Law School Discussion

Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - Maclock

Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 [6] 7 8 9 10
51
Acceptances, Denials, and Waitlists / Re: Northwestern Waitlist
« on: June 27, 2005, 07:53:08 PM »
For those of you admitted off the waitlist at Northwestern over the course of the last few days, may I inquire:

(1) when you were put on the waitlist; and

(2) if you were asked in recent weeks whether you would like to be placed on a shortened summer waitlist.

I was waitlisted on April 12th (I applied relatively late in the cycle and didn't write my LSAT until February) and have received no other communications since that date, so I'm just trying to gauge what steps others on the waitlist have gone through over the past few months.  I have yet to receive an unequivocal "no" by letter from the admissions office, so I'm not entirely certain if the door has been shut.  (Does Northwestern send out such letters denying admission after you have been waitlisted?)

Congrats again to all recent admits; you are a source of inspiration and hope to those of us who might yet be accepted by Northwestern!

Many thanks,
M.

52
Acceptances, Denials, and Waitlists / Re: Northwestern Waitlist
« on: June 27, 2005, 04:22:15 PM »
Got an email from Johann Lee today and I am in!!

I am super excited.  Between family and friends in the area and the quality of the school, I can't really beat it.

BTW- It sounded like the waitlist would be moving.

Congrats!  That's excellent news!

M.

54
Acceptances, Denials, and Waitlists / Re: Northwestern Waitlist
« on: June 27, 2005, 12:53:30 PM »
Bump.

55

It might appear on the surface that the Rutgers degree does not travel very well. But I think in reality, the graduates are not interested in traveling outside of the NYC, NJ,Philly, DC area. If you are in close proximity to some of the largest legal markets, why try to transport your degree cross coast to the Midwest or the west coast? I think the locality of Rutgers graduates may be a reflection of personal choice and not a reflection of a lack of name recognition.
Quote

I had, of course, thought about that, too, and further thought that the dispersion of Miami grads across the country might have more to do with large classes of graduates being pumped out of Miami and a soft/saturated local legal market not being able to handle all of the grads from the University of Miami than with a Miami degree travelling better.  After all, people need to work!  All these suppositions, however, may not be vaild at all, and so I come in search of the truth.  Does anyone know how well these degrees will travel?

And I know that there are some wonderful legal markets in the North-east, but having grown up in a snowy wasteland, I would like to take my J.D. somewhere sunny, warm, safe and prosperous!   ;)

Many thanks for your reply, though!  As noted, I had thought something similar, but would like to know how a J.D. from Rutgers is actually received outside of the North-east (as opposed to reasons why Rutgers grads are not well-represented on the West Coast, for example).  Please excuse me if this sounds "chippy"; that's not my intention at all.  The Internet is a lousy means of communicating subtlety, nuance, etc.

Anecdotal evidence seemed to indicate that Miami grads end up working in better firms in large markets far removed from Miami. This may have more to do with the fact that Rutgers grads, to the extent that they want to work in fancy firms, stay in their own backyard, though.

All the best,
M.

I am not being chippy either. My intentions were clear:

You provided information from Martindale as evidence for your speculation that the Rutgers name may not travel well outside of the east coast. I am pointing out that your analysis of that information is off. There is a better, more FACTUAL interpretation of that data:

-A large portion of RU students come from jersey (a state school) and the surrounding areas. So they decide to stay in Jersey or in the surrounding areas.

-The largest legal markets are in RU's backyard. So many of them decide to stay in the surrounding areas.

So, in other words, you can not use Martindale to draw conclusions about national name recognition. Because there are many variables that determine where graduates of a certain law school decide to live and practice. In this case, name recognition is less likely to be the driving force behind this trend.


Many thanks for your reply. 

There's no need to shout or to become defensive.  I am not challenging whether Rutgers is a good school; I just want to get an idea of whether the degree travels well for those who are not at the top of their class and who want to work outside of the North-east.  Your first post was genuinely insightful, and I was merely remarking how I had thought some similar things.  I was not at any time implying that you were being chippy.

By the way, your so-called "...better, more FACTUAL interpretation of that data..." about Rutgers is just as much supposition as my ruminations about Miami, so relax a little, will ya?  How many Rutgers grads become trapped in the region and are forced to work there because they cannot relocate, even if they wanted to?  I have seen how degrees from certain law schools will not easily allow one to work outside of certain markets, no matter how good or unique one's experience may be.  (Remember, I actually hold a law degree and have some experience with these types of things.)

Your interest in this topic is most welcome, however.

All the best,
M.

56
A lot of Yankees go down to Miami for school so it is only natural that quite a few of them find their way back up north.

