Law School Discussion

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Messages - Maclock

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21
And how I like me some Colorado!  What a wonderful state.

Thank you for your reply.  I'll see what DU thinks about my idea in the next few days, I should hope.

22
Yale, then Harvard and Stanford.  Oil and Gas practice is no different than any other practice.  Big Texas (and NY, Chi, Cali) firms handle the transactional work and Big DC firms handle a lot of the regulatory work. 

I am inclined to disagree.  Oil and gas firms/companies like industry-specific coursework if you are really going to be an oil and gas specialist.  It does make a difference.

Thank you very much for your replies, though!

23
Thank you for your reply, Matthies. 

Do you know if exploration and production companies actively interview on-campus?

Best,
Maclock

Houston has an excellent oil and gas program, but you said they were out for some reason. Firms that do oil and gas do OCI on campus at Denver. I know two people who got jobs in the oil and gas department of a large local firm from OCI at Denver. As to actual oil and gas companies doing on campus interviewing, not that I know of. In-house positions donít usually hire from OCI (at any school). OCI is usually used mostly by firms and organizations that need time hire several new employees, it does not make sense for companies or organizations that only need 1 or 2 people.  There is a section of the CO bar association for oil and gas law, and I think they have lunches once a month. You can join as a student member, that would be the best place to meet people who might have oil and gas jobs for you.

Yeah, Houston is out only because I hope to get advance standing for the LL.B. that I hold in another common law country and skip the first-year curriculum in its entirety.  Houston would require me to repeat the entire first-year curriculum (not something I am keen to do as it is tedious, a waste of valuable elective time, and a waste of my money) before deciding if they will give me any advance standing at all.  In the end, they may decide to give me little or no credit despite my previous legal study.  Their approach might make sense if I were coming from a civil law system, but I'm not; I'm coming from a major Western country that follows the common law tradition.  It's too bad, really, because I'd love to attend Houston.

The University of Kansas would allow me to skip the first-year curriculum and proceed to upper-level courses, and it is an excellent law school, but ultimately its appeal is regional.  On top of having limited oil and gas coursework to follow, it might be difficult to market a Kansas degree in Houston or Denver.

As I'm already working in-house, but in a foreign country, it would be nice if I could get my foot in the door at an exploration and production company in the United States without having to pay my "private practice dues" a second time.

Thank you for your continued interest, Matthies!

24
Looks like UT has a dedicated journal for oil and energy law, so I would say that's a safe bet. http://www.tjogel.org/

And I'd love to attend UT, but I'm not certain that I'll be able to get there.  That's why I'd like to know more about less-obvious choices.

You're right, though: UT leads the pack.

Thank you for your reply!  Keep 'em coming, guys!

25
Thank you for your reply, Matthies. 

Do you know if exploration and production companies actively interview on-campus?

Best,
Maclock

26
Hello there, folks.  If one wished to specialize in oil and gas and for whatever reason SMU, Houston and UT are out of the picture, what are the best alternatives?  Tulsa?  Oklahoma?  Denver?  Colorado?  Texas Tech?  Baylor?  Anywhere else?  Anywhere in California?

Does anyone know?

Best,
Maclock

27
Hello there, folks.  If one wished to specialize in oil and gas and for whatever reason SMU, Houston and UT are out of the picture, what are the best alternatives?  Tulsa?  Oklahoma?  Denver?  Colorado?  Texas Tech?  Baylor?  Anywhere else?  Anywhere in California?

Does anyone know?

Best,
Maclock

28
Law School Applications / Re: Two-year JDs for foreign-trained lawyers
« on: April 19, 2008, 08:54:52 PM »
Add Notre Dame, Colorado, GWU, and Loyola (LA) to the list.  I believe that these schools will allow advance standing for LLB-holders.

Weel, its not advaced standing as you still have to do the first year courses like all 1L's, its just they give you 30 credits as already taken electives becuase of your previous degree. I think most law schools do this actually.

Perhaps Kansas is the only law school that will allow common law-trained lawyers to skip most of the first-year courses, then.  Property, contracts, torts, criminal, legal writing (or derivatives thereof)...bletch!  I think Kansas only obliges common law-trained two-year JD candidates to take American constitutional law and American civil procedure rather than all of the foregoing.  Once you have taken these two courses, it's elective time!  Far preferred to repeating one's learning of the basics of the common law system.

Sigh...Kansas is a solid school.  I wish it were more highly-ranked.

29
Law School Applications / Re: Two-year JDs for foreign-trained lawyers
« on: April 19, 2008, 04:40:22 PM »
Add Notre Dame, Colorado, GWU, and Loyola (LA) to the list.  I believe that these schools will allow advance standing for LLB-holders.

30
Law School Applications / Re: Two-year JDs for foreign-trained lawyers
« on: April 19, 2008, 04:28:33 PM »
Stetson, too, apparently.

Any in Texas?  Houston will decide on transfer credits after one has completed a full year of study in the JD program, but that sucks if you've already trained at a reputable school in the common law world and you have to repeat all of those distasteful first-year courses before a decision is made about what courses you might have to take to graduate....

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