Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
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 11 
 on: November 22, 2014, 09:49:41 PM 
Started by samthehumble - Last post by cusc2011
I plan to attend a LLM at a ABA approved school.  For the California Bar, the LLM can be from an ABA approved school or a California approved law school.


 12 
 on: November 22, 2014, 07:36:13 PM 
Started by samthehumble - Last post by I.M.D.Law
I still have to do an LLM in US Law which is only 1 yr of additional study.
Pick a location to take it at yet, or exploring all options for awhile?
If its CA, does it have to be an ABA LLM, or can you do it at one of the non ABA online deals?

 13 
 on: November 22, 2014, 07:15:14 PM 
Started by samthehumble - Last post by cusc2011
I still have to do an LLM in US Law which is only 1 yr of additional study.

 14 
 on: November 22, 2014, 06:14:49 PM 
Started by I.M.D.Law - Last post by I.M.D.Law
I got bored and looked up LLM stuff (just in case I ever wanted to punish myself someday for no good reason) and noticed that some ABA approved law schools appear to not require the full 90 credits for a JD.
example:
http://www.law.northwestern.edu/admissions/facts/documents/2013-ABA-Standard-509-Information-Report.pdf
"Number of credit hours required to graduate 84"


I thought 90 credits was an ABA requirement?

 15 
 on: November 22, 2014, 06:12:28 PM 
Started by samthehumble - Last post by I.M.D.Law
I had my LLB evaluated from a credential evaluation agency that is on the California Bar Examiner list of approved evaluators.  The results came back today and the overall summary of my evaluation is that my LLB from the UK is equivalent to a JD in the United States.
So are they going to let you sit it, or do you have to take extra classes first?

 16 
 on: November 22, 2014, 02:53:07 PM 
Started by samthehumble - Last post by cusc2011
I had my LLB evaluated from a credential evaluation agency that is on the California Bar Examiner list of approved evaluators.  The results came back today and the overall summary of my evaluation is that my LLB from the UK is equivalent to a JD in the United States. 

 17 
 on: November 20, 2014, 08:23:25 PM 
Started by I.M.D.Law - Last post by Citylaw
I used it once in trial court and cited this case. Warner Bros. Records v. Golden West Music Sales, 36 Cal. App. 3d 1012

It was kind of a stretch, but it worked. In my case this woman abandoned her property, but did put it into a living trust after six months of searching for her, I filed the lawsuit, and served the attorney that assisted her with forming the living trust who also could not find her. The Judge did not want to notice by publication, and said service on that attorney and recording a Lis Pendens was sufficient.




 18 
 on: November 19, 2014, 09:01:34 PM 
Started by I.M.D.Law - Last post by Groundhog
I'm far from an expert on California civil procedure, but where do you see the good enough summons for persons generally? I don't see it in the statute. Is it in the caselaw?

 19 
 on: November 19, 2014, 08:29:00 PM 
Started by I.M.D.Law - Last post by Citylaw
Some states like California have special statutes that "basically allow for good enough' i.e. California Code of Civil Procedure 416.90.

 20 
 on: November 19, 2014, 06:25:07 PM 
Started by I.M.D.Law - Last post by I.M.D.Law
That probably makes sense, but it is still tough to distinguish. Notice by publication is always a remedy available, but I guess as Newspapers die out the internet is the better source to provide adequate notice
I still support notice by publication, but I'd support making it a rule to require them to at least try (at the same time) to text, email, facebook/etc the person while putting it in the paper (increased odds, not decreased) That would seem reasonable to me to reduce odds of "but I didn't read it" tear jerk stories from people actively trying to avoid service.

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