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Messages - davidatfsu

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61
My basic question is why take the risk of potentially not having a job or teh job you want, by going to a crappy school? Isnt the risk of waiting a year and redoing your LSAT a better one.

No, for some folks, studying the LSAT for another year won't improve their scores significantly, much less enough to get into a top 20. My buddy took a year off school to strictly study LSAT. He had a 4.0, but couldn't get his damn score over 149. But he wanted to go to law school, so he settled on getting some money to go to Coastal. Coastal grads have jobs. What's wrong with that?

Second, graduating from the top 20 doesn't guarantee anyone the job they want. Like one of the 4th tier posters said, not everyone wants Big Law. I bet there are plenty of 4th tier grads who are a lot happier with their jobs than HLS or Yale grads.

62
Judge Judy went to NYLS and look at her AL!!!!!!

Awesome, awesome point.  :D

63
Other than your point about trying to start your own firm, I have to disagree with everything you said.

It's not hard to find a job when you go to a sub 20 law school. It can be hard to find a job you want, however. I'm going to Samford, which is definitely a regional school, but it is a well-respected one around here. My aunt works for the Cochran firm in Atlanta doing med mal, graduated from Vanderbilt cum laude, moot court national champion, and has two masters degrees. She works alongside a couple Samford grads. Those grads are probably law review editors and/or at the top of their class, as Cochran's firm is rather prestigious. But lots of Samford grads get good firm jobs in Atlanta and Birmingham.

If your standards are to litigate cases for big tobacco or sit on the Supreme Court, then yes, you're probably wasting your time at a 2-4th tier. But, frankly, I think it's silly to say that it's a waste to go to one and that you can't find a job you like doing.

But no doubt, there are plenty of people who graduate with law degrees, not realizing what kind of career they were getting themselves into. That happens to Harvard grads though.

64
Studying for the LSAT / Re: Is cancelling that big of a deal?
« on: May 20, 2005, 01:09:25 PM »
I'm probably 75% to cancel this test... gonna sit through it anyway... for me the only section that gives me trouble is games so if this happens to be an easy games section, or one that clicks, ill keep the score

Glad you finally came to a decision. Hope we were some help. I'll only reiterate what I said before: you can't have a very educated assessment of your performance until you get your scores. Maybe some of the games will seem easy because you miss a key part of the hypo or something. I say if you know you're unprepared, don't put yourself through it.

But good luck anyway!  :)

65
Studying for the LSAT / Re: Is cancelling that big of a deal?
« on: May 20, 2005, 08:15:06 AM »
I don't think anyone really notices, much less cares. There could be a million legitimate reasons for why one would cancel their scores.

On the other hand, IMO, if you feel like there's a 50/50 chance you'll cancel, you probably will. So don't waste your time or stress on it. Take it in October and be confident about it.

66
Acceptances / Re: Who's still in at NOWHERE??!!
« on: May 20, 2005, 08:09:52 AM »
I'm contemplated sending a 3rd LOR. You guys think it's a good idea? Should I call and ask first?

I definitely wouldn't waste my time using LSAC this time around. I'd call admissions and see what they say. If you can determine one of the professors on the admissions committee, I'd send one personally to him or her. Can't hurt to try at least.

67
Black Law Student Discussion Board / Re: what is black culture?
« on: May 19, 2005, 04:55:19 PM »
There are a hell of a lot more poor whites in this country than corporate (rich) whites. Are poor whites a part of “white culture” if they are not involved with corporate America? 

Of course! There's more of them and that's been my point from the beginning! They dream of living the life of corporate (rich) whites. They're just unsuccessful. The influence is still there. And that influence is a lot stronger than everything that was mentioned before as black culture.

68
Black Law Student Discussion Board / Re: what is black culture?
« on: May 19, 2005, 04:51:48 PM »
Elvis certainly copied Bessie Smith but that's a history lesson for another day..


you see david..that statement you made about corporate culture being white culture.. is exactly what pissed me off in the latino thread a few weeks ago..

i'm tired of people adopting the mentality that just because some white people are in more powerful positions that some black people..that that means that the culture is white..

since the CEO of American Express is black does that make American Express a black credit card?

