Law School Discussion

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Messages - Burhop

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11
Personal Statement / Re: Patterns I've seen
« on: October 26, 2007, 06:19:36 AM »
EssayEdge.com is pretty great, but feel free to send some business my way as well!


Glad to see this thread is alive and kickin'. ;-)

Dani

12
Personal Statement / Re: Patterns I've seen
« on: February 18, 2006, 03:19:15 PM »
my impression is that schools with part time programs often have a higher average age. There has been a movement towards older students having an admissions edge--I just read a curious article that insinuated that MBAs & Law schools are often fighting over the same students, so there's a weird flip-flop going on right now, because MBAs are trying to "steal" younger students straight out of undergrad even though they traditionally prefer work experience, and law schools are gravitating towards students who've been out in the world doing stuff for a couple years (a la Northwestern.)

a quick scan through some school's numbers shows 'average ages' of 24-26. Dunno if there's any aggregate data out there to be had.

Dani

13
Personal Statement / Re: Patterns I've seen
« on: February 14, 2006, 12:52:20 AM »
I've always been interested in the law, but it took some time away from academia to make me realize that it was really what I wanted to do.  And there are certain similarities between my job and the law that I was planning to address... I like what I do now, but I want to use the skills I've learned on a larger scale.  The decision was definitely a gradual realization -- no lightning bolts here.

My problem is that tricky "why entertainment?" side of things, because to be honest, it was kind of a whim, and I'm not sure if that's a positive answer for adcomms.  I don't want them to think I'm not serious about going to law school.

you're in great shape because you are starting so early! You've got plenty of time to brainstorm.

I recommend you start a number of introductions. Just write, don't even think about it. After writing 3-5 intros about wildly different things/topics/stories/themes, step away for a bit and come back. Which are you most excited to continue with? You could also post them on here to get reactions--which intro would another reader be the most intrigued by?

Use the time cushion you've given yourself by starting early and really make it work for you. Feel free to drop me a line if you'd like me to look at stuff.

Oh, the non-trad thing--if you graduated in '02 at 21 and worked for a few years, you aren't a non-trad. A non-trad either  A) graduated university much later in life or B) is applying something like a decade + after graduating.

Tho, others on the board can correct me if I'm wrong about that. ;-)

best,

dani

14
Personal Statement / Re: Patterns I've seen
« on: February 11, 2006, 05:02:30 AM »
*bump* for those looking for patterns to avoid

~dani

15
well, you make one of the standard mistakes--you cram a whole autobiography in there. There's also a lot in here that involves things happening to you, as opposed to you actively doing things. You also open with the childhood memoir--a prominent theme this cycle.

On the plus side, you write well, and your prose is clear and not too flowery. You come across as honest and forthright. This PS, as-is, would probably not really count against you at any school your numbers make you a decent fit for, but it is unlikely to make you stand out from the crowd, and wouldn't give any 'reaches' a good reason to take you on. There is no image in here of you that is memorable for the reader, and if I were asked what this PS was about, I'd say "some childhood stuff in Europe and a very ill brother." Ideally, when someone is done with the PS and is summarizing salient points, those points read something like "he did this and this supremely well, and is very interested in this school of thought/field/bucket o' notions"--what have you.

In sum: decently written, but not yet working nearly hard enough for you. I would recommend (if there is a full overhaul possibility) that you focus in on things you accomplished recently and very well. And then, only 1-3 things; adcomms read these quickly, so you can't expect them to pick up all of your life details. You need to find the right story, commit to it, and tell it very well. IMHO.

best of luck!

Dani

16
Personal Statement / Re: Need SERIOUS help with topic
« on: January 30, 2006, 12:45:11 AM »
I honestly am trying to think of something I have done and done well.  That is sad isn't it?  I can't think of anything that I think would be worth writing about.  Probably the most enjoyable thing I ever did was holding the position of Director of Performing Arts on our Student Activities Board.  I was in charge of organizing larger scale events for the University and Community which were all very successful events. 
I am not sure if this would even be worth writing about though.  I only did it for a year and was reelected to the position but I resigned because my father was very ill and died three months later.  I don't really want to go into that in the statement (my father's passing).  I am not sure.

in charge of large scale events? Were you enthusiastic about this role? If so, write about it. It sounds like you had a good amount of responsibility.

dani

17
Personal Statement / Re: Seeking suggestions for "Why law school?" essay
« on: January 30, 2006, 12:40:56 AM »
man, I can't believe how many posts this thread suddenly has!

I think, as a general rule:

1) avoid blanket statements against anyone/thing; instead, speak of what you believe in/stand up for.

2) If your interest in law is due to being troubled by something, be specific: Say, the wiretapping scandal; more subpoenas of the media; parts of the Patriot Act; funding abstinence; the vetting process of supreme court justices. Make it clear for the reader what you're concerned about--make it concrete.

best,

dani

18
Personal Statement / Re: Seeking suggestions for "Why law school?" essay
« on: January 29, 2006, 10:31:22 PM »
well, for jollies, I'll tell you how I approached that topic, and maybe some others will as well. That might help you free up the block.

My interests are in international law, environmental law, and human rights. I especially like the nexus of these disciplines, and find that cases that combine elements of each are really up my alley (see: Sheila Watt-Cloutier and the Inuit trying to sue the US for Global Warming via the Inter-American Court of Human Rights; The Marsh Arabs of Iraq trying to reclaim their decimated wetlands and re-think the lifestyle of their land to include things like eco-tourism, even though the Greenies would probably prefer they stay an idyllic indigenous tribe; Brazil's difficulty in implementing environmental protections for their precious ecosystems (that the world might use for, say new fancy cancer drugs), especially in the face of serious poverty and some of the world's worst income inequities--how do you tell a poor farmer who needs to feed his family not to cut down trees?). I also really love good legal writing, and how even though lawyers are known for speaking latinate gibberish most of the time, a Supreme Court Justice will sometimes craft an opinion so compelling that it just sings right off the page. Finally, I just like the discipline that comes with  the law; the ability to suss out precedent, cobble together framing mechanisms, and debate folks on a whole new level is vastly appealing to me.

That's not really what I wrote in my essay, but it's why I'm down with law school. I'd actually be curious to hear how other folks on the board felt drawn to the law.

best,

Dani

19
Personal Statement / Re: Need SERIOUS help with topic
« on: January 29, 2006, 10:15:26 PM »
The PS should not be about a "life-changing experience." Thinking of it that way will lead to an essay that speaks only of things that have happened to you, and not of things you have personally accomplished.

Write about something you did, and did well. If it changed your life--bonus.

best,

Dani

20
the DA thing will work if you have a specific incident/responsibility you can talk up. It won't be enough to say "I worked for a DA, I learned a lot, it seemed interesting, blah blah, these were my responsibilities." You need a storyline--a project you completed, or a person you helped by going out of your way.

Maybe think of it this way: if you were telling a friend about the funniest/hardest things you had to accomplish while there, what stories would you tell? What were the days you came home from work, dying to tell someone about something that happened? What did you do that made you really feel like you'd accomplished something special? Aim for specific and concrete.

best,

dani

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