Actually, I looked at TX and CA as I want warmth and a chance to practice oil and gas law, if I can get it.  I also checked AK and CO, but that was because of the opportunity to practice oil and gas law and not for warmth, obviously!

As I said, I just did a Martindale-Hubbell search and was surprised to see that a Miami degree seemed to travel further and to better firms.  (Not that many Miami grads are working in oil and gas, mind you.)  I may be deluding myself here, as perhaps Rutgers-Newark and Kansas simply attract more local boys and girls who don't want to move too far from home.

Thanks for your reply,
M.

57

It might appear on the surface that the Rutgers degree does not travel very well. But I think in reality, the graduates are not interested in traveling outside of the NYC, NJ,Philly, DC area. If you are in close proximity to some of the largest legal markets, why try to transport your degree cross coast to the Midwest or the west coast? I think the locality of Rutgers graduates may be a reflection of personal choice and not a reflection of a lack of name recognition.
Quote

I had, of course, thought about that, too, and further thought that the dispersion of Miami grads across the country might have more to do with large classes of graduates being pumped out of Miami and a soft/saturated local legal market not being able to handle all of the grads from the University of Miami than with a Miami degree travelling better.  After all, people need to work!  All these suppositions, however, may not be vaild at all, and so I come in search of the truth.  Does anyone know how well these degrees will travel?

And I know that there are some wonderful legal markets in the North-east, but having grown up in a snowy wasteland, I would like to take my J.D. somewhere sunny, warm, safe and prosperous!   ;)

Many thanks for your reply, though!  As noted, I had thought something similar, but would like to know how a J.D. from Rutgers is actually received outside of the North-east (as opposed to reasons why Rutgers grads are not well-represented on the West Coast, for example).  Please excuse me if this sounds "chippy"; that's not my intention at all.  The Internet is a lousy means of communicating subtlety, nuance, etc.

Anecdotal evidence seemed to indicate that Miami grads end up working in better firms in large markets far removed from Miami. This may have more to do with the fact that Rutgers grads, to the extent that they want to work in fancy firms, stay in their own backyard, though.

All the best,
M.

58
Unfortunately, none of the schools you have listed really travel all that well nationally.  Of the three you listed, Miami and Rutgers may carry the best, but to expect anything outside of the usual catchment area is wishful thinking

I agree with the poster above.  One difference that might be beneficial to you though as a foreign student is the proximity of Rutgers to NYC.  NYC firms do recruit at Rutgers, and that type of work experience might help your degree travel a bit farther a few years down the road.

Of course, you probably need to be top 20% at Rutgers to get a good NYC gig.

C2

Thanks for your thoughts.

Top 20% at Rutgers-Newark for NYC, huh?  Wow.  Based on my own experience in law school abroad, I can tell ya that this can be quite difficult.

Rgds.,
M.

59
Unfortunately, none of the schools you have listed really travel all that well nationally.  Of the three you listed, Miami and Rutgers may carry the best, but to expect anything outside of the usual catchment area is wishful thinking

Many thanks for your reply. 

I looked into the matter myself using Martindale-Hubbell and was somewhat surprised to see that a degree from Miami seems to travel better than a degree from either Rutgers or Kansas.  I was of the impression that both Rutgers and Kansas were, historically speaking, thought to be better schools.  [The plunge of Kansas in the USN&WR rankings has more to do with incomplete data regarding placement rates, salaries, etc., than anything to do with the quality of the school itself.  It was, until recently, somewhere in the mid-60s (or maybe the mid-70s), I believe, and has now plunged overnight to 100.  Nothing short of a data screw-up can explain such a precipitous drop.]

I fear that you may be right, however; making any of these degrees fly outside of the catchment areas for these schools could well be a difficult task.

M.

60
Having pretty much been told that I will not be getting in off the waitlist at Northwestern, I must now try to decide amongst Kansas, the University of Miami and Rutgers-Newark. I have been accepted at Kansas and am trying to get in off the waitlists at Miami and Rutgers-Newark. (I have also been accepted at Southwestern, but the universally negative things that I have heard about that place have put me off attending.)

I am a graduate of a foreign law school and deliberately focused my applications on places that will give me one year of advance standing for my LL.B. This is why the collection of schools mentioned in this posting is, well, eclectic, to say the least.

While I would have had no worries about how well a degree from Northwestern would travel, I know that I will have to rock it out from the other schools that I am now forced to contemplate to assure that my J.D. will be well-received across the States. Having already completed one law degree, I can assure you that finishing in the top 10-20% of one's class is no simple feat! All things being equal, assuming that I finish in the top-third to top-half of my class at any of these schools, which degree will travel best?

Many thanks for your replies!

M.

Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 [6] 7 8 9 10