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Messages - ilsox7

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61
Reviews, Visits, and Rankings / Re: Northwestern 1L Taking Questions
« on: November 29, 2007, 04:36:38 PM »
Yeah, I wouldn't recommend living in Lincoln Park or anything. But if you've been around Chicago long enough, you've probably noticed that there is a CTA "funding crisis" every single year. Its a way for the downstate legislators to extract as many goodies as possible (the pork du jour this year is road and bridge money) by holding up transit funding. Like clockwork, all the papers say that every single bus line is going to be cut and the subway fares are going to go up to $45 dollars or something. But its never happened. The governor has already bailed us out twice to make the speaker look like a jerk for not passing his budget. The CTA is by no means in good shape, but this happens all the time.

But I'm happy to answer any law school related questions.

Well, this is the first time in a couple of years the crisis has hit this level.  And I've researched quite a bit (plus I ride many times a week) and it's worse this time, IMO.  In fact, I would rather the CTA shut down for a week just to stick it to the politicians downstate.  The system is in disrepair.  It needs more than the operational gap funding of $300MM+ next year.  It needs a long term plan to fund it BILLIONS of dollars.  And I fear the only way it will get that is if we get the Olympics.  Sadly, politics in IL are about as corrupt as it comes.  And our Governors suck.

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Reviews, Visits, and Rankings / Re: Northwestern 1L Taking Questions
« on: November 29, 2007, 04:23:07 PM »
The CTA thing is only really true if you live in Lincoln Square or something. If you live on the lakefront commuting will obviously be longer. Both the neighborhoods I suggested are on the Blue Line, which is one of the fastest. For like 10 months they had a slow zone near downtown while they fixed the tracks, but its fine now. So, okay, if you're going to the airport, or want to ride the Clark bus up to Wrigley Field or something, yeah, its going to take longer. But I get through downtown to the law school on the CTA in about 10 min.

Well, with the funding situation, there is no way to tell what is going to happen.  That's why I am saying it's completely up in the air.  And yes, coming from the north sucks.  My friends who live in Lakeview or Lincoln Park allow at least 45 minutes to get to Loyola.  And that's pretty ridiculous, compared to how it was 2 years ago. 

63
Reviews, Visits, and Rankings / Re: Northwestern 1L Taking Questions
« on: November 29, 2007, 04:13:21 PM »
I'll also assume (hope) you went to IU given your username.

64
Reviews, Visits, and Rankings / Re: Northwestern 1L Taking Questions
« on: November 29, 2007, 04:12:19 PM »
As a native Chicagoan, I would advise anyone against living there. You can easily live in the West Town neighborhood, where you can get a nice two-bedroom for $900 a month (pretty good by Chicago standards, but you can find stuff even cheaper if you put the effort in). and its right by the Blue Line subway, so you can be at the law school probably in around 30 min. I think its worth it to save the money, and I get lots of my reading done on the ride. Same deal with Wicker Park, which is one of the most fun neighborhoods in town (all sorts of bars, clubs, venues, etc.) Living expenses (groceries, etc.) are comparable with any big city.

With the current state of the CTA, I would advise people moving to Chicago for law school to live within walking distance or plan on 1 hour each way of commuting time.  Also, $1,700 is pretty high for a 1 BR.  I live on the Gold Coast and pay $1,250 for a big 1 BR with all utilities included.  The nice thing about Chicago is that you can live cheaply if you are willing to give up some luxuries.  However, with the current state of the CTA, commuting is a mess.

65
I will be the best wingman you've ever had next year in Nashville.

Wingmen are unnecessary here. Nashville girls are easy.

 :D

66
Where should I go next fall? / Re: Liberal Arts Majors: Any Regrets?
« on: November 29, 2007, 01:26:33 PM »
Business people tend to go out and drink.  A lot.  It's another form of networking.  And people laugh when I say that, but being able to drink in a "business setting" is EXTREMELY important to your career.

TITCR

Since many of the "professional" meetings I have been to have been in social settings like bars, restaurants, etc. I don't regret missing out on the library time I could've had if I had done fewer social activities. I would say that being able to handle yourself in a "bar" situation is an important skill for any professional to have.

