Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
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 61 
 on: October 02, 2014, 02:58:24 PM 
Started by jonlevy - Last post by Groundhog
Hmm, what action would you recommend the state bars take? The State Bar of California is not an accreditation or business licensing agency so they can't order a business to shut down. All they can do is "inform you that Novus Law School does not have degree-granting authority from any recognized U.S. educational entity," as you noted in the other thread (http://www.lawschooldiscussion.org/index.php?topic=4028640.0).

 62 
 on: October 02, 2014, 02:23:15 PM 
Started by jonlevy - Last post by jonlevy

Clearly, this demonstrates the ABA needs to approve more schools!

LOL. Tells me the state bars are not doing their jobs.  According to the lawsuit, Novus operates in California.

 63 
 on: October 02, 2014, 02:12:15 PM 
Started by jonlevy - Last post by Groundhog
The complaint said a Novus grad launched a frivolous lawsuit against Touro, when Touro would not honor their bogus degree.  So Touro had to pay legal fees because Novus was falsely telling grads they had a "foreign law degree" and all they had to do is enroll for a LLM to qualify for the bar.

Clearly, this demonstrates the ABA needs to approve more schools!

 64 
 on: October 02, 2014, 01:30:42 PM 
Started by jonlevy - Last post by jonlevy
The complaint said a Novus grad launched a frivolous lawsuit against Touro, when Touro would not honor their bogus degree.  So Touro had to pay legal fees because Novus was falsely telling grads they had a "foreign law degree" and all they had to do is enroll for a LLM to qualify for the bar.

 65 
 on: October 02, 2014, 01:07:21 PM 
Started by IlLogicalKurt - Last post by Maintain FL 350
There are many threads here which discuss the impact of "soft factors" such as graduate degrees, the OP may want to read them.

It boils down to this:

A graduate degree is not useless in terms of law school admission, but it's not very helpful either.

A graduate degree may give the applicant a small boost, especially if it is in a hard science and/or from an elite university. Thus, an M.S. in Biochem from Caltech may help but an M.A. in English from Unknown State U will not.

Graduate studies are very different from law school, and one is not preparation for the other. The fact that someone completes an M.A. does not mean they are more likely to do well in Property than someone who hasn't.

LSAT and GPA however, do tend to be reliable indicators of law school aptitude.

In the scenario that the OP has described, both applicants are so close numerically that they would have very similar chances of admission. In that case, an M.A. might help. The majority of admission decisions are, as Groundhog stated, going to be made pretty quickly based on numbers. If the M.A. holder is a few LSAT points below the non-M.A. applicant, that soft factor is not going to overcome the lower LSAT score.

I understand this is frustrating, but when you get to law school you will see that your M.A. is of little use in terms of studying the law. That's just the way it is. 

 66 
 on: October 02, 2014, 12:45:35 PM 
Started by jonlevy - Last post by Maintain FL 350
Just curious, how did Touro establish standing? Because former Novus students applied to Touro? I can see how the former students would meet the requirements for class certification, but not Touro.

Either way, good fr them. I hope they win and that the state bars crack down on this nonsense.   

 67 
 on: October 02, 2014, 10:38:56 AM 
Started by jonlevy - Last post by jonlevy
It is a class action seeking a declaratory ruling that Novus degrees are worthless. Touro alleges Novus is deceiving both students and other law programs by claiming it is a "law school."  Graduates of Novus tried to get admitted to Touro and then apparently tried to force their admission as graduates of a foreign law school. I think the lawsuit has merit because practice of law and law schools are a regulated category.  Here you have what appears to be non attorneys instructing by email and multiple choice.

Touro is doing everyone a great service; on the other hand the state bars, in particular California where Novus seems to be based, seems to be remiss in its duties to protect the public and legitimate online law schools from an alleged scam.

 68 
 on: October 02, 2014, 09:44:35 AM 
Started by passaroa25 - Last post by DeltaBravoKS
Yes, that was a reply to a previous poster's comment comparing a hot dog to Mid-Atlantic.  For some reason, it doesn't always quote the post I'm replying to...

 69 
 on: October 02, 2014, 02:11:46 AM 
Started by IlLogicalKurt - Last post by Groundhog
Out of curiosity to OP, why the Master's in Peace and Conflict Management Studies? What jobs does this prepare you for without a law degree? What attorney positions, international or domestic, does this help you get?

Very few attorneys practice international law. Most of that would be handled by Ambassadors and political appointees as matters of foreign policy or the military. Are you interested in a position in the State department? Would you rather be an attorney or the kinds of jobs that graduates of the Master's degree you seek receive, perhaps a Foreign Service Officer?

While I realize this may assume a lot, your original post comes off as you wanting to be convinced that a Master's degree can help with law school admissions or make up for GPA points, but neither is particularly the case. If that is the reason why you are getting a Master's degree, STOP. If you want to be an attorney, practicing real law, then I would also say STOP. The Master's degree isn't worth the time and money. If you want to join the foreign service or something that is more on the foreign policy side, I would consider alternatives to law school.

 70 
 on: October 01, 2014, 11:08:02 PM 
Started by passaroa25 - Last post by I.M.D.Law
Except, at least you can get a hot dog from a hot dog vendor!
I smell a joke, but I don't get it

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