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Messages - LittleRussianPrincess, Esq.

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81
1. I'm reinterviewing because last year's OCI was an utter failure (got lots of interviews but no offers) so I ended up working for a federal agency instead of a firm.



2. The firm that asked for the transcript was in the San Francisco area. My school is in the DC area so it's not exactly a feeder school, but I have heard of quite a few classmates who received offers in that region.

3. My summer job was at a federal agency in DC.

In sum, my prospects are grim and I'm very hungry for a job.

You're right; that could be tough. Have you spoken with the career services folks at your school?

82
Black Law Students / Re: Memoirs of a Bar Examinee
« on: July 30, 2008, 12:59:21 PM »
So one of my homegirls is taking the NY bar exam as we speak, told me yesterday that when she came back from the lunch break there was one student with his head laid down on his desk napping hard.  The exam starts, this guy is still napping.

She looks over halfway through - still napping.

The gets up to leave just before they call time, this guy is STILL NAPPING!  The proctors never even so much as touched the guy.  They gathered around him at one point, but nobody nudged him to say "hey, guy, you know there's a bar exam going on right now right?"

Wow.  Just wow.

Seems crazy. Maybe the guy was sick. I can't believe they didn't check on him.

As someone who passes out relatively frequently (low blood sugar), I don't find stories like this comforting!

Yeah that's crazy. I'd be madder than two mafuckas.  But then again, I can't sleep when I know that I have to get up for something serious.  My body won't let me - I'll keep waking up every 5 minutes for no reason. 

The night before the bar exam I threw in a movie and tried to relax b/c I usually fall asleep to the TV being on.  No chance!  Stayed up through the whole damn thing like a kid on Christmas Eve.

Right, which is what makes me think there may have been something wrong with this dude.

83
Black Law Students / Re: Memoirs of a Bar Examinee
« on: July 30, 2008, 10:07:02 AM »
So one of my homegirls is taking the NY bar exam as we speak, told me yesterday that when she came back from the lunch break there was one student with his head laid down on his desk napping hard.  The exam starts, this guy is still napping.

She looks over halfway through - still napping.

The gets up to leave just before they call time, this guy is STILL NAPPING!  The proctors never even so much as touched the guy.  They gathered around him at one point, but nobody nudged him to say "hey, guy, you know there's a bar exam going on right now right?"

Wow.  Just wow.

Seems crazy. Maybe the guy was sick. I can't believe they didn't check on him.

As someone who passes out relatively frequently (low blood sugar), I don't find stories like this comforting!

84
Incoming 1Ls / Re: Working overseas
« on: July 30, 2008, 07:29:26 AM »
Generally, these positions (entry level )are much easier to get if you're at a top 20 or so school. You can also get in if you start out at an American firm with a foreign office. There are usually programs that send associates overseas for a couple years.
Could you provide a little more info on this?  Do you apply to the NY offices for SA and then express interest in the program during that summer or do you express interest in the initial interviews or.....?

And British Sandos really are that bad.  Though have taken a liking to cheese and pickle.
I don't know many specifics, because I applied as a 3L to a British firm with no American offices, so my experience is completely different. I know that Latham asked a bunch of people in the class of 07 who had summered at American offices whether they'd be willing to go to London for a couple years. Sadly, they don't have any work now, so it is probably not something they will try again anytime soon.

85
Black Law Students / Re: Life As An Associate
« on: July 30, 2008, 03:53:59 AM »
Hey y'all, is anyone on here applying to the GA Bar? Need to get all my stuff together but I heard the process is an 8-month-long mess. True?

Only takes about 12 weeks once they get it. Watch out for deadlines though. They are a lot different than most other jurisdictions. Example: Normal deadline for the July exam is early December.

But...they have a "late deadline" that goes until March. I think they just want more money.

Thanks. I am hoping to take it in Feb, but I don't know if I will get everything together by then. I've got the fingerprint cards, but getting the actual fingerprints might be a challenge with me being in London. Florida was going to let me do mine at the Embassy or at any UK police station, but I think GA is more strict. I was hoping to at least be able to say that I am registered to take the GA Bar when I apply for ATL jobs. We'll see if that works out for me.

86
Incoming 1Ls / Re: Working overseas
« on: July 30, 2008, 03:49:28 AM »
ah I never used toptable. The restaurants always seemed weird. That's funny, I used to work right in Tower Hill so not too far away. I love the Borough market area though I wouldn't say the food there is cheap. That's fine though. I saved on rent to splurge on food. Hate English sandwiches though. They are always the worst/most bizarre combinations in the world. Prawns and cress. bleurgh. The Magdalen is right around that London Bridge area and they have great food though I never made it there. Ah and you're right by The Rake as well! Lucky lady! I love it there.