Yep.  For instance, the full-time job I have for after the Bar had a happy hour a few weeks back.  After 4 or 5 hours of hanging out at the bar, trading stories and whatnot, they asked if I wanted to start hourly next semester.  Take the summer to study for he bar, then start up at the normal full-time start.  So now I get a few extra months to get used to this job, make some cash, and know these people on a more personal level.  That is all too common in business.

In fact, in my job straight out of undergrad, they basically made it known that you had better be social.  If you weren't, it hurt your career.

67
Where should I go next fall? / Re: Liberal Arts Majors: Any Regrets?
« on: November 29, 2007, 01:12:21 PM »
I love my business/finance/accounting friends.  Come to think of it, I hang out with way more business/engineering majors than liberal arts majors.

Business people tend to go out and drink.  A lot.  It's another form of networking.  And people laugh when I say that, but being able to drink in a "business setting" is EXTREMELY important to your career.

68
Where should I go next fall? / Re: Liberal Arts Majors: Any Regrets?
« on: November 29, 2007, 01:06:38 PM »

Dude, relax.  I'm joking.  I took a few business classes and it just wasn't particularly interesting to me.  I'm in a finance-oriented job and it's not particularly interesting to me.

I was a Poli Sci major and I have a "great" job that many of my currently "taking-some-time-off" friends would kill to have.  It's not bitterness or jealousy.  Just kidding around.

And I already apologized for my prior statement.


It's all good.  I edited after I saw your ETA.  I just found it ironic the perception some had of finance folks.  Granted, there are plenty of finance people out there who simply do manipulate excel, but they are going nowhere fast in their careers anyways.

69
Where should I go next fall? / Re: Liberal Arts Majors: Any Regrets?
« on: November 29, 2007, 01:05:00 PM »

Where did they network?  It's not as if your fellow English majors are useful.


It depends what you want to do.  There are a few starting points for networking.  The easiest one for most people is to start with family and family friends.  If there is ANYONE in that immediate network who either does something that you'd be interested in or works at a company that has a department you'd be interested in, talk to them.  Ask them out for lunch or coffee.  Ask them what they do.  Just don't go looking for a job.  The goal is to create relationships.  And these people will know other people that you can talk to.

If you're in a major market, there are often organizations like Toastmasters.  That particular organization focuses on becoming a better public speaker.  More importantly, it's a way to get to know people.  If you have any friends who were business majors and are at professional jobs, talk to them.  Again, they should know other people, too.

It's an arduous process and it will take time, but it's generally successful. 

I know some people who sat down and made a list of 50 people they knew.  They then contacted those people and from that got X more names.  You keep going until you figure out what you want to do and an opportunity arises.  Again, it's not an easy process.  And you have to be willing to face rejection and waiting.  All in all, be humble about it, don't ask everyone for a job, and just stay persistent.

70
Where should I go next fall? / Re: Liberal Arts Majors: Any Regrets?
« on: November 29, 2007, 12:57:19 PM »
Your perception of finance is wrong on many levels.

I love when you write these one-line posts telling other people they're wrong.  So helpful.

Well, you're wrong.  You think that finance professionals simply add and subtract using excel.  That's an ignorant thing to say, so what would you expect my response to be?  Do you want me to walk this thread through some basic finance skills that finance professionals know and use on a regular basis that go beyond adding and subtracting on excel?  Quite frankly, unless you like finance, that would be quite boring.  So by keeping it concise and just pointing out the error of your post, I accomplished the same thing.

You don't see me in here ripping people who were history or polysci majors, yet you feel like you know it all about something you probably have zero exposure to.

I'm also trying to figure out where all of these "one-line posts telling people they are wrong" are.  I don't even have that many posts on this forum.  And most of the ones I do have discuss what law school is actually like, the current job market, and the different alternatives out there to big law. 

Is it that hard to tell the difference between reality and hyperbole?  Do I really think that finance majors spend four years learning how to add and subtract using Excel?  Of course not.  They have to learn vlookup as well.
Well, you obviously have a bone to pick with people who majored in something that gave them skills that employers desire.  Just b/c you chose a different route does not mean you should pretend to understand what others do and then criticize it.

Also, I know plenty of people who did not major in business or something similar who found good jobs after college.  They worked their ass off, networked, met a lot of people, and finally had something come through.  It's not easy, but if you work hard enough at it, the jobs are out there.

EDIT: Saw your edit.  Again, I am not looking for a fight here.  All I am saying is that finance majors actually learn a lot of things beyond excel. 

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