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Messages - Name Changing Queen

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71
From what you say, about working with human rights and everything, I think you'd be crazy to turn down Case.  It has everything you want, everything your fiancee wants.

Well, I don't know, maybe the Cincinnati scholarship is really attractive.  I've never been to Cincinnati and it's the one law school in Ohio I haven't visited, but my Ohio friends seem to think Cincinnati is super conservative (the city that is) and more a part of Kentucky than Ohio.  I don't know if that matters at all.

Plus, I'm going to Case. So I am biased.

72
Choosing the Right Law School / Re: Ohio schools?
« on: April 28, 2005, 11:45:43 AM »
I'm torn between Cleveland-Marshall with a $3,000 scholarship and Capital with a $16,000 scholarship. Cleveland is ranked higher then Capital but from what I've been hearing Capital seems to be a decent school. Name Changing Queen how would you rate the two. What do you think is a better school to transfer out of. I want to return to DC and attend GW, Au or Georgetown following my first year as I wish to practice in the metro area. In short, what do you think is a better school? Which school has better firms and better summer internships?

Well, I asked some students about transferring out of Capital and they said the school doesn't like it and can make it kind of hard to do... I guess they are tired of people trying to transfer to OSU.  (I'm in at OSU and my husband at Capital, and he wanted to transfer from Cap to OSU after a year).  I asked someone in admissions at OSU about the same thing, and they too said Capital frowns upon this, but that it does happen. Of course, you aren't trying to transfer to OSU.

I don't know about the ease of transferring out of Cleveland Marshall. But they do have a high non-academic attrition rate, and that might mean people are transferring.  In fact, that might be a good way to broach the subject if you call Cleveland.  You can ask " I'm concerned about the 22 percent attrition rate.  Can you tell me why it is so high?" and then they might tell you how many are "just transferring out".  It would probably not be a good idea to ask "I am interested in using your school to launch me to a better one.  Will that be easy?"

Both Cleveland and Capital are very strong in their own cities, and they both seem to focus pretty tightly on that territory.  I didn't see a lot of out-of-state summer options.  But I am sure there must be at least some students who go to DC.

I got the impression that Cleveland was a much stronger school. I don't mean to knock Capital.  Capital was fine.  But Cleveland had a more... established feeling.  And their job stats are excellent.  Both schools are particularly good at placing grads in hot government jobs, and of the two I would have to say Cleveland has more big firms knocking on their door.

If you look at how many grads stay in state and stuff, neither of these schools are great launching pads to DC careers.  I can see why you want to transfer.

I don't know if any of this is helpful, and I strongly suggest you do some better research.  Maybe you can talk to current students.  A visit would be well worth it.

73
Choosing the Right Law School / Re: Ohio schools?
« on: April 27, 2005, 09:39:47 PM »
Oh, and I visited Ohio State and Case Western.  The OP didn't ask about those schools.  I really liked both schools, and will go to one of them.  So just briefly:

Ohio State, yes it really is huge.  The law school, a largely self-contained facility, is embedded in a big undergrad u-district just teeming with 19 yr olds.  Lots of broken glass on the streets, virtually no parking, and a half-burnt mattress here or there on a lawn.  Pretty typical university district stuff, just increased by some exponential degree.  I found the area a little flavorless.  Others would disagree. 

However, as I have said before (see my capital review), I think quite highly of Columbus on the whole, and would be very easy to commute back and forth from a nicer part of Columbus.

Here again my tour was fast, but in brief glimpses I was assured that the facilities are more than adequate, the library was pretty nice really, and the students seemed friendly and... I don't know, serious. 

The admissions guy I met with (for two hours!) was extremely candid with me about the admissions process, school strategies and tricks of the trade.  He answered all of my questions very completely and knowledgably.  Really, he is my favorite admissions guy of all time.  ( I have visited a LOT of schools, so it is not a title without distinguishment).

I'm trying to stay brief, so on to Case...

Case seemed to me to be the most ideally located, in the culturally lively University Circle, surrounded by museums and galleries and musical venues, and trees.  Lots of trees.  I have been naieve about Ohio.  Also, there are bike trails all over the place, with each park linked to another park in an "emerald necklace" and a botanical garden across the street.  I also like it that Case, I mean the university as a whole, is 70% graduate students.  It gives a certain feel to the campus that I find more agreeable than the atmosphere of predominantly undergraduate campuses.

But then Case costs a lot of money, so thats the least they can offer!  I had a great and thorough tour of this campus, and met with another wonderfully knowledgable admissions person.  She was an enthusiastic alumnus.

