Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
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 1 
 on: Yesterday at 10:29:45 PM 
Started by newbie123 - Last post by newbie123
Hello and I apologize in advance for being another "can I get in IF" poster. I looked on a lot of different sites to find a similar situation to mine but can't seem to find one. I will keep this as brief as possible.

I never went to class during my undergrad because I was off getting "the college experience." I earned, if you can call it that, a B.S. in Human Resource Management with a lousy 2.06 GPA. A couple of years later I am here regretting it in the worst way as I now want to follow in my father's footsteps and become an attorney. I am not, however, trying to do it on his level (hence the subject of this thread). He was 3.98 for undergrad, 4.0 mba, 174 lsat, and 3.9 law school.

So here is the question: What do I need to do in order to get into West Virginia Law?

I work in admissions now at a college and they have offered to pay 100% for me to get my MBA through them but trust me, its not a well respected MBA program. For weeks I have been reading about people with similar GPAs to mine asking how to get into a top tier school and everyone has said, knock the GMAT out of the park, get a 4.0 in your MBA, score at least a 170 on the LSAT, have your letters of recommendation be from Barack and Michelle, rub your tummy 3 times, and submit your application on the 2nd Tuesday in the month after never. As I state before, however, I want to go to WVU not Harvard so what does my course of action need to include?

Thank you all for your help. I know this question is asked a lot on so many different levels.


Edit: The part where I said "not trying to do it on his same level" does not mean I do not want to work as hard as my Dad did. It just means I am not looking for admissions to top tier schools like he did (Yale) because I realize that my UGPA already eliminated me from those.


 2 
 on: Yesterday at 09:17:30 PM 
Started by lrt8000 - Last post by lrt8000
African-American students at Washington and Lee law are protesting the continuing racism at Washington and Lee law. Here are their demands

"1. We demand that the University fully recognize Martin Luther King, Jr. Day on the undergraduate campus.

2. We demand that the University stop allowing neo-confederates to march on campus with confederate flags on Lee-Jackson Day.

3. We demand that the University immediately remove all confederate flags from its property and premises, including those flags located within Lee Chapel.

4. We demand that the University issue an official apology for the University’s participation in chattel slavery, including a denunciation of General Robert E. Lee’s participation in slavery.

If the school does not act by SEPTEMBER 1, 2014 we WILL engage in civil disobedience." [http://abovethelaw.com/2014/04/wherein-black-people-have-to-go-to-school-with-confederates/#more-312824]

It is astonishing that an educational institution would still be honoring the confederacy and the confederate flag 150 years after the Emancipation Proclamation. Why would any African-American want to go to Washington and Lee? Why would any right thinking person want to go to Washington and Lee?

 3 
 on: Yesterday at 09:10:50 PM 
Started by lrt8000 - Last post by lrt8000
African-American students at Washington and Lee law are protesting the continuing racism at Washington and Lee law. Here are their demands

"1. We demand that the University fully recognize Martin Luther King, Jr. Day on the undergraduate campus.

2. We demand that the University stop allowing neo-confederates to march on campus with confederate flags on Lee-Jackson Day.

3. We demand that the University immediately remove all confederate flags from its property and premises, including those flags located within Lee Chapel.

4. We demand that the University issue an official apology for the University’s participation in chattel slavery, including a denunciation of General Robert E. Lee’s participation in slavery.

If the school does not act by SEPTEMBER 1, 2014 we WILL engage in civil disobedience." [http://abovethelaw.com/2014/04/wherein-black-people-have-to-go-to-school-with-confederates/#more-312824]

It is astonishing that an educational institution would still be honoring the confederacy and the confederate flag 150 years after the Emancipation Proclamation. Why would any African-American want to go to Washington and Lee? Why would any right thinking person want to go to Washington and Lee?

 4 
 on: Yesterday at 11:08:57 AM 
Started by CA Law Dean - Last post by CA Law Dean
Update on MCL's Master of Legal Studies degree program. In addition to the description in the previous post, please note that changes in the California accredited law school regulations now permit a transfer student in the MLS degree program to continue in the JD program if their grades improve to meet the 70.00 minimum standard for progressing in JD degree program. Therefore, a law student who had a poor academic experience in another law school, but who might thrive in the smaller, hands-on, academically supportive environment of MCL, could still get back on track for the JD through the MLS degree program. Furthermore, if students successfully complete the mandatory MLS writing program, they may be eligible to graduate with both the MLS and JD degree. Please let me know if you have questions about MCL's concurrent MLS/JD degree program. It is new for the 2014-2015 academic year.

 5 
 on: Yesterday at 10:55:00 AM 
Started by CA Law Dean - Last post by CA Law Dean
Just a short reminder that Monterey College of Law is till accepting applications for the Fall 2015 semester. If you are considering law school, which I assume you are if you are following this discussion board, there is still time to take the June LSAT and apply for fall admissions. MCL is one of the California accredited law schools that will conditionally admit you to Fall 2015 subject to getting the results of the June LSAT. Therefore, if you are considering a fall admission, you should go ahead and submit your application and not wait for the June LSAT results. We also have a very popular summer Jurisprudence course that starts  the first week of July, but you need to have been admitted or conditionally admitted to be eligible to take the course. Let me know if you have any questions about admissions criteria or process.

