Law School Discussion

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Messages - sno

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61
here's the thing...even if he decides on biglaw, t1 doesn't automatically = biglaw...u have to do well too...additionally, as i mentioned earlier (in this post i think), you may change your mind about what field you want to work in, but you probably won't suddenly decide you want to work 70 hours a week...and between having little debt and having to rely on LRAP, i'll take little debt any day...if you know you're staying in a certain area and aren't interested in biglaw, take the money and run...rankings typically don't mean as much to a small market where most of the attorneys went to local schools...

62
Law School Applications / Re: Should I disclose speeding tickets?
« on: June 28, 2007, 05:29:53 PM »
I have a hard time believing C&F would care at all if you failed to put on your LS app that you had a few speeding tickets.

If they brought it up, you could just tell them that you did not think they were considtered criminal offenses at the time.

it's not the violation that's going to be an issue...it's covering it up that may be...true u can claim you didn't know it was a criminal offense...at best they believe you and think you're stupid and admit you to the bar...at worst they think you're lying and still trying to cover it up and don't admit you...better bet, don't bother lying...it's so unlikely to affect your admission to the bar, but lying about it may...e.g. Attorney Grievance Comm'n v. Myers, 635 A.2d 1315 (Md. 1994), the attorney was disbarred for lying on his bar application about traffic tickets even though the tickets themselves wouldn't have justified denial of admission...lesson? just disclose it, if not disclosing is going to bite you on the ass, you probably won't know until you've already spent $150k and 3 years of your life

63
don't worry about it...it's a civil matter and i've yet to see an application package asking you to disclose civil matters...only worry about it if you end up getting charged with a hit and run or something

64
The less prestigious degree and the big debt load both do the same thing: they reduce the number of opportunities you have.  Both close some doors, while the lack of debt or the prestigious degree open a lot of other ones.  Law students just need to be cognizant of that.  I think a lot of people have preconceived notions about this, and don't recognize that it's always going to be a trade off.

excellent post

65
The less prestigious degree and the big debt load both do the same thing: they reduce the number of opportunities you have.  Both close some doors, while the lack of debt or the prestigious degree open a lot of other ones.  Law students just need to be cognizant of that.  I think a lot of people have preconceived notions about this, and don't recognize that it's always going to be a trade off.

In that case, I'm very lucky to have received my biggest scholarship from my best acceptance in my region of the country. In any event, as someone once put it on this site or another; if you choose the school with more prestige you'll be kicking yourself for the next ten years every time you write out that check for the student loans but if you choose the lesser school, you'll be kicking yourself for the rest of your life for passing up an excellent opportunity. I'm not saying that this will always occur but it most likely will and it does seem worthwhile to sacrifice ten years of pay for a lifetime of rewards. Right now you may be thinking about saving a few thousand dollars over the next three years but over the life of your career you're going to lose money if you attend that T3. You stated yourself that this T1 in another state does well in your state. Why do you think that's the case? It's probably not because the T3 in your state isn't producing enough attorneys. Think on that.

actually, imo, what school you go to really only affects your income for your first job or 2...you can come from harvard but if you don't win a single case before you take on subsequent jobs, you'll probably have a hard time getting these subsequent jobs...if you win most of your cases and you went to cooley, you'll likely have an easier time getting subsequent jobs than the guy who went to harvard that can't win a case if their life depended on it...after the first couple of jobs, work experience is probably a lot more important than where you went to school...remember, even TJ grads become judges...

66
Law School Applications / Re: Should I disclose speeding tickets?
« on: June 28, 2007, 03:00:49 AM »

I think he was joking buddy  ;D ...and your reasoning is a bit flawed there.  As for the original question, I would ask the admissions office anonymously, and do whatever they say.

really? where's the flaw? i mean, i can see it's sort of a jumping to conclusions thing...but i didn't mean it in a it has zero effect kinda thing...i meant his whole 10 mph over the limit = cooley is blowing it out of proportions...but yea, now that i read that post again, i think u're right...sarcasm doesn't transfer well when being read  :P :D

67
i think everything you said is accurate...except where you assume doing well at a T3 = transferring to a T1...

honestly, i think most people have an aversion to biglaw because of the hours...normally, i say say don't assume you know what you want to do before you go to law school...but i think it's different with people who don't think they want to do biglaw...i mean, i fail to see how any amount of schooling will suddenly make you willing/want to work 70 hours a week...assuming that's why you didn't want biglaw in the first place...

in your case, if you're certain you want to be in the state and don't want biglaw, then go ahead and take the money...just my .02

68
Law School Applications / Re: Should I disclose speeding tickets?
« on: June 28, 2007, 12:06:13 AM »
I don't know why everyone is saying that speeding tickets don't matter. 

I have a friend who had a 10 mph speeding ticket.  He had a 167 LSAT, 3.6 GPA, and was the President of three different campus organizations.  Anyway the best school he was accepted to was Cooley.  He thought he had a chance at a decent T1 school... so that's all he applied to but had Cooley as a safety.  He asked the law school at our university why he was rejected everywhere else and they said that if the speeding ticket is 10 miles per hour or more that law schools take that very seriously because it is so reckless. 

So hopefully you didn't speed more than 10 mph... if you did (no offense or anything) but I would get your Cooley application ready.

soooooooooooooooooooooo no true...i was cited (and found guilty...i pled not guilty..shoulda seen the judge's face when i said "not guilty") for a ticket years ago for "speeding over 100 mph" (111 to be exact)...a lot of the schools i disclosed it to (since i was supposed to) not only offered me admission, but a scholarship along with the admission...so, if true, your friend's either lying to you about their numbers or they have something far worse on their apps that you weren't told about...oh, and it was a 70 zone (tho at 111, i don't think that matters)

69
Law School Applications / Re: Should I disclose speeding tickets?
« on: June 27, 2007, 02:18:57 PM »
if there's a law that says "you can't do x" and the remedy is not through another individual (e.g. civil), then it's a crime...if you can be fined where the organization that benefits is the government or if you can be jailed, then it is a crime. it may be an infraction, but that's a crime nonetheless...as far as disclosure, if you don't think the school asks for it (namely, they say "disclose any crime except for minor traffic offenses" or something) then don't bother disclosing it, but if they just ask for you to disclose any crime, then you might as well disclose it...a traffic ticket won't affect your admission, but not disclosing may (though i believe unlikely) affect your admission to the bar later

70
go to pepperdine...their jump in the rankings really doesn't mean anything, but loyola is not $25k a year better than pepperdine...what counts, no matter the rank, is the rep of the school and how easily you can get a job out of there...t14, yes, they're ranked high, but why do you think that is? because of their rep which ultimately leads to an easier time getting a job out of them...yes, pepperdine is "ranked" the same as loyola, but loyola has a better rep...i just don't think their rep is so much better that it's worth passing up on potentially $75k (i'm assuming renewable and that you can hold on to it)

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