Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
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 71 
 on: August 09, 2014, 01:05:39 PM 
Started by lyny - Last post by Maintain FL 350
I agree with Citylaw, I don't think it's a big deal unless you fail to disclose it. Your applications to law school and the bar will ask about disciplinary actions and it's important to fully disclose everything.

I don't think this will have any impact on law school admissions, but the bar may require a more detailed explanation. They will probably require you to submit all paperwork associated with the action, so make sure you are 100% honest in your explanation. In law school you will learn that the bar is pretty forgiving, but they take even a hint of dishonesty very seriously. 

 72 
 on: August 09, 2014, 12:15:29 AM 
Started by lyny - Last post by Citylaw
Probably not that big of deal. Stupid yes, but plenty of lawyers got DUI's or arrested etc.

Don't do it again and you will have to disclose the incident in applications and to the bar when you apply, but as long as you don't try to hide it you should be fine. Plenty of my law school classmates who are now practicing lawyers did a lot worse things and our licensed, but use better judgment moving forward.

Really the only way this is likely to hurt you is if when asked you fail to disclose.

Sorry to hear about the incident and hopefully you learned from your mistake.


 73 
 on: August 08, 2014, 08:18:04 PM 
Started by lyny - Last post by lyny
I'm an undergrad junior.  Today, I was put on probation by my university for playing a prank on a friend involving a fake arrest warrant. Dumb prank, I know, I know. I am mortified at how stupid this was, but it was funny at the time. The friend freaked out and tried to turn himself in, and now I'm here.

How bad is this for me as far as law school admissions & the bar?  I'm sure it's not good, but how bad is it?

 74 
 on: August 08, 2014, 07:58:11 PM 
Started by LSAT Blog - Last post by NewlyMinted
what they are thinking when writing them and if they want to use it as a gatekeeper test or not and if they think its really relevant to law school, or if it would be better to require it be based on prelaw type questions instead.

 75 
 on: August 08, 2014, 02:10:09 PM 
Started by LSAT Blog - Last post by LSAT Blog
I'll soon be interviewing a former writer of actual LSAT questions. Given this unique opportunity, I figured that starting a thread to solicit your questions would be fitting.

What question(s) would you pose to a writer of LSAT questions? What would you want to know? Please share honest (and serious) questions.

For reference, here's a link to our previous interviews.

 76 
 on: August 07, 2014, 08:48:22 PM 
Started by mithankania - Last post by mithankania

Honestly, if you enjoy studying for the LSAT then you will probably enjoy law school if you hate studying for the LSAT you will probably not enjoy law school. With that I would recommend setting a goal to take the December LSAT that will give you months to prepare and study and will cost you about $100.00 and a Saturday afternoon.

Good luck.
Thanks so much CL and NM, I appreciate it.

That's another reason I came to this forum, as I am planning to give a shot to LSAT first and then see what would be my options and all---Definitely not trying to put my carriage in front of the horse.

Any suggestions where to start for LSAT, there's a lot of material online and can be overwhelming. I mean, any specific website or an online forum to start studying?

I have given GRE in the past for my Masters, never took GMAT though.

BTW, is LSAT an only factor in determining admission or schools look at few other things too?

P.S: What you meant by $100, is that test fee? Thought it's ~$160-$170.

 77 
 on: August 07, 2014, 08:19:40 PM 
Started by mithankania - Last post by NewlyMinted
Also, FYI with your degrees being in science fields you can take the Patent Bar without lawschool too. Some people make money doing that if that is your goal more than the actual "normal" practice of law. You'd have to call yourself "Patent Agent" instead of "Patent Lawyer" but could still sit the same exam for the same job.

If you wanted to do that job and put "JD" after you name without wanting to sit the real bar (or in theory still sit it but only in CA) consider an online one too. Example: http://www.taftu.edu

 78 
 on: August 07, 2014, 08:16:27 PM 
Started by mithankania - Last post by NewlyMinted
I agree with City, you might as well sit it. Sit the GRE and GMAT too. See what you do best at. You may be CPA in training (MBA with accounting in it helps you reach that in most states) and not even know it!  ;)

 79 
 on: August 07, 2014, 07:53:22 PM 
Started by mithankania - Last post by Citylaw
To keep it simple I think you are really well served to just take the LSAT and see how you do. Many people in your situation put their carriage in front of the horse and before committing all this thought into whether and where you should attend spend a few months studying and get an LSAT score then you can know your options.

Honestly, if you enjoy studying for the LSAT then you will probably enjoy law school if you hate studying for the LSAT you will probably not enjoy law school. With that I would recommend setting a goal to take the December LSAT that will give you months to prepare and study and will cost you about $100.00 and a Saturday afternoon.

Once you have the LSAT score you will know if you even have the option to attend law school. Once the option is there then start really considering your options and you will likely do better on the LSAT if you put less pressure on it.

Good luck.

 80 
 on: August 07, 2014, 02:39:00 PM 
Started by mithankania - Last post by mithankania
Sorry, wasn't clear.

More money and secure future/job.

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