Law School Discussion

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61

Not true, MANY have majors as options, and without question concentrations on the rest, and different quality of clinics for options (if any at all in those specific areas)

Muahahahaha!

Many law schools have "majors" as options? Really?

So, when I'm on the hiring committee, and someone tells me that they received a JD with a major in corporate law* ... do you think I'm going to laugh, or just toss the applicant's file?

So, moving on from that foolishness (you get a Doctorate in Jurisprudence, not a Bachelor of Science/Arts with a major), let's address your other incorrect points.

Do schools offer concentrations / certificates / gold stars? Of course they do! After all, they need things to put in brochures for impressionable 0Ls. You know, the kind that think, "I wanna be an international lawyer!" Allow me to rank the value of these concentrations / certificates / gold stars in the real world (assuming you haven't been practicing for a while, in which case, who cares what you did in school?)-
1. Class Rank/School.
2. Law review/ Moot court.
3. Trial Team
4. Jobs / Positions taken during 1L and 2L summers
5. RA to Professor, other academic work.
6. Secondary journal.
7. Cool facts about the person, like their middle name.
....
38. Concentration.

I kid, but only slightly. Because these "certificates" and "concentrations" have no more validity than what the school says they have. They are just another thing to on your resume - nothing more, nothing less. And they are almost all a big joke.

Do some schools have better clinics? Sure. Can I think of a school that doesn't offer clinics in criminal law? No. Is this something that someone will easily find out, as opposed to every single school saying they offer "amazing clinics, with hand-on ability to work with actual clients and practitioners!" Nope. Isn't it true that only a small percentage of the student body will usually take advantage of the amazing opportunities, while the vast majority won't- yep (and can you blame some of them- if you're going into transaction work, why the heck do you need a litigation clinic)?

Finally, let's look at the request. Even assuming you weren't wrong (which is difficult, but we're analyzing a hypothetical here), the specific question was directed toward criminal law and child advocacy law. Now, I respect people that can practice in those fields. And while "child advocacy law" is somewhat ill-defined for purposes of the question, family law and criminal law as fields are the two easiest areas to break into, if that's what someone would like to do. I'm not saying that all areas of each are equally easy to get into- the difference between federal prosecution and state public defense is ... not small.

Anyway, to sum up- please don't believe the crud law schools are shoveling at you.



*Except someone with that lack of knowledge wouldn't say corporate law, they'd say M&A, because of course they would.
62
I agree, when in doubt OVER disclose. There may be no record to worry about, but ASSUME there is. OVER disclose!!!
63
Hello I need help! I want to go into either child advocacy law or criminal law and I want to know if anyone knows of any good schools with great programs for either of these majors? :o

1. There are no "majors" in law school. Just a JD.

2. Any school will teach you enough to go into child advocacy law or criminal law.

3. Do not believe the self-rankings of schools regarding their programs; with a very few exceptions (such as tax law, which you need an LLM for anyway) it doesn't matter at all. Certainly not for those areas.

4. Go to the school the you like, that is the least expensive, in the geographic area that you believe you will practice.

Finally, good luck. Those are two fields that I could never practice in. It's not the law - it's the facts, if you know what I mean.

Not true, MANY have majors as options, and without question concentrations on the rest, and different quality of clinics for options (if any at all in those specific areas)
64
Hello I need help! I want to go into either child advocacy law or criminal law and I want to know if anyone knows of any good schools with great programs for either of these majors? :o

1. There are no "majors" in law school. Just a JD.

2. Any school will teach you enough to go into child advocacy law or criminal law.

3. Do not believe the self-rankings of schools regarding their programs; with a very few exceptions (such as tax law, which you need an LLM for anyway) it doesn't matter at all. Certainly not for those areas.

4. Go to the school the you like, that is the least expensive, in the geographic area that you believe you will practice.

