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31
tabula raza be damned...  ::)

Spelling be damned...   ;)

Edited.  Been a few years since I read Locke... even longer since I took a Latin class.


woo hoo; a fellow Latin language student :) thinking of declensions is giving me a headache...

I took 3 years of Latin in highschool, then couldn't test out of it for college so I had to take another two semesters (or was it 4?) as an undergrad.  And sadly, I've retained very little.  I did name my fantasy baseball team Tabula Rasa this year, so I guess I remembered something. 

32
Suffolk (FT days)

33
You're one of my favorites, Likewise. Everything that you say makes sense and is decent.

Yeah, I hate to join in on a suckfest, but I agree.

34
Minority and Non-Traditional Law Students / Re: Giving notice
« on: April 26, 2006, 10:40:19 PM »
Aha, so am I snarky or astute? 

Maki, I didn't consider a work from home situation.  Obviously a face-to-face discussion isn't necessary in that situation.  But I would think thatg a follow-up snail-mail letter would still be appropriate. 

Saxby, I don't care what you think about "some people." 

35
Minority and Non-Traditional Law Students / Re: Giving notice
« on: April 24, 2006, 11:14:47 AM »

now, to do it over the phone or email....  :-\

Are you kidding?  You give your notice in person and you also provide a letter.  Neither phone nor email is appropriate. 

To the OP, I guess you need to determine how long they'll let you work there after you give your notice.  If they'll let you stick around as long as you want, then you should give your notice ASAP, especially in light of the project situation you mentioned.  But I've had jobs where you give your notice and they show you the door.  If it is one of those situations, then you really have no choice but to wait until 2 weeks out.  However, I can't help but think that it is entirely disingenuous to accept that promotion you speak of when you plan on skipping out the door in 2-3 months.  I don't know what you should do, but it sounds like a delicate situation that warrants careful consideration.

36
Norcal, I try not to make judgements on people (usually unsuccessfuuly) and I try not to verbalize judgements (I'm usually successful with this one) but you've spent so much time stating and defending your position that I think you're fair game.  And this has nothing to do with kids. 

Your narrow view of what is an acceptable life is sad.  I hope and expect you'll outgrow this. 

37

Modest house (and I'm really saying modest, not too small, but nothing spectacular): $1.5m, @ 6%: $9000/mo
Taxes: $16000 yr
Insurance: $2000 yr
Maintenance + Utilities: $10000
Other than kid expenses: $20k/yr (I can live off that, includes food, a run-of-the-mill Honda, etc)
Savings: $10k/yr
-----------------------------------------
total: $166k

AMT kicks in, assume 35% overall federal + state tax rate.

income necessary before even CONSIDERING a kid: $255k

-------------------------------------------------------------

Kid expenses: $6k/yr (summer camps, food, etc, etc)
Kid education: $25k/yr (K-12, $50k/yr college)

Not tax deductible, so, another $31/.65 = ~ $47k -- even more at college, but less early on, so evens out


You forgot the final line:

Having kids: PRICELESS



I have to add that if you honestly believe you need an over/under income level to have kids, you're a fool.  There's nothing wrong with deciding not to have kids; it is understandable to NOT want to give 20 years of your life and hundreds of thousands of dollars away.  But that is a decision you have to find within yourself, NOT WITHIN YOUR WALLET.

The best advice I ever heard on this topic (which I ignored, BTW) was simple: If you wait until you can afford children, you'll never have kids.  To me, it seems like you can never afford kids, yet you can always afford them.  Kind of a paradox, but its true.     

38

Modest house (and I'm really saying modest, not too small, but nothing spectacular): $1.5m, @ 6%: $9000/mo
Taxes: $16000 yr
Insurance: $2000 yr
Maintenance + Utilities: $10000
Other than kid expenses: $20k/yr (I can live off that, includes food, a run-of-the-mill Honda, etc)
Savings: $10k/yr
-----------------------------------------
total: $166k

AMT kicks in, assume 35% overall federal + state tax rate.

income necessary before even CONSIDERING a kid: $255k

-------------------------------------------------------------

Kid expenses: $6k/yr (summer camps, food, etc, etc)
Kid education: $25k/yr (K-12, $50k/yr college)

Not tax deductible, so, another $31/.65 = ~ $47k -- even more at college, but less early on, so evens out


You forgot the final line:

Having kids: PRICELESS


39
Choosing the Right Law School / Re: Give up T1 for a T4?
« on: April 11, 2006, 06:03:38 AM »
In my case, the T1 is between 30-50. The T1 requires a move, the T4 is local and less expensive, in a city I prefer to be in. But I'm interested in other people's situations as well. I'm also wondering if I'll do better if I attend a less competitive school?

I would say it all depends on where you want to practice, and the quality of the T4 you're considering.  Schools 30-50 are not national schools, regardless of what tier you put them in.  If you want to live and practice in the city where that tier 1 is, then you'll probably be better off there.  But if you're thinking about going to school there, then coming home, you might not be better off.  Because quality of the Tier 4 schools vary greatly. 

My situation isn't completely similar, because I wasn't moving my family no matter what.  As such, I only applied to local schools.  But, had I sent applications to schools 30-50, I think I could have gotten somebody to bite on me.  It wasn't worth it though, becuase I want to practice in Boston.  And I'm pretty sure that I'll have a better chance getting a job in Boston coming out of Suffolk (which has numbers comparable to a lot of T2 schools, BTW) than I would coming out of Ohio State, or Alabama-Tuscaloosa.  But I wouldn't feel as confident if the Tier 4 I was attending didn't place well.


40
Financial Aid / Re: Appealing a Financial Aid Offer
« on: March 31, 2006, 03:13:04 PM »
Ever since the very beginning of the law school application process, Michigan has been my dream school.  Now that the dream has the potential to become real, however, I realize that I may not be able to afford it.  Despite the fact that my parents combined income fits us solidly into middle class territory and that I stipulated on the Need Access form that my parents won't be contributing anything to my law school expenses, I was offered a package of nothing but the standard federal loans.  According to Michigan's web site, "in the 2005 entering class, 80 percent of students received some form of grant, in an average amount of $8,600. 51 percent of first-year students received grants based on financial need; 36 percent received grants based on academic merit; 7 percent received a combination."

Given this information, I find it hard to believe that my situation wouldn't qualify me for need-based grant aid.  What should I do?  The fin. aid email says that Michigan would be happy to re-evaluate my fin. aid application in light of special circumstances, but that the process wouldn't begin until mid-September.  I LOVE Michigan, but I'm not sure I'll be able to go there without any need-based help. 

Any advice or input you can offer as to what I can do to receive a grant prior to enrolling would be very, very much appreciated...

I can only speak for Suffolk, but thay made it clear that they would only reconsider your financial aid package if you have some new or different information.  IOW, they won't give you any money if you say, "but please, that just isn't enough . . . "

I got laid off last friday and my prospects of finding a new job that will let me work full time until August and then 10-15 hrs per week thereafter are slim, so I plan on appealing my financial aid decision.  But I'm not expecting much . . .

FWIW, I heard from Suffolk again today, after apealing for more aid based on my recent layoff.  They gave me an addional $1,000 grand and an additional $1,500 interest-free loan.  Seems fair enough to me it was about whatg I expected.

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