Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
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 21 
 on: September 18, 2014, 11:00:21 AM 
Started by almighty - Last post by Citylaw
Join the club of law school applicants that partied to much and didn't take undergrad to seriously. You did not list your GPA so I don't know what your GPA was, but I imagine like 95% of undergrad students you don't have a 4.0.

If you have a 3.0 or above you can get into a number of law schools.

Your post seems to indicate you will only accept a T14 school, but I don't know how many incoming law students erroneously think this matters or is commonplace. If you can get into Harvard go for it, but 99% of practicing lawyers did not go to Harvard or Yale. Additionally, going to Harvard or Yale does not mean you will succeed in teh legal profession. One of my really good friends went to Yale Law School, but he hated being a lawyer and is now a salesman. He completely regrets having ever gone to law school, because it wasn't for him. Many of law school classmates are obviously doing quite well, but the point is going to X school does not mean success.

If you get a 170 on the LSAT awesome more power to you, but again there is 95% chance you will not score a 170 on the LSAT nothing against you, but odds are you not going to score in the top 5% of test takers.

Conclusion:
Take the LSAT see what you get and assess your options. Don't go to the PeaceCorps or any of the other numerous things for the purpose of getting into a "better" law school. Just take the LSAT and see where you stand and decide whether to attend law school or not.

Also remember that the T14 schools are based on U.S. News, which is nothing more than a for-profit unregulated magazine offering an opinion and the "T14" schools changed every year. There are certain schools Harvard, Yale, Stanford, that people know across the country, but Notre Dame is a great school in the Midwest, Texas is the best school for Texas, Nebraska is best for Nebraska, on and on location matters far more than what U.S. News says.

Here is an excellent article explaining the things to consider when choosing a law school. http://www.legalmatch.com/choose-the-right-law-school.html

Good luck in your pursuit of a legal education.

 22 
 on: September 17, 2014, 09:10:19 PM 
Started by Rafiki88 - Last post by Rafiki88
Hi:

I was charged with a misdemeanor class 2 (criminal mischief) in the US almost 7 years ago (when I was 20 years old). Im planning on applying to several law schools, some of them among the top ranks (NYU, Columbia, Harvard, etc.). In the application forms all universities request disclosure on past criminal records.

Do you believe that having this charge will seriously affect my chances of getting in? I have very good academic records and my LORs are expected to be good as well.

Thank you in advance,

 23 
 on: September 17, 2014, 09:05:32 PM 
Started by Rafiki88 - Last post by Rafiki88
Hi:

I was charged with a misdemeanor class 2 (criminal mischief) in the US almost 7 years ago (when I was 20 years old). Im planning on applying to several law schools, some of them among the top ranks (NYU, Columbia, Harvard, etc.). In the application forms all universities request disclosure on past criminal records.

Do you believe that having this charge will seriously affect my chances of getting in? I have very good academic records and my LORs are expected to be good as well.

Thank you in advance,

 

 24 
 on: September 17, 2014, 07:05:19 PM 
Started by passaroa25 - Last post by DeltaBravoKS
So, I guess he was not only the director, but the web master and mail reader...

 25 
 on: September 17, 2014, 06:35:11 PM 
Started by almighty - Last post by Maintain FL 350
There's a lot to address here, but I'll try to keep it short.

Extracurricular "soft factors"

Do they matter? Yes, but not nearly as much as your numbers. These kinds of factors are taken into account in addition to, not in lieu of, a good GPA/LSAT.

I don't know what your GPA actually is, but at T14-T20 (and many schools ranked lower than that) you will need a high GPA and high LSAT, period. Those schools have so many well qualified applicants with high numbers and impressive soft factors that there isn't much incentive to take someone who is lacking in any area.

Lots of applicants, especially at top schools, have impressive soft factors. Pretty much everyone who applies to non-T14 schools, too, does some volunteer work or gets a little experience at a law office, or gets a letter of recommendation from some lawyer. The admissions offices are very used to this. Unless you have truly unique and outstanding experience it will not matter too much, and certainly won't overcome a lack of numeric qualifications.

I'm not saying this to be rude, but depending on how low your GPA is the T14 might be a pipe dream regardless of soft factors or LSAT score.

URM status can be a significant factor, but I'm not sure if Palestinians receive much of a boost. It may help a little, though.

Lastly, until you get a real LSAT score everything is pure speculation. I would advise preparing for the LSAT as much as possible. Do the extracurricular stuff too, but really focus on the LSAT. And remember, the T14 are not the only law schools out there. If you get in, great. If not, think about your goals and see if another school can help you achieve them. 