Yeah, it depends on your budget and whether you are converting to dollars all the time. A $7 dollar lunch doesn't seem bad on its face, but when it's 7 and you're doubling it to convert to dollars, it makes your head spin to think you're paying that much for a sandwich and a bag of chips. One of the things you have to get used to here is not converting; otherwise you simply go insane.

Don't really know what top table was like when you were here, but at least now they have some awesome restaurants on the list: Asia de Cuba, the Landau, a couple of Gordon Ramsey cafes, lots of top hotel restaurants. It's my goal to eat my way around to city so I try to go once a week.

Yeah, English sandwiches are totally gross. Marmalade and stilton, egg and watercress, and more similarly yucky stuff. We have a sandwich bar downstairs in the office and every time I order a tuna sandwich and ask for mayo on it they look at me like I am insane, ask me why I don't want "buttah" and remind me that there's already mayo in the tuna salad (even though there's barely any in the British version).  At work, especially on busy days when I can't leave the office to eat, I've learned to eat for sustenance rather than for pleasure.

87
Incoming 1Ls / Re: Working overseas
« on: July 29, 2008, 04:54:49 PM »
Borough market is just around the coener from my office so I go there frequently. As far as cheap dining in London goes, it doesn't get much better than Borough market. As you probably know, there are few casual dining/inexpensive places where the food is good. It's mostly greasy pub food and weird sandwiches. The high end dining is excellent--some of the best French food in the world--but it is really pricy. A dinner at a good restaurant is easily 50 pounds pp. I have managed to save a lot of money on toptable.com which has great weekly specials and promotions.

88
American, Catholic, GMU.

89
Incoming 1Ls / Re: Working overseas
« on: July 29, 2008, 02:36:49 PM »
I don't think I can contribute much more than LittleRussianPrincess has, but the easiest market to break into in London is, from my research and understanding, through an American firm in the City. That's sort of my dream situation and would love to do the Columbia JD/LLM program. As for paying off your bills in a better currency...I think that's debatable. You're going to have about 22 - 25% income tax (I was earning a lot less than a lawyer would when I was there and my income tax amounted to about 22%) and you're going to be paying about Manhattan prices in terms of cost of living for a flat and transport unless you don't mind living in a flatshare or perhaps travelling a bit further out. Plus going to the pub, eating out, etc. I had really cheap rent when I was living in London, but my landlord was a bit crap and our house (though in a nice area) was full of junk. That said, I loved living there and had a decent amount of expendable income so it's definately do-able.

nikos - no I don't think it's that easy. Again, from what I understand, most American attorney's are working in capital markets and the financial industry and that's it. A couple years ago the UK opened up for American law firms to work there with American-UK corporate law, and that created a proliferation of American firms or firms with American divisions. Thats quite general, but I think that's sort of how it happened/works.

Anzian - if I were you, I would get a job in London and then get a second home in Italy. It's quite common for many Brits to have a home abroad that they let when they aren't there, and that would be a way for you to keep a home there and live part of the year there but you don't have to deal with the infrastructure of corporate Italy.

Yes, London is indeed quite expensive, but with even the worst expat package, your take home pay is more than it is in NY. Cost of living is comparable to NYC, so the stronger currency is definitely an advantage. I put away about 2k/month here, despite having a ridiculously expensive apartment in Chelsea. I eat out frequently and go out on the weekends, so I'm not exactly penny pinching.

90
Incoming 1Ls / Re: Working overseas
« on: July 29, 2008, 10:57:36 AM »
Sorry it's taken me so long to reply. If you're still interested, here's my insight.

I graduated in May 07 and started as an associate at a British firm in London in October of the same year. Tennessee is my undergrad; I went to Berkeley for law school.

I can tell you that getting to Italy is much tougher than getting to London, more or less because it's a numbers game. London is the largest, most active financial market in the world right now so many foreign firms have large offices here. Things aren't as lively in Milan or Rome, so Italian offices of American or British firms tend to be quite small. They do tend to have and want US lawyers there, but it's a tough gig to get. I have a co-worker who is a double Stanford grad who wanted to go to Italy and had to settle for London. She's fluent in Italian and is a URM. She interviewed with a number of firms, but no luck, especially in this market.

You should also know that taking a job in Italy is probably going to lead to a pay cut. They don't tend to do expat packages there, nor do they do currency exchange protection (that I know of), which you definitely need when the firm is paying you in euros but your salary is set in USD. The financial packages are much, much better in London.

I hope this is somewhat helpful. Let me know if you have additional questions.

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