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Messages - littletanuki

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21
General board for soon-to-be 1Ls / Re: Prepping for law school
« on: April 14, 2005, 12:40:06 PM »

i feel more comfortable prepping a la PLS because i've been out of school for a while and thus my confidence to quickly assimilate is a little low.  i have no intentions of being a gunner...just a nerd. ;)

22
General board for soon-to-be 1Ls / Re: Planet Law School II
« on: April 13, 2005, 10:55:07 PM »


4. Having done the prep over the summer, you are in a better position once classes start, as you are already familiar with the main ideas. You know what to focus on for exams and you are probably less stressed than everyone else who hasn't a clue what might lay ahead of them.


You honestly think you're going to know what to focus on for exams before you ever step foot in the classroom? That's pretty silly. Every professor is likely to focus on certain things in class that will inevitably show up on the exam, and there's no way in hell you can figure that out before you even start school.


Specifics?  No idea.  General idea of what to expect on final exams?  You bet.  Call me silly, call me whatever you want.  The fact that a prof spends several hours a week "focusing" on policy over something else doesn't change the fact that he will want a well written final exam in which you the student apply black letter law you should have been learning to the hypothetical situation the prof has devised for you. 


23
General board for soon-to-be 1Ls / Re: Planet Law School II
« on: April 13, 2005, 09:21:14 PM »

Let's see:

1.  He's suggesting that we buy just about everything under the sun just to PREP for LS.  I'm not made of money.

2.  The book makes it seem like there is absolutely NO WAY to survive law school if you don't follow his advice, but his advice would have me prepping like 24/7 and I don't have that kind of time.  I have a job.

3.  His view of the classroom experience is less than comforting. 

4.  What?  I'm supposed to do all my assignments and read the 9,000 books he's suggesting and still have time to eat or take a piss?  I don't think so.

THAT is what's freaking me out.

1.  I bought all of the core subject primers he suggests and the Delaney books for under $200 by using the Amazon marketplace or Half.com.   I've seen the LEEWS system on ebay for pretty cheap...$60?  I'm by no means made of money either.

2.  If you follow the 13 week schedule (which gives you more than enough time to finish before school starts), you'll see you're not doing that much work per week.   

3.  Perhaps his visualization of the law school classroom experience is worst-case scenario, but wouldn't you rather prepare for the worst and be pleasantly surprised if you're wrong?  His point is that the profs don't teach you black letter law by lecturing about it to you and telling you what you need to know as profs did about your typical subject matter in college.  You have to do a lot of the work on your own.  I prefer his "know your enemy" tactic myself.

4.  Having done the prep over the summer, you are in a better position once classes start, as you are already familiar with the main ideas.  You know what to focus on for exams and you are probably less stressed than everyone else who hasn't a clue what might lay ahead of them. 

I was freaked out when I started to read the book too, but I appreciated the brutal honesty.  I wanted to know what to expect, and I got a very clear picture.  I hope it's not as bad as the author insists it is, and I would like to think that I'm a "natural born genius of the law", but the odds aren't in my favor, so I'm choosing to go with the PLS approach.  Don't let it scare you!

24
PLS II hands down.  Get ready for a rough ride though...his criticisms of the law school "professoriat" are brutal but enlightening.  What I have found invaluable about this book is the advice on how to prepare for the law school experience...not only what to expect in terms of classes/academics, but what you can do to increase your chances of success (i.e.: GRADES). 

25
General board for soon-to-be 1Ls / Re: Prepping for law school
« on: April 13, 2005, 10:18:56 AM »
Why not look into the Delaney series:  Learning Legal Reasoning and How to Do Your Best on Law School Exams. 

I'm working through Learning Legal Reasoning right now, and so far it's been very instructive.  I haven't started on the Exams book yet....

26
Denials / Re: Most Obnoxious Rejection Letter
« on: April 07, 2005, 03:07:57 PM »

I don't know about rejection letters, but -- pre-WS at least -- they are a bitter bunch. I visited Fenway Park last year on a baseball stadium road trip, and the attitudes of many Bostonians was just nasty. It took me longer to get into the spirit of the great Red Sox post-season than it would have before my visit.

Hopefully, they can keep that stick out of their ass for a while.

Boston Red Sox fans can be a vicious bunch when it comes to their team, but I don't think it's fair to write off a whole city worth of people based on what you witnessed at Fenway.  And if you were rooting for anyone other than the Red Sox, any nastiness that was directed at you was well deserved... ;)
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me...seven?  Yeah, still waiting, though I was complete beginning of Jan, so it's probably still going to be a while.  And I ain't holding my breath for this one...my numbers are less than stellar for them.. 

28
]

Yes, PI is competitive...though, not as competitive unless you're applying for one of the really prestigious orgs like ACLU, etc. If you're applying to local agencies, then they're not as competitive.

Paid Summer Fellowships are extremely competitive and rare. NYU had a public interest career fair a couple of months ago and only like 1 or 2 orgs even had paid summer work...most want you to work for free.


Quite a few schools have a Public Interest Law Fellowship program that raises money for students interested in working in the PI field during the summer.  They provide a stipend that will help defray the cost of living etc.  Granted, it's not the type of money you'd make if you were taking a summer associate position at a large or even medium sized firm, but for those of us interested in PI, it can be the difference between taking a job and taking a job we want.   

29
Acceptances / Re: Northeastern
« on: March 31, 2005, 09:23:20 PM »
WL came in a deceptively thick legal sized envelope.

30
Acceptances / Re: Northeastern
« on: March 31, 2005, 03:24:07 PM »
I got waitlisted there the other day with a 3.53 and 158 LSAT (average of 153+162).  I'm pretty bummed as it was my first choice.  :( I'm staying on the WL, but I don't know that they take too many people from it....

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