Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.

Messages - UMHBmom

Pages: 1 2 3 4 [5]
41
Let me give you a head's up about the books:

You will get a long list of books you need for LARC, but this list is for all three quarters. For the first quarter, the only book you will need is the red "Legal Writing and Analysis". I may have just mangled that title, but it's the red paperback. You will need the rest for your second quarter, and you will NEVER need the "interactive workbook" because it is available in interactive form for free on Lexis Nexis (you'll get a password second quarter).

You will be tempted to buy every single study aid out there, and nothing I can say or do will keep you from doing it. Been there, done that. Just know that you will NEVER spend that much money on study aids again. And don't even bother getting study aids for Contracts. Prof. Contracts is very specific about how he wants things done, and a study aid will confuse you. What's more, he has purposefully chosen a textbook for which there are no study aids, i.e. canned briefs and outlines. In that class specifically, just pay attention in class and do your briefs his way. You will be sorry if you don't. He has been know to ask to see your diagrams. He is very big on diagrams. He has a different diagram for each and every section of the syllabus.

And lastly, a person plug for myself: I have a ton of study aids and textbooks for Contracts, Property, and Civ Pro. Send me a message if you still need anything. :)

42
Just a quick heads-up if you haven't bought a computer.

One thing you might want to consider is that the software that the law school uses for exams does NOT run on Mac OS, so you will either have to rent one of the 8 available laptops (they go fast, and aren't very reliable) or you will have to hand write your exams. Just another factor for your consideration. The professors "say" that they don't care about handwriting, but one of my classmates didn't even get half of his exam graded because of all the cross-outs and arrows and such. With MY writing, I wouldn't take the chance. FWIW.

Whoops, never mind... didn't realize Ellie had already said as much. Sorry. Carry on.  ;D

43
RELAX, EVERYBODY!!!

Good grief... so much drama.

 The passport photo: any digipic taken against a wall will do. Some people sent candid photos they cut down, one girl even sent a wallet from some Glamour Shots photo shoot. The chief purpose of the photo is so the staff can recognize you and so they can put you into the facebook so your classmates can recognize you.

The "optional fees": I paid for this the first quarter, dumped it after that. The gym is nice, but any local gym is cheaper. You'll get free access to games, but the time you will actually have to GO to games will make it cheaper to pay for tickets as the opportunity arises. The health clinic isn't worth the space in the building... unless it's your only option. I took the money for the fee and bought a good treadmill off of E-Bay, since I always seem to find the time run somewhere around midnight.

Parking: Yep, it really is optional. If you want to use the actual law school parking lot, you have to pay. However, there is a back lot that is free, and you can also park for free in St. Peter's (that's the parking garage with the steeples... crazy Baptists) across the street. The fact that most law students run around with three bags apiece suggests you might want to splurge for the parking sticker.

Health form: THAT really was a pain in the butt. In the end, I wound up having to get vaccinated all over again. Just get it over with. Some of my classmates have told me that they don't actually verify the records, though, so I suppose you can just scribble in a date and let that be that, if you choose.

Advanced lab fee: I really don't have a clue what this is, and as far as I can see I have unlimited access to any and all technology. You'll automatically be charged the mandatory tech fee, and that will get you everything you need: wireless internet, wireless printing, computer lab, Westlaw, Lexis Nexis, etc.

Deadline: rough estimate. If you're a few days late, it's really not a big thing.

Weekend commuting: A TON of students here do this. I live an hour away, so I feel like I'm right on the border of what constitutes practical daily commuting. One of my classmates does a daily commute from Dallas every day, another is a weekend commuter from Houston, and yet another is a quarter commuter from Oklahoma and only goes home on long weekends. I have to admit that there are times when I consider moving to Waco for the week. The cost of renting there is getting to be less than the amount I spend on gas every month, and I could be so much more efficient with my time if I didn't spend 15 hours a week in the car (I do carpool with two other girls, though... phew!). There are definitely advantages however way you choose to do it.