   

 26 
 on: September 17, 2014, 05:08:18 PM 
Started by BP Robert - Last post by BP Robert
Hey LSDers!

Exciting news from Blueprint HQ: we just released the results of our score study, which we conduct every three years, and Blueprint students averaged an 11-point increase from their first practice test to their best practice test.
In celebration of the 11-point increase, we’re offering an 11% discount on Blueprint fall courses (both online and classroom) from now until October 5th. Simply sign up online with the discount code ‘BP11’ or give us a call to register.

Some more details:
- 88% of students increased their score by 5 or more points.
- 59% of students increased their score by 10 or more points.
- 26% of students increased their score by 15 or more points.
- 52% of students scored 160 or higher.
- 34% of students scored 165 or higher.
- 16% of students scored 170 or higher.

The score increase study was conducted in the spring of 2014, and included all qualifying students in Blueprint classroom courses across the country. To qualify for the study, students had to take all four proctored practice tests given in the course. The study excluded self-study students who did not attend a live class. Repeat students were also excluded. The score increase was calculated from students’ first practice exam to their best score. Using the first to last practice exam convention, the average score increase was nine (9) points. The score increase data was calculated by the accounting firm of BPE&H using test results taken directly from the Blueprint database.

You can check out more details at http://blueprintlsat.com/lsat/score-increases/.

 27 
 on: September 17, 2014, 05:06:11 PM 
Started by yingjiangjp - Last post by BP Robert
Hi Ming,

I'd suggest that you get in contact with the pre-law organizations at a couple near by colleges.
Also, there's a site called toplawschool.com that has a little more traffic and may be hiding your future study buddy.

Best luck,

Robert

 28 
 on: September 17, 2014, 04:19:45 PM 
Started by passaroa25 - Last post by vanceap3
I have tried to contact this school a few times and have received no answer.  Is this a typical response from MASL?
The Director of MASL, Dr. Baxter Paschal, has passed away.  The web page for MASL has been taken down and emails are returned to sender.

 29 
 on: September 16, 2014, 11:57:56 PM 
Started by teachflife - Last post by Julie Fern
where funny part?

 30 
 on: September 16, 2014, 10:47:55 PM 
Started by almighty - Last post by almighty
This is going to be a long winded, rant like post of my jotting my ideas down as they come to mind, but I need some help. I know better than to bore you with a story about how I screwed up and seek refuge from law admissions. I won't go into great detail, but I didn't try very hard in school and partied too much. I graduated with a bachelor's degree in psychology and am born to two immigrant parents (Palestinian). I was always interested in law and becoming a lawyer, but unfortunately I was more interested in partying into my undergrad. Since graduating in December, I've been thirsty for knowledge and experience and I believe I have matured a lot in the realm of academics and motivation.

I learned from people on other forums that law school is almost entirely a numbers game consisting of GPA and LSAT score. It seems almost everyone online doesn't believe in the strength of extracurriculars or experiences helping at all on an application compared to the former two requirements, but I am still curious. I don't really have any solid work experience or references due to me having to run my family business for personal reasons after I graduated. I am trying to find volunteer or career work and am looking into joining AmeriCorps NCCC and using that time to get some experience, references and study for the LSAT while I'm there when I can. Essentially, I'm looking for some gainful volunteer work that will strengthen me as an applicant (mainly because I can't find a job that would show the same kind of commitment and I'm not necessarily pressed for money right now).

Things I am considering:
Joining AmeriCorps NCCC
CASA (court appointed special advocate)
Volunteer at a district or municipal court (this is surprisingly hard to find)
Work in a law office

I understand and accept that admission is mainly a numbers game, but for someone like me who doesn't have the grades and absolutely no outstanding experience or references, I truly believe that extracurriculars will show my maturity and law admissions have no choice but to acknowledge those. When I return or stop doing volunteer work, I will be hopefully finding part time employment in the legal field and then taking a LSAT prep course, taking a few classes to show a current GPA capability.

I guess I just want some suggestions on ways I could strengthen my application, especially because literally all I have is a poor GPA and hopefully an LSAT score above 170. Am I doing this wrong? What should I do to ensure getting into a T-14 school? T-20? And are my ideas above a good idea?

Also, should I study on my own for the LSAT, take the LSAT, and then depending on my score, take a prep class then take it again? Again, I'm willing to do whatever it takes to have a shot at T-14. I want to take the most effective steps.

THANKS!


ALSO: I want to make PERFECTLY CLEAR that I know that absolutely rocking the LSAT is the single most deciding factor on if and where I go to school. But I am looking to see if there is anything else I can do, whether it is the volunteer options above, going back to school or anything else that will also help make a difference.

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