Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
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 11 
 on: Yesterday at 05:47:30 PM 
Started by Tonyworks4u - Last post by lawguy
Your story involves a Professor who said he attended a University and earned a Doctorate, but he never attended the University or earned a doctorate. He went on to create a forged diploma. That is obviously a crime.

However, attending Novus Law School and saying you attended Novus Law School is a not a crime.

I was actually very interested in learning about Novus Grads being prosecuted for telling the truth on their resume, but it was a pointless exaggeration. The internet is well known for pointless exaggerations and it is probably good for boards like this. 

Seriously, if you do hear of Novus Grads going to jail for saying they attended a school they actually attended please share on this thread.
holy...........*&^%.................you know there were other parties posting here too right? You read their stuff right? You realize (again, I spoon feed it to you AGAIN) that I responding to MULTIPLE topics right?????
-And AGAIN I listed how it CAN get you arrested using Novus (full link and everything)

I give up man. Enjoy life.

 12 
 on: Yesterday at 05:03:06 PM 
Started by Tonyworks4u - Last post by Citylaw
Interesting analysis and again who knows.  I find it unlikely a prosecutor would take that case in the first place, but in the event a prosecutor did take the case, I believe there are several defenses. First and foremost it is restricting Freedom of Speech and Association., why can't you say you attended a school that you attended and why would you be prosecuted for associating with an institution.

I also think it would violate privileges and immunities particularly if there are licensed  NOVUS lawyers out there.  It could also be considered a regulatory taking. If X student paid the tuition, spent the time etc and had this education and was penalized for earning it that could also be an issue.

Then as a low test as it is what is the rational basis for preventing someone from saying they attended a school they actually attended.

 There are so many issues with that law as applied, which is why I would be fascinated to hear of any actual case where someone was prosecuted for attending Novus or any of the schools mentioned in that list. I find it highly unlikely it has ever occurred, but again if there is an actual case I would love to read about it.


 13 
 on: Yesterday at 04:41:54 PM 
Started by Tonyworks4u - Last post by Maintain FL 350
Exactly and if someone went to Novus Law School and  held themselves out as a lawyer obtained payment and did not have a license to practice law then it would be a crime.

Although I definitely agree with that statement, it does sound like the TX statute goes a little further. It seems to say that you can't use an unaccredited degree to obtain a financial benefit. So, if you applied for a job as a law professor and used an unaccredited degree as your qualification, then you'd presumably be in violation.

Here's where I think these kinds of rules would be really hard to enforce, though:

What if a guy applies for a job as say, an insurance adjuster and lists the Novus degree on his resume? He's not saying "Hire me because I'm a lawyer". In fact, the degree isn't even required for the job.

The prosecutor would have to prove that he listed the degree in order to get hired, and that his intent was to make the employer rely on the degree. At the very least you would have to establish that the defendant knew the employer was relying on the degree. That would be very hard to prove. If the employer calls the guy and says "What's this Novus degree?", and the guy simply says "It's an unaccredited law degree", then I think there is no violation at all. At that point there would be no intent.

 14 
 on: Yesterday at 03:17:17 PM 
Started by lawguy - Last post by Citylaw
People make mistakes and professors are wrong from time to time.  Additionally, when it comes to bar admission the only people you can believe are the people issuing the license.

There are always a bunch of rumors etc about x, y, z, but never rely on them until you check the with the actual people or organization in charge of making the decision.




 15 
 on: Yesterday at 03:13:17 PM 
Started by Tonyworks4u - Last post by Citylaw
Exactly and if someone went to Novus Law School and  held themselves out as a lawyer obtained payment and did not have a license to practice law then it would be a crime.

However, if someone gets a license to practice law in Texas with a Novus Degree then they are a licensed lawyer. I don't know if a Novus Grad could even get a license to practice law in Texas or anywhere, but if they did then they are a lawyer.

Additionally, there are countless City, County and Local Regulations that are never enforced. I am a City Attorney and know there are several misdemeanors in our Municipal Code that are completely illegal to enforce and we don't.   If a Novus Grad has been incarcerated for saying they attended a school that they attended then I really want to hear about it.

 I would be really interested to read more about, but I find it very unlikely that it has ever occurred. Even if it didn't occur as Novus if any student was arrested for simply attending any of the schools on that list please share it. I am sincerely interested to learn more about how that occurred, but again I doubt it has ever happened, but crazier things have happened in this world.





 16 
 on: Yesterday at 02:32:01 PM 
Started by Tonyworks4u - Last post by Maintain FL 350
Two points:

1) The FL story is inapplicable because that guy clearly lied about having any degree, not just an unaccredited degree. The intent to deceive was obvious.

2) The TX statute you cited pretty much backs up what I posted earlier: if you use an unaccredited degree to gain pecuniary benefits or to otherwise deceive, then you have committed a crime in certain jurisdictions. In other jurisdictions, it would be totally fine.