Finally, good luck. Those are two fields that I could never practice in. It's not the law - it's the facts, if you know what I mean.
65
Hello I need help! I want to go into either child advocacy law or criminal law and I want to know if anyone knows of any good schools with great programs for either of these majors? :o
66
Someone called 911 and the university gave you "disciplinary probation" just because you made some noise?

In any case, as Loki stated both law schools and the bar will require you to report any such disciplinary actions. I doubt that this alone would keep you out of law school. The bar will require a more in depth answer, and will probably want the police report and university report, etc. It is important that you be 100% honest. They will forgive many things, but not lying.
67
Not enough information in this post.

As a usual rule, you have to disclose crimes and academic discipline. You will likely have to disclose this event to the law schools you apply to, and to any Bar that you take. You will need to be more candid than, "Put a little crudely, we got very loud[.]" Were you having loud consensual intercourse? Were you having a loud argument?

Assuming there are no other issues, so long as you are candid, this shouldn't be a bar for admission to a school, or admission to a bar.
68
Hi! I'm an international student studying in the U.S. I recently received a disciplinary probation for causing a disturbance which required police attention. that was my charge. What basically happened that day was my girlfriend and I were in  my room. Put a little crudely, we got very loud and the RA who outside my room at that time,  dialled 911 thinking my girlfriend was getting assaulted. The police came and questioned both of us and left. My girlfriend and i thought that was it because the police report that followed said there was no evidence of sexual or relational violence and this is also stated in the university report. However, the university gave me disciplinary probation on the charges mentioned above. My question is : will this prevent me from getting into a top law school? I basically feel like my entire future is ruined because of this and no matter how many times my girlfriend and I explain to them, they refuse to accept this as a misunderstanding. Will this seriously affect my chances in law school admissions?
Depends........are you a registered sexoffender due to this "misunderstanding" ?
69
Online Law Schools / Re: Anybody thinking about Taft?
« Last post by Kobayashi Maru on August 15, 2016, 04:33:21 PM »
Respectfully I have to disagree.  If the OP does not want to be an attorney but be learned in the law, a regionally accredited Masters in Legal Studies is the ticket. The material taught is different from law school in some respects. A fully accredited Masters degree will be useful either in further academic studies or jobwise whereas an unaccredited online law degree is pretty much useless except as a bar ticket. 

Secondly and perhaps more importantly, we have forgotten that a California online program requires the student to pass the First Year Bar Exam and travel to California before they can continue their studies.  That is one nasty exam and has about a 20% pass rate, so why subject yourself to that?
I had mentioned a few things, so I assume you are disagreeing with the EJD part (not the other law doctorates -which are MORE respected than the Masters, since......its the same thing........but higher up.....)

As to the bar requirements, those do not exist for EJD

I am just saying that someone interested in law who does not want to be lawyer should consider a Masters In Legal Studies.
No one wants to brings a Masters Degree to a Doctorate fight

http://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=leave+it+to+a+wop+to+brought+a+knife+to+a+gun+fight&view=detail&mid=AE4DCC8AF973563C35A5AE4DCC8AF973563C35A5&FORM=VIRE

(insert word changes appropriately)
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I tend to agree, those who the nanny state is trying to protect are too stupid and arrogant to understand the odds of ever becoming a lawyer though distance learning.  I calculated the odds as 20-1 against when I undertook distance learning and knew that if I made it past the First Year Bar exam - the odds improve to 5-1 against.

People misuse words like "nannystate". Based on that math telling stores NOT to use lead paint in your cupcake frosting is "nannystate"

Anyone who spent even 30 minutes researching online law schools would stumble upon California State Bar pass statistics which tell most of the story.  If you want to pass the bar, an online school is the worst alternative. It really works only for those unable to attend a ABA or California bar approved law school.  Distance education on the other hands can work just fine in legal systems that do not require a bar exam as in England.
Again.........you mistake "us" for "they"........They are not.

PROTECT OUR RETARDS AMERICA!!!!!!!!!!
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