Music's a huge part of my life, and like I said before, you won't catch me denying the influence of black culture there.

My response to your objection of people's mentality is that minority CEOs played the game and beat the odds. Guys like Colin Powell or the CEO of American Express wouldn't have given a *&^% about spending hard earned money on rims because they knew that would never get them anywhere.

69
Black Law Student Discussion Board / Re: what is black culture?
« on: May 19, 2005, 04:36:32 PM »
Saying "on the other hand" means nothing. Your original statement was a contradiction but that's ok. You have to be more specific when you post messages. You have to say "In corporate America, mainstream culture is white culture" However, I would still take issue with that. Let me ask you this: What do you mean by saying that corporate culture is white culture? Isn't it American culture? Give me something specific regarding "white culture" that is so corporate.



“But your culture is outside of the mainstream. That's because it's a minority culture. There's nothing racist about that. On the other hand hip-hop and R&B dominate rock music right now 10 to 1 with kids. Take a look at the billboard top 10 and see how many are rock or country vs how many are rap and R&B.”

Is this not a contradiction?


Like I said, "on the other hand". But that's only with youth culture. There's no denying that rap culture, which is generally associated with black culture, is prevalent with the MTV generation. But in the grand scheme of the United States, white culture clearly dominates. Corporate America, which is generally associated with white culture, is the culture that rules the day. And my point is that that has less to do with hostility towards black culture and more to do with the sheer number of people behind it.

I'm not sure what statement you think was a contradiction. That black culture is outside of the mainstream because it's the minority? You disagree, but that doesn't make it a contradiction. Unless I'm pointing to the wrong statement.

Maybe we're confusing too many "cultures" here that probably overlap a lot. Let's put aside the influence in the youth for a moment... I won't deny for a second that the Rolling Stones would not exist without the influence of black music (gospel, jazz, etc.) But I wouldn't say the Rolling Stones are part of black culture. I've been to a Rolling Stones concert, and I could count on my hand how many black people were there. So I guess my point is that historical influence is one thing; mainstream presence or domination is another.

And what dominates American culture is money as controlled by corporations. Take 10 CEOs and ask them about what influences and excites them outside of making money. You'd hear yachting, Bill Gates, Adam Smith, golf... That's their culture. Move further down the ladder and you'd see that most whites working in cubicles all day for those CEOs are wishing for lives influenced by those things. So in that sense, nothing really distinguishes white culture from corporate America.

Here's where I'll probably get flamed, and you can make all the assumptions you want to about me.

Between the average 18 year old white kid and the average 18 year old black kid, the goals are the same: happiness, security, etc. But the means to those goals are looked at differently in white and black culture. To the white kid it's get good grades, go to a good college, get a good job, get a good house, have good kids and grandkids because that's the game you play for "success" in America. Most black kids aren't afforded the opportunities to play the game in order to be successful (again, I use that term loosely). Not only that, gangster rap only encourages black kids not to play the game.

Honestly, I don't know what the hell we were even discussing to begin with. I think I'm through with uber-intense debate through the bulletin board. This would be a much more interesting and lucid discussion if we were all in person. I think everyone would agree with that.

70
Black Law Student Discussion Board / Re: what is black culture?
« on: May 19, 2005, 04:01:36 PM »
“But your culture is outside of the mainstream. That's because it's a minority culture. There's nothing racist about that. On the other hand hip-hop and R&B dominate rock music right now 10 to 1 with kids. Take a look at the billboard top 10 and see how many are rock or country vs how many are rap and R&B.”

Is this not a contradiction?


Like I said, "on the other hand". But that's only with youth culture. There's no denying that rap culture, which is generally associated with black culture, is prevalent with the MTV generation. But in the grand scheme of the United States, white culture clearly dominates. Corporate America, which is generally associated with white culture, is the culture that rules the day. And my point is that that has less to do with hostility towards black culture and more to do with the sheer number of people behind it.

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