They are redoing the library, and judging by the completed sections, I would say the library will be upgraded from "poor" to "so-so" (purely from an aesthetic standpoint, I can't evaluate the collections beyond the number of volumes).  Library staff seemed really helpful.  In the brief moment I was there, a staff member wanted to help me find something.

Damn I was going to keep this short.  If you are considering Case, you are probably already aware of all the impressive programs and all that.  I didn't meet any professors or attend a class (too late for classes).  The students I met seemed lively, friendly (can't use that word enough, can I?) and scholarly-like.  There is a pub in the student union which I think is a pretty cool idea.  Seemed like a pretty progressive/liberal school...

So that's it for my Ohio reviews.  Ask if you have q's. I doubt I know much more than I have already written, but I'll try.

74
Choosing the Right Law School / Re: Ohio schools?
« on: April 27, 2005, 03:32:00 PM »
And now Cleveland State (I'm reviewing all five like Paperback asked, but I do feel a little bit like I have hijacked this thread).

Cleveland State is another downtown law school, in Cleveland of course.  First of all, last of all, and somewhere in the middle, the library is really awesome.  There is an amazing sense of space. Study desks are perched overlooking downtown through huge windows, and just over the rail you can see down several floors of the airy library.

Otherwise, the building was rather average, with rather plain classrooms.  The surrounding neighborhood seems to offer only a Subway by way of lunch options, but if you walk a few blocks, you can reach another Subway!  Parking seemed easy on a weekday afternoon and parking meters are only 50 cents an hour.  Wow!  The location is not so very far from the theatre district and all that, so having a parking space at the school 24/7 might prove useful on weekends too.

I didn't meet any professors, but there were a few students at study in the library or scampering through the halls, and they seemed like friendly guys.  Certainly, Cleveland State has great employment statistics and a strong core program.  I can't say I learned much more from my visit than the physical presence of the building.  My tour was fast, and didn't include the clinics, student services, the moot court room or anything in depth like that.  And the student who gave me the tour, while perfectly amiable, did not seem to have been much briefed about the school.  He did say that the degree will get you a job "anywhere in a ten mile radius" which I believe (hope) undercuts the school quite a bit. 

Some staff were playing indoor golf in a long empty room in the basement and they seemed a little bit drunk.  I liked this.

75
Choosing the Right Law School / Re: Ohio schools?
« on: April 27, 2005, 03:12:09 PM »
All of that was just on Ohio Northern, so moving on to Capital:

While I had 24 hrs out at ONU, I had 1 hr at Capital, so I have less to say about it.  It is, as I have said before, in a handsome building in downtown Columbus, quite apart from its undergraduate institution.

There seemed to be an uncommon preoccupation with security at this school.  I came in the only unlocked door (in back), was checked in at the security desk, and then led to the admissions office by a security guard.  Well, that might not have been for security's sake.  Maybe he was just doing me a favor: Capital is very hard to negotiate for a beginner.  It is a recently converted building, criscrossed with hallways in bizarre patterns, and with elevators that go to either the right side or left side of a floor (the floor being divided in such a way that to go from one side to another, one must first go to another floor to make the transition).  Maybe there was just one divided floor.  And I am notorious for getting my sense of direction all mixed up in buildings...

Anyway, it was afternoon and the halls were pretty empty.  In the basement was a modest room where students can by coffee and bagels at the "peoples court" counter, or use a microwave.  The classrooms were all right, the building was wireless, the staff seemed friendly if sleepy, and it was clear to me that not many people hang out there after 2 on Friday.

I thought it was nice that security has a little shuttle van and will drive you to your car after a long night at the library.  Also, the law school seemed very well located for externships in capital buildings, with courthouses and other important buildings just a few blocks away. 

And I very much liked Columbus.  The downtown was compact, clean and sleepy, but many of the neighborhoods were more interesting.  I especially liked the cobblestone streets of German Village, the city parks were lovely, and the Short North Arts District and parts of Clintonville seemed promising.




I have recently visited Ohio State, Capital, Case Western, Ohio Northern and Cleveland State. If anyone is interested, they could pm about my visits... I don't know that I could answer much, but I would try.

Why don't you go ahead and post your reviews on this thread?

All right, its just that there are 5 schools, and most of them have been covered (better) by others... and I'm not very good at brevity!

Ohio Northern:
Orion is the expert here.  An outsider's perspective:  It is windy and flat and the town is oppressively small, but everyone is extraordinarily friendly.  While I was there, I asked directions to the pharmacy to buy a hair dryer, and the person I asked instead slipped around the corner to her home and returned with a dryer for me to borrow.
I looked at places to rent, because I was really seriously considering this school (I've since decided it isn't quite the best choice for me). 