I hope this helps. It's really easy to freak out in the beginning, but just relax. Trust me... you have yet to encounter the things which justify a freak-out! Relax and enjoy the prospect of law school. The reality will set in soon enough.  ;)

44
Where should I go next fall? / Re: Baylor or Tulane????!?!?!?
« on: June 03, 2005, 03:11:24 PM »
UMHB hit the nail on the head, with the exception of her critique on Tulane.  Tulane does not teach civil law as a required course.  it is an elective and thus the law education you get there is essentially the same as the education that you get at any other law school.  i think Tulane's location bodes well for those interested in comparative law; I don't see it as a negative in any way, shape, or form. 



Whoops, my fault. I thought that Tulane by its very location would teach civilian law. I never meant to imply that that was a negative, simply a difference to consider. I stand corrected.

45
Where should I go next fall? / Re: Baylor or Tulane????!?!?!?
« on: June 02, 2005, 08:11:48 PM »
DO NOT GO TO BAYLOR!!! 

UT, SMU, and UH law schools teach you how to think like a lawyer.  Baylor Law is, essentially, a THREE-YEAR BAR PREP COURSE.  Baylor Law does not focus on teaching you think like a lawyer; instead, it focuses on teaching you TEXAS BLACK LETTER LAW.  This is not an advantage, even if you want to practice in Texas.  This can be proven by the fact that many Texas law firms choose SMU and UH grads over Baylor grads ALL OF THE TIME. 

Although you mentioned you wanted to practice in Texas, Baylor does not dominate any Texas town.  In the Austin area, UT Law dominates, as it does throughout Texas.  In the DFW area, SMU Law dominates.  And, in Houston, UHLC and South Texas dominate.  Surprising?  South Texas has a GREAT reputation in Houston; a better rep. than Baylor. 

BOTTOM LINE: Tulane will teach you to think like a lawyer and will give you the same opportunities, as Baylor will, to practice in Texas.  CHOOSE TULANE.


It's clear that this poster has no idea what law school is all about. For one thing, the notion that one can pass the Bar and not "think like a lawyer" is ridiculous. At no level of law education is it sufficient to memorize "the rules" by rote and then spit them back out again. If you are to "think like a lawyer", you must know those rules like the back of your hand,AND you must be able to fit the rules to the facts. When this poster criticizes the teaching of "black letter law", the poster exposes a common ignorance: that there are two separate laws, one on some higher, theoretical plane, and one written in the books. Perhaps if this poster looked in the books, he would be astounded to find that the books do not contain THE LAW. The books contain the cases that espouse the theories of the law! Yes, there is codified law based on state and federal statutes, but as far as "the game" of law is played, it's all about the theory, baby, and who can make the most creative use of it. There is no such thing as a "theoretical" school and a "black letter" school. There is no such thing as a school that prepares you for the Bar yet somehow fails to prepare you as a lawyer. I don't mean to be unkind, but I am a very tired Baylor student and simply wish to suggest to the poster that he/she/it might want to avoid Baylor like the plague because it appears to me that perhaps the poster's only true complaint is that it was the toughest. Wah.

Facts:

Baylor has the second-highest number of firms that do on campus interviews in the state, second only to UT. UT is the largest law school, Baylor is the smallest.

If it appears that there are more lawyers from all of the other schools, you would be correct. We're the smallest. Fewer graduates. So the fact that firms hire more UT, UH, and SMU grads is a no-brainer. There's more of them out there! It's just elementary math.

Baylor has the greatest number of interview requests from firms outside of the state of Texas... and this includes UT. Surprise!

And a PS about Tulane: It's a good school, but there's one major, major, major problem: Louisiana is the ONLY state in the entire US to work under the Napoleonic Code. This is NOT a bad thing, but it does mean that you will have to do some serious Bar review in another state if you want to work outside of Louisiana. The theoretical differences are relatively minor, but the procedural differences (and you might think that's no big deal until you take classes in procedure!) are HUGE. Here's info: http://www.la-legal.com/history_louisiana_law.htm. Ironically, because it's civilian law, LA is the only state in the union that uses nothing but... you guessed it... BLACK LETTER LAW. :) You'll learn the common law way, too, simply because the federal system in the state is uniform with the rest of the country.
Good luck choosing!

Pages: 1 2 3 4 [5]