it's harder to predict.

Good Luck!

 86 
 on: August 15, 2014, 10:25:14 AM 
Started by livekhaos - Last post by livekhaos
@Maintain

Thank you for your response. No offense taken. I actually attend Excelsior College in New York. It's a Regionally Accred school that let's you test out of most of your degree requirements. Very similar to Thomas Edison State College in NJ and Charter Oak State College in CT. These schools are called the "Big 3". They all offer solid online programs.

I'd like to think that I have a great deal of self-discipline when I want/need to as a majority of my degree is from self-taught coursework.

 87 
 on: August 14, 2014, 10:31:12 PM 
Started by livekhaos - Last post by Maintain FL 350
You're a splitter, and that makes it more difficult to predict where you will or won't get into. That said, there are definitely law schools that will accept someone with your numbers based on your LSAT score.

You should narrow it down to a geographic region, specifically the state/city you plan to practice in. If you can score a scholarship, great, although it will be difficult with a 2.12 GPA (except at a few places like Cooley as Newly Minted mentioned).

I've only completed 6 classes that I received a letter grade for, this is the only reason I have a low GPA (which maybe I can explain in my PS). The rest of my classes are ALL pass/fail.


Just curious, was your undergrad at a traditional four year university? It's just that I've never heard of a program where almost all of the classes are pass/fail. That's very unusual.

You can definitely explain it in your PS, but it probably won't make much difference. Your GPA is what it is, and it's very low for the purposes of law school admission. Your best bet is to apply to schools for which your LSAT score is above average.

One last thing (and don't take this the wrong way): make sure that whatever obstacles resulted in a low undergrad GPA are resolved before you begin law school. Law makes undergrad look like a joke. It's very, very demanding and you won't get a passing grade just by showing up.

Your LSAT score indicates that you have the brains to succeed, but law school requires a huge investment of time and self-discipline. Something to think about before you write a check for $100K.


 88 
 on: August 14, 2014, 08:58:04 PM 
Started by livekhaos - Last post by livekhaos
Your GPA is why I tell freshman who want to go to lawschool to NOT take hard classes like psych but blow off liberal arts junk to keep a 4.0
That GPA is still a FULL SCHOLARSHIP at places like Cooley, but likely the GPA would keep you out of anything beyond state law schools.

Thank you NM. The F's weren't in any Psych related class, I actually perform very well in these classes. They were in Anatomy & Physio W/Lab...had to drop out due to multiple deaths in Family.

 89 
 on: August 14, 2014, 07:54:20 PM 
Started by livekhaos - Last post by @_@
Your GPA is why I tell freshman who want to go to lawschool to NOT take hard classes like psych but blow off liberal arts junk to keep a 4.0
That GPA is still a FULL SCHOLARSHIP at places like Cooley, but likely the GPA would keep you out of anything beyond state law schools.

 90 
 on: August 14, 2014, 07:52:52 PM 
Started by Niques - Last post by @_@
130 range LSAT?  :o
Which school accepts those scores?

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