I looked at three places.  2 were right "downtown" (three blocks or so with businesses).  One of them had no windows at all!  I mean none!  Just a door to a hallway. Super cheap rent for a big two bedroom, but quite a deathtrap.  By the way, across the street abother apt building had just burnt down, so the thought of fire did not seem so remote.  Right next door was train tracks.  When I asked is they were much used, the landlord said no, but it was a sore subject because two days before a young woman had committed suicide by jumping in front of the train.  "Right there," he said sadly.  Yikes.  I then looked at a third place, the first floor of a house.  The floors all sloped but it was cute.  There was only one room that had such a slope as to make it virtually unusable (about a 4 foot height difference between the two ends of the room, with a hill in the middle).  Still it was huge, and several of the rooms were quite nice.  I think maybe I didn't do suhc a good job of looking for a place.

Now, the school:  I met many profs and students and everyone seemed to really be working together and having a good time.  The profs seemed distinguished, good-humored and talented.  The programs seemed solid.  The building was fine.  The admin staff was fabulous.  They put you up on campus, and the campus is really quite nice (though, as Orion predicted, the trees were all broken, 400 of them destroyed by a recent ice storm).  I met students who were doing exciting things this summer, all over the country.  On Thursdays, there is a coffee hour (which I joined) during which students and profs eat free cakes and drink free coffee and genuinely chum around.

I would say this seemed liked a comfortable, supportive school, in a friendly, tiny, town in the middle of nowhere.  I also drove to Lima and Findlay.  As you come in to Lima there is a useful stripmall area where you can get your oil changed, etc.  Many people raved about the walmart there-- a recent addition I bet. It is 24 hrs!  It's a grocery, pharmacy, eyeglasses shop, tire center!  In short, a supercenter.  Sorry, I digress. I don't like Walmart.  The courthouses in Lima and Findlay are beautiful.  Fundlay has this crazy street of Victorian mansions.  Lima seemed a little junky downtown, and we couldn't find anything to eat.  But then, we didn't know where to look.  I ended up eating breaded, fried walleye and kale.  Yucky sense memory.
 


76
Choosing the Right Law School / Re: Ohio schools?
« on: April 27, 2005, 09:30:11 AM »
I am still waiting on six schools, but I wanted to ask about three of them: University of Dayton, Capital University, and Ohio Northern. Has anyone heard from them? Gotten accepted/rejected/wait listed? Is anyone, as of right now, planning to attend one of these schools? Why? Do you know anything about the towns they are in? I sent in my applications later than most people (but still by the deadline), so I have no idea when I will receive decisions. According to the LSAC Calculator, I have a 50-60 % chance of getting into these schools. Anyway, I've done some research on the schools/towns, but I am looking to get some personal perspectives as well. Thanks! 


I have recently visited Ohio State, Capital, Case Western, Ohio Northern and Cleveland State. If anyone is interested, they could pm about my visits... I don't know that I could answer much, but I would try.

Why don't you go ahead and post your reviews on this thread?

All right, its just that there are 5 schools, and most of them have been covered (better) by others... and I'm not very good at brevity!

Ohio Northern:
Orion is the expert here.  An outsider's perspective:  It is windy and flat and the town is oppressively small, but everyone is extraordinarily friendly.  While I was there, I asked directions to the pharmacy to buy a hair dryer, and the person I asked instead slipped around the corner to her home and returned with a dryer for me to borrow.
I looked at places to rent, because I was really seriously considering this school (I've since decided it isn't quite the best choice for me). 

I looked at three places.  2 were right "downtown" (three blocks or so with businesses).  One of them had no windows at all!  I mean none!  Just a door to a hallway. Super cheap rent for a big two bedroom, but quite a deathtrap.  By the way, across the street abother apt building had just burnt down, so the thought of fire did not seem so remote.  Right next door was train tracks.  When I asked is they were much used, the landlord said no, but it was a sore subject because two days before a young woman had committed suicide by jumping in front of the train.  "Right there," he said sadly.  Yikes.  I then looked at a third place, the first floor of a house.  The floors all sloped but it was cute.  There was only one room that had such a slope as to make it virtually unusable (about a 4 foot height difference between the two ends of the room, with a hill in the middle).  Still it was huge, and several of the rooms were quite nice.  I think maybe I didn't do suhc a good job of looking for a place.

