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Messages - Contract2008

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21
Where should I go next fall? / Re: Mercer Law 1L taking questions
« on: February 14, 2010, 04:26:01 PM »
Haldo.  If anybody has any questions for me, either about Mercer or about law school in general, let me know.  I'll do my best to answer them!

What's your expected salary range once you've graduted? 

22
Reviews, Visits, and Rankings / Re: Excursion: A Law Job
« on: February 13, 2010, 05:26:44 PM »
Quote

In short, your answer to my second question is "no?"  



There are several possible answers, actually.  At the risk of taking this thread a bit too far afield (from its focus on transfer-friendly schools), I'm reminded of what just about every lawyer I know would say.  Actually, that's not quite right.  I can't think of a lawyer for whom "No" wouldn't be the most polite answer.

In any event, that is not I.  So, help me along.  What sort of law job are you seeking?  What and where do you hope to practice?

Thane.

Step being so serious.  I am just playing with you. 

23
Reviews, Visits, and Rankings / Re: Transfer Friendly Law Schools
« on: February 11, 2010, 01:54:20 PM »
Anyone know which schools are transfer friendly?

There's a book out on this if it's not been mentioned.  It's title is The Art of the Law School Transfer, by Andrew Carrabis and Seth Haimovitch.

Transferring law schools is trickier than it might at first seem, and comes with numerous personal considerations, among them a loss of GPA at the new school, often a last-in-line position for course selection and scholarships, and feelings of loneliness among a new crowd.  For the right person it can be a great opportunity, but it's important to go into it with one's eyes open.  

Importantly, for those considering transferring for the job benefits, those are real.  Interviewers will be curious, but not (usually) in the negative sense.  They'll be impressed by your motivation and perseverance, and will want to know that you can handle yourself.  As most transfer up, the vocational boost can be quite significant.

Also, the deadlines for transfer applications are quite strict.  (And, unlike most applications, the final decision on transfer applicants is often made by the dean of admissions personally.)  Of special imporance are grades, both in what they are and in getting them in on time.

Best of luck to you,

Thane.

Where do you practice now?  Can you hook me up with a job?


Contract2008 & All -

As I now teach primarily, after years of practice, I am likely not to be entirely helpful, depending upon your preferences and particulars.

I might also relate a personal history, as I too faced a market much like this one, many moons ago, and as I have traveled to numerous law schools and seen similar questions being asked of visiting associates, partners, and even judges.  So, my perspective is perhaps unique.

For a number of reasons, this is unlikely to be a successful approach.  Among the reasons are that attorneys are intensely jealous of their reputation, which, in practice, is pretty much one's paycheck.  With regard to employment inquiries, few attorneys would refer a prospective attorney to another attorney, absent a reasonably serious basis for the recommendation.  This might be a clerkship, part-time job, or possibly some extended personal knowledge (such as a family connection).  One might think of a snooty version of some episode of Masterpiece Theatre, which isn't too far off the mark, actually.  The exceptions to this actually prove the rule: I've seen "recommendations" that all-but-kill an applicant's chances with some version of "I had to give this person your name, I'm sorry, but just to be sure you get the message I have absolutely nothing to go on..."  That, of course, is just about the kiss of death for that law office, regardless of the qualifications.  (Exception to exception: "I have absolutely nothing to go on but I think she's editor-in-chief at the Stanford Law Review."  That takes it from trash can to edge of desk just above can.)

For ideas on jobs, starting your practice, and overall success, if you can find a copy of my book in the library that might be helfpul.  (For different reasons, either one will suffice.)  There's also The Insider's Guide to Getting a Big Firm Job (somewhat badly named, as it's applicable to all law jobs), on interviewing.  And either of Morten Lund's books is excellent.  Read any of these and that job is much closer.

Best of luck to you,

Thane.  


In short, your answer to my second question is "no?" 



24
Reviews, Visits, and Rankings / Re: University of Illinois at Urbana
« on: February 08, 2010, 05:40:59 PM »
Hello everyone,

Any help really appreciated.

I've been admitted to U. Illinois-Urbana with a full scholarship. Being a T1 (23) I assume that it places well on the Chicago market. But I'm not sure if I want to live there after graduation.