Even in TX, however, just listing the degree does not appear to be a crime. You would have to somehow use the title to gain a financial benefit. Don't worry, when you go to law school they will teach you how to read statutory language.   

 17 
 on: Yesterday at 01:18:20 PM 
Started by Tonyworks4u - Last post by Citylaw
Your story involves a Professor who said he attended a University and earned a Doctorate, but he never attended the University or earned a doctorate. He went on to create a forged diploma. That is obviously a crime.

However, attending Novus Law School and saying you attended Novus Law School is a not a crime.

I was actually very interested in learning about Novus Grads being prosecuted for telling the truth on their resume, but it was a pointless exaggeration. The internet is well known for pointless exaggerations and it is probably good for boards like this. 

Seriously, if you do hear of Novus Grads going to jail for saying they attended a school they actually attended please share on this thread.




 18 
 on: Yesterday at 12:59:24 PM 
Started by Tonyworks4u - Last post by lawguy
So to sum it all up if a Novus Law Grad claims to be licensed to practice law and is not then a crime has been committed. Pretending to be licensed when you are not is the unauthorized practice of law and a crime etc. However, even I as an ABA law school graduate licensed in California cannot go into a New York Court and say I am licensed, because I am not licensed in New York and saying I was would be a crime.   A Harvard grad that never passed or took the bar is also not licensed and has as much right to represent someone in court as an unlicensed Novus Grad does. If an unlicensed Harvard grad goes int court and claims to be licensed then the Harvard grad committed a crime.

If a Novus Grad somehow, becomes licensed to practice law in a state then they are licensed to practice law. Whether a Novus grad can obtain a license is a question I can't answer, but I do know that attending a school and putting a school that you actually attended on your resume is not a crime. If you claim that the degree you got from Novus makes you a licensed surgeon, therapist, etc again that would a be a crime, but if attended Novus Law School and graduate from Novus Law School then saying you attended Novus law school is not a crime.

  In all honesty, if a Novus Grad has been arrested, convicted, etc for telling the truth on their resume then I really want to know more about it and please share.

I would not recommend going to an unaccredited school, but you will not go to jail for it. If Novus is accredited by a state bar or something then more power to it, but I don't know anything about the school other than it is not ABA approved. However, there are plenty of successful California Bar School graduates out there and if a Novus Grad gets licensed to practice law then they have as much right as any other attorney in that state to practice law.
mentioning that apples grow on trees (as true as that is) doesn't change that they have seeds
.............can't imagine how this is hard for anyone with a GED let alone a JD.

 19 
 on: Yesterday at 12:56:31 PM 
Started by Tonyworks4u - Last post by lawguy
That is not an answer to the question show me Novus Grads arrested.

The professor claimed to go a institution that he never attended. That is fraud, but getting a degree from Novus is not a crime.

Big difference.

You said Novus grads were arrested and went to jail. I really want that story.
I honestly can't imagine adding more qualifier or having it more spoon fed than as I ACTUALLY WROTE it.
Go back and read it a loop if you want (all you have to do is scroll up)
I NEVER said that they "did" go to jail (just that they can-and I spoon fed an example to go that a ten second google search could find)
Side topic (that I went out of my way to explain were side topics) were brought up on resumes and a few other topics as well (thus some of my other content)

It is that simple.

 20 
 on: Yesterday at 12:12:08 PM 
Started by Tonyworks4u - Last post by Citylaw
So to sum it all up if a Novus Law Grad claims to be licensed to practice law and is not then a crime has been committed. Pretending to be licensed when you are not is the unauthorized practice of law and a crime etc. However, even I as an ABA law school graduate licensed in California cannot go into a New York Court and say I am licensed, because I am not licensed in New York and saying I was would be a crime.   A Harvard grad that never passed or took the bar is also not licensed and has as much right to represent someone in court as an unlicensed Novus Grad does. If an unlicensed Harvard grad goes int court and claims to be licensed then the Harvard grad committed a crime.

If a Novus Grad somehow, becomes licensed to practice law in a state then they are licensed to practice law. Whether a Novus grad can obtain a license is a question I can't answer, but I do know that attending a school and putting a school that you actually attended on your resume is not a crime. If you claim that the degree you got from Novus makes you a licensed surgeon, therapist, etc again that would a be a crime, but if attended Novus Law School and graduate from Novus Law School then saying you attended Novus law school is not a crime.

  In all honesty, if a Novus Grad has been arrested, convicted, etc for telling the truth on their resume then I really want to know more about it and please share.

I would not recommend going to an unaccredited school, but you will not go to jail for it. If Novus is accredited by a state bar or something then more power to it, but I don't know anything about the school other than it is not ABA approved. However, there are plenty of successful California Bar School graduates out there and if a Novus Grad gets licensed to practice law then they have as much right as any other attorney in that state to practice law.




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