Now, the school:  I met many profs and students and everyone seemed to really be working together and having a good time.  The profs seemed distinguished, good-humored and talented.  The programs seemed solid.  The building was fine.  The admin staff was fabulous.  They put you up on campus, and the campus is really quite nice (though, as Orion predicted, the trees were all broken, 400 of them destroyed by a recent ice storm).  I met students who were doing exciting things this summer, all over the country.  On Thursdays, there is a coffee hour (which I joined) during which students and profs eat free cakes and drink free coffee and genuinely chum around.

I would say this seemed liked a comfortable, supportive school, in a friendly, tiny, town in the middle of nowhere.  I also drove to Lima and Findlay.  As you come in to Lima there is a useful stripmall area where you can get your oil changed, etc.  Many people raved about the walmart there-- a recent addition I bet. It is 24 hrs!  It's a grocery, pharmacy, eyeglasses shop, tire center!  In short, a supercenter.  Sorry, I digress. I don't like Walmart.  The courthouses in Lima and Findlay are beautiful.  Fundlay has this crazy street of Victorian mansions.  Lima seemed a little junky downtown, and we couldn't find anything to eat.  But then, we didn't know where to look.  I ended up eating breaded, fried walleye and kale.  Yucky sense memory.
 

77
Choosing the Right Law School / Re: Strange email from Akron
« on: April 27, 2005, 09:13:28 AM »
I went to the Akron openhouse for admitted students, and one of the things they mentioned was that Akron doesn't do 'grade inflation' and that indeed, you really have to work and be at the top of your class to have A's.

That may be good for self-esteem (knowing that your 2.5 is better than another school's 3.5),  but it isn't helpful for keeping scholarship money.

They did point out that, even if you lost all or part of your scholarship after the first year, their tuition is still far more reasonable than elsewhere.


That's true.  Actually instate tuition is about 10k, so nobody in their right mind should take the 2.5 GPA option, because all that would do is make the 10k of 2nd year tuition more easily attainable.  With the stipend option you get that 10k upfront, and still have a shot at 2nd year coverage.  Either way, you still need a 3.3 to retain the scholarship into the third year.  So the only difference is: Do I want to make it easy to retain this scholarship into the second year (worth 10k) or do I want the 10k upfront with the possibility of getting the scholarship 2nd year (worth 10k-20k) see?  I'm not desribing this well, maybe nobody will understand.

78
Choosing the Right Law School / Re: Strange email from Akron
« on: April 25, 2005, 07:26:28 PM »
I got this offer as well.  And guess what?  To keep a 3.3 you pretty much have to be in the 15% of the class.

The more I look at the scholarship offers I have received, the more evident it is to me that some schools offer scholarships on a "revolving" basis.  Some admissions people have even admitted as much to me.  They reassign the money over and over to first-years.  At MANY schools, fewer than half of people with scholarships renew.  Now this isn't really true of top schools, or any school that lets you renew as long as you are in good standing.  But I just have to tell y'all, if you are turning down a school you prefer because a school you like less is offering money, MAKE SURE you have a good shot at keeping the money.  Be prepared!

79
Choosing the Right Law School / Re: Ohio schools?
« on: April 25, 2005, 07:18:32 PM »
I am still waiting on six schools, but I wanted to ask about three of them: University of Dayton, Capital University, and Ohio Northern. Has anyone heard from them? Gotten accepted/rejected/wait listed? Is anyone, as of right now, planning to attend one of these schools? Why? Do you know anything about the towns they are in? I sent in my applications later than most people (but still by the deadline), so I have no idea when I will receive decisions. According to the LSAC Calculator, I have a 50-60 % chance of getting into these schools. Anyway, I've done some research on the schools/towns, but I am looking to get some personal perspectives as well. Thanks! 



I have recently visited Ohio State, Capital, Case Western, Ohio Northern and Cleveland State. If anyone is interested, they could pm about my visits... I don't know that I could answer much, but I would try.

80
Choosing the Right Law School / Re: Ohio schools?
« on: April 25, 2005, 07:14:21 PM »
Just throwing in my $.02 (hey paperback ;) )

Paperback is right about Capital. It is VERY highly regarded in central Ohio. People here actually think it is better than OSU and you have a hard time convincing them that OSU is higher ranked. Capital is in a really cute place. It is still basically Columbus, but Bexley is lovely and can have a smaller town feel if you like that. It is literally a hop, skip, and a jump away from absolutely everything, though, which is like the best of both worlds. Good luck in your decision!

Uhhhh... Capital's Law school is nowhere near Bexley.  It is right downtown, 3 miles south of OSU in an idd building that is attractive from the outside, with very tight security and a confusing internal structure (converted building used to house a law firm and an insurance group and some other offices, so there are some confusing elements-- like the two elevators go to the same floor, but you can't walk from one side of the floor to the other).  I imagine you'd get used to it.

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