Law School Discussion

Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - kilroy55

Pages: 1 ... 5 6 7 8 9 [10] 11 12 13 14 15 ... 42
91
Current Law Students / Re: law school relationships/love?
« on: June 15, 2007, 09:54:29 AM »
Even as a 2L? And if so, where? The reason I ask is because I think this time around I would be more compatiable with another law student (or grad student) who is understanding and wants something serious. Is volunteering at some place needing legal services sound like a good idea?

I just got out of a three year relationship and wanted to know if law students, or even lawyers for that matter, have a hard time finding someone in law school or in the legal field. I could just be jaded due to my recent break-up, but with a law student's/lawyer's time constraints, how hard is it to find a a significant other?

I helped plan and wedding during my first year, and I was married during my second and soon to be third year.  You can date, and find someone.  Law school, if you are efficient, does not take all your time.

You will meet people in law school.  My wife is very understanding, even when we were planning our wedding.  I would have to drive down to Virginia Beach every few weekends, and I was living in Pennsylvania and her in DC.  We managed.  She moved, so we are both in PA.  She is working, and I am going to school.  She knows when to let me study.  I also am very efficient.  I get my work down when she is not around.  She also leaves for a weekend during finals, just so she isn't a distraction.  She goes to visit her friends or parents.  It has worked out great.  My GPA has actually gone up since I got married.  If you have an understanding spouse or significant other, it makes all teh difference in the world.

92
Current Law Students / Re: law school relationships/love?
« on: June 15, 2007, 08:42:45 AM »
I just got out of a three year relationship and wanted to know if law students, or even lawyers for that matter, have a hard time finding someone in law school or in the legal field. I could just be jaded due to my recent break-up, but with a law student's/lawyer's time constraints, how hard is it to find a a significant other?

I helped plan and wedding during my first year, and I was married during my second and soon to be third year.  You can date, and find someone.  Law school, if you are efficient, does not take all your time.

93
100 practice exam?  That's craziness.  And I had classmates that thought *I* was crazy b/c I did every single one.  Don't freak the guy out.  I think it's unlikely that most professors release more than 4 practice exams.

I also don't think that doing practice exams a month before the end of the class is very helpful.  You can't answer 1/4 of the question, because you still have 1/4 of the class left.

The rest I don't disagree with, although some of them like his policy tidbit I think isn't strictly necessary.

Just to comment.

I did indeed do a total of 100 practice exams, but that was spread out across all my classes (so really on about two dozen per class). Most of my professors provided NO sample exams, and so the ones I was working from came from the public online databases I mentioned. And I wasn't trying to freak anyone out--I'm just saying that here is what I did to get into the top 10%.

And note that the 1/4 problem did not exist for me, because it tied in with having finished all of the reading a month in advance. Even if we hadn't covered the issue in class yet, I was still able to get practice spotting them and applying what I believed to be the law based upon the reading (and it was always easy to tweak if the professor wanted a different approach). Professors almost always rush at the end of the semester, and so it was nice for all of that material to feel like old hat by the time I arrived in the final week.

I think the real question is was doing that many necessary.  Obviously it was for you, but I think most people are better served by not worry about 100 practice exams.

94
2. There is a general sense in the industry that part time programs aren't as good as full time programs.

This is not the impression my employer gives.  They like part time people because they tend to be older, and thus are more stable.  They also tend to be already established in the area they are looking for work, so most will remain in the area after they graduate.

Yeah, I hear anecdotes about employers preferring part time students sometimes.  I'm just basing that statement on an evening student alumni event at my school, in which a judge said that many of the big firms in the area have a bias against part time students. 

 

Well BIGLAW is biased against everyone not full-time, Top 10%, law review, Ivy/T14, white, male.

95
2. There is a general sense in the industry that part time programs aren't as good as full time programs.

This is not the impression my employer gives.  They like part time people because they tend to be older, and thus are more stable.  They also tend to be already established in the area they are looking for work, so most will remain in the area after they graduate.

96
I am surprised that your school splits courses like that.  Most schools are actually moving away from two semesters of anything.  I only had 1 semester of Torts, Contracts, Property, Con law, Crim law etc...  But, I know for a fact, I had transfer students in some of my 1L classes.

97
Current Law Students / Re: How many As.
« on: June 14, 2007, 07:37:18 AM »
At my school, it breaks down like this:


Expect 15% A and A-.
Expect 15% C+ and below.
Expect 3-7% D and below.
Half are B+ to B-

Rougly 5 percent fail.

The remaining percentages allow for faculty wiggle room.  And the handbook only states these are "suggested" grading norms, not mandatory.  But in my experience, profs will hand out more Bs and Cs rather than give more As.

98
Current Law Students / Re: Rank Question - No Guessing Required
« on: June 13, 2007, 09:19:31 AM »
Even if you can't sign up through your campus OCI, there is nothing to stop you from contacting the firm and explaining how much you really want to work for the firm, then asking if you could interview with the firm.  I doubt that many firms would have such a strict cut-off that they would refuse to talk to you, and it may make you seem more enthusiastic about the particular firm.

You've obviously never dealt with firms with Top 10% cut offs.  If they see Top 15%, and everyone else in the pile is top 10%, you will not get an interview.

99
Current Law Students / Re: Is 2L really easier?
« on: June 12, 2007, 02:49:52 PM »
Its easier only in that you already know how to study law.  By far I think 2L is more work, but less hard, if that makes sense.  Many people have full load, part-time job, law review, other activities, plus you have 2L summer job search.  This can make for a very rough year.  In addition, the amount of reading is greater.  My fall of 2L I took Tax, Arbitration, Pro Rep, Sales (UCC Art. 2), Con. Law of Religion and Law review.  This past semester I was in Evidence, Corporations, Remedies, Ag. Law and Trust and Estates plus law review.  This can be very daunting, and when you are trying to pull up your GPA, it could be even harder.  Good luck to you.

100
Current Law Students / Re: Rank Question - No Guessing Required
« on: June 12, 2007, 02:44:22 PM »
No, because simple math shows that in order to be in the Top 10% it is 26 and under.  If you put Top 10%, although it is small, some firms my look at your funny and ask questions.  Put Top 11% or Top 15% and move one spot next semester. 

Pages: 1 ... 5 6 7 8 9 [10] 11 12 13 14 15 ... 42