Does anyone have any information about how this school places nationally? The full scholarship is very tempting :) Im also considering Minn with no $$.

Thank you :)


Where do you want to live? 

25
Reviews, Visits, and Rankings / Re: Transfer Friendly Law Schools
« on: February 08, 2010, 05:36:10 PM »
How well would I have to do at Ohio Northern to transfer to a Low T1/High T2 school?

Top 20% or so.

26
Reviews, Visits, and Rankings / Re: Transfer Friendly Law Schools
« on: February 06, 2010, 02:01:30 PM »
Anyone know which schools are transfer friendly?

There's a book out on this if it's not been mentioned.  It's title is The Art of the Law School Transfer, by Andrew Carrabis and Seth Haimovitch.

Transferring law schools is trickier than it might at first seem, and comes with numerous personal considerations, among them a loss of GPA at the new school, often a last-in-line position for course selection and scholarships, and feelings of loneliness among a new crowd.  For the right person it can be a great opportunity, but it's important to go into it with one's eyes open. 

Importantly, for those considering transferring for the job benefits, those are real.  Interviewers will be curious, but not (usually) in the negative sense.  They'll be impressed by your motivation and perseverance, and will want to know that you can handle yourself.  As most transfer up, the vocational boost can be quite significant.

Also, the deadlines for transfer applications are quite strict.  (And, unlike most applications, the final decision on transfer applicants is often made by the dean of admissions personally.)  Of special imporance are grades, both in what they are and in getting them in on time.

Best of luck to you,

Thane.

Where do you practice now?  Can you hook me up with a job?

27
Where should I go next fall? / Re: UVa3L taking questions
« on: February 02, 2010, 08:11:15 PM »
I am a Virginia resident who got placed on waitlistin UVA.  I contacted admissions and the DEAN told me that I was special but they had 35 candidates for each out-of-state spot and therefore had to utilize waitlist.  I emailed him saying that I am in-state, and he has been silent since...  Any idea on future steps?

Wake up! They don't want you.   ;D

28
Where should I go next fall? / Re: Big Law Job after T2 Law School
« on: January 31, 2010, 12:28:37 AM »
Yes. Besides, the only way you would get a biglaw job would be to be in the top 5-10% of the class- which means you will stand out with magna cum laude and law review on your resume.

The only way?  I know tier 3 grad with median or below median grade who got into biglaw.  No, he was not on law review either, or any journal for that matter, but he is black though.

There are other ways to get into biglaw other than top school or top grades. 

29
3L job search / Re: firstlawjob.com a godsend or a gimmick
« on: January 30, 2010, 11:52:19 PM »
I don't buy that.  YLS students are never going to struggle to find work.  It's self-selection.  My guess is most YLS feel they are entitled to top vault firms and that's it.  Most probably don't even look at those outside the Vault 100.

If a YLS student contacted a mid-size, market paying firm, they'd jump all over them.  At the end of the day, law firms view lawyers as marketing tools.  YLS' JD carries a strong marketing pitch with it. 

Your explanation sounds plausible and since I am not looking over people's shoulders to see what firms they are applying to, you could be right. The person I'm closest to in this situation, however, is looking in a specific market and is having difficulty finding a job.

But to qualm my own insecurities, do you think if a YLS student got an offer revoked because of the economy, he/she would have much trouble finding a firm job in a secondary market (South Carolina, NC, Georgia, etc)?

Since when is South Carolina a secondary market?  I thought Dallas, St. Louis, Houston, etc. are secondary market.  I don't know of any market in South Carolina that's comparable to the cities I have mentioned. 

30
3L job search / Re: Studying for the BAR, huge DEBT, no JOB, WHAT DO DO?
« on: January 28, 2010, 08:26:35 PM »
Bump.

Just got rejected by a good firm. Blargh. How is everyone else doing?


Well, I got rejected from that job I interviewed for and really wanted.  Though things are looking up now... I just got re-hired as a Law Clerk at the firm I worked for before 3L.  It doesnt pay much, but at least its SOMETHING.  I dont want to become an actual attorney for the firm though, as I hate family law and they focus on family law.  I'm just going to keep applying and work this crappy job until something pops!  Good luck to everyone and dont give up hope!

How are things looking up? 

What state are you in?

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