 6 
 on: Yesterday at 10:42:40 AM 
Started by futureoptimist - Last post by CA Law Dean
I agree with all of the previous advice and would add one additional consideration. If you have really turned your academic attitude around and believe that you have the initiative to buckle down and get your CPA, you might reconsider attending one of the California accredited law schools instead. First, you will be eligible with your GPA and a 150 LSAT. Second, you can work during the day and attend law school at night to reduce the financial burden and to start getting experience by working in a law firm. Third, these are smaller programs where you will get more attention and academic support. This will be a different experience than the large public school education that you are getting at Davis. Finally, in about the same time that it sounds like you will need to get your CPA (3 years), if you really buckled down as you have indicated you are ready to do, you could be finished with your law degree and begin studying for the bar exam.

So I think that the real question is what you envision for your career. If you are ready to do the work necessary to become a lawyer, why go become a CPA? On the other hand, if being a CPA sounds interesting, you should go do that. Both routes will take a dedicated effort that requires a serious focus and commitment. I think that is the first decision.

Let me know if you are interested in more information about the California accredited law schools. Lincoln Sacramento is close to you in Davis and there are 15 other programs such as ours at Monterey College of Law. Each have somewhat unique characteristics and locations that would likely serve whichever region that you see yourself living and working after graduation.

 7 
 on: Yesterday at 10:18:10 AM 
Started by nreese - Last post by CA Law Dean
I generally agree with Citylaw, but will take a different approach here.

Why do some law school graduates never “practice” law? I can answer this question from my own professional experience. Throughout the course of my 35+ year career, my law degree has provided me the opportunity to enjoy a range of different, interesting, challenging . . .  and occasionally profitable . . . professional opportunities. Of course, none have been as rewarding as serving as dean of MCL!

I must admit that I didn’t attend law school with the intention of practicing law in a traditional law firm setting. My first interest was politics, but after internships in state and national congressional offices . . . let’s just say I grew out of that phase. Early in my career, I practiced law as an Asst. State Attorney General. I enjoyed the public policy aspects of the work and the collegiality of working in a legal team environment. However, with an interest in economics and marketing, and a booming economy at the time, I was drawn towards the broader challenges and opportunities in the private business sector. As a management consultant, venture capitalist, public company executive, and entrepreneur, I put my legal education to great use . . .  even though I wasn’t “practicing law.”

One of the most valuable aspects of a legal education is the versatility of the training and the opportunity to integrate it into so many different professions. As a management consultant, I developed a niche practice of law firm consulting, working with individual lawyers and large firms to develop professional marketing plans. This lead me into CLE training for lawyers and eventually back into the law school classroom as a law professor in the areas of law office management, legal ethics, and law-related technology.

To bring the story full circle, it turns out that a combination of law, business, and legal education experience is also a great combination for law school administration . . . and here I am!

So to answer the question, “why do some law school graduates never practice law” . . . I would say that it is because some of us got too busy using our legal education.

 8 
 on: Yesterday at 10:11:17 AM 
Started by mychan24 - Last post by CA Law Dean
I am familiar with Concord's EJD program and would agree with the advice here. Not because the program is faulty, it is not in my opinion. However, it does not appear to meet the OPs needs, which appear to be having a useful degree that will benefit their law career interests. I also agree that if the OP was rejected from Concord's JD program, they probably need to (prepare first) and retake the LSAT.

Now to actually answer the question about DL alternatives, I suggest looking at Cal Southern. www.calsouthern.edu/online-law-degrees.

Like all of the online programs, since Cal Southern has almost open enrollment, the bar pass rates are very very low. However, the curriculum is sound, you have to pass the baby bar to progress to second year, and if you are a serious student, you will be eligible to sit for the California Bar exam upon completion . . . something not available through the EJD program.  We use Cal Southern to resolve scheduling conflicts when our students end up with two required courses on the same night and need a DL alternative to avoid waiting an extra year to finish our JD program.

The following link is to all of the correspondence and distance law schools in California:
www.admissions.calbar.ca.gov/Education/LegalEducation/LawSchools.aspx

 9 
 on: Yesterday at 09:49:51 AM 
Started by etmerian - Last post by CA Law Dean
I am sorry to hear that you were rejected from your law school choice. It is always disappointing, regardless of age and experience. If you will share your LSAT/UGPA, I can probably give you a better idea of what influenced the decision. Despite the applicant friendly admissions cycle this year, it still requires understanding the criteria of the target school to better judge your application prospects. In your case, despite having college grades that are likely several decades old (assuming college was prior to the birth of your 22 year old child), the formula of LSAT/UGPA still overshadows any work-life experience for traditional law schools. When you said "I.U" did you mean Indiana University, and if yes, was it Bloomington or Indianapolis?

 10 
 on: April 14, 2014, 09:34:23 PM 
Started by mychan24 - Last post by jonlevy
Since Concord unlike any other DL law School is actually a regionally accredited school same as any university through its affiliation with Kaplan, the EJD is similar to a MLS (Masters in Legal Studies).  The 2 year MLS which Kaplan offers is actually a more versatile degree and is useful in government and for advancement as a paralegal.  Neither one will qualify you to be a lawyer though. It is possible Concord filled its quota (though hard to believe) and had spaces in the EJD.  More likely your writing and academic skills were not up to snuff according to Concord and thus they thought you a poor candidate to get past the FYLSE.

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