Law School Discussion

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Messages - Jolie Was Here

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11
I can relate on the money front. I had the double-whammy of a relatively high EFC plus absolutely nothing to show for my salary (apparently they don't consider existing student debt?) and I had financed both my UG and graduate degrees. But a few reassuring words:

1. How long have you been taking care of yourself? I was lucky–I was old enough at matriculation that I could exclude my parents' info, so I ended up with some relatively generous need-based grants. My income was high compared to most new law students, but not compared to their parents!  :D If you've been filing your own income taxes for (I believe it was) 5 years or more, they'll count you as independent.


Maybe this is new, but it says here they don't count parents' info http://www.law.umich.edu/prospectivestudents/admissions/financial/applyingaid/Pages/finaid-1l.aspx (first full paragraph after the bullet points). Or am I misunderstanding...?

Ah, that IS new. Or, it's at least new since fall '06.  ;D

12
I can relate on the money front. I had the double-whammy of a relatively high EFC plus absolutely nothing to show for my salary (apparently they don't consider existing student debt?) and I had financed both my UG and graduate degrees. But a few reassuring words:

1. How long have you been taking care of yourself? I was lucky–I was old enough at matriculation that I could exclude my parents' info, so I ended up with some relatively generous need-based grants. My income was high compared to most new law students, but not compared to their parents!  :D If you've been filing your own income taxes for (I believe it was) 5 years or more, they'll count you as independent.

2. Once you're here, the money issues don't exactly go away, but it's much easier than in UG. Michigan has a program for automatic $1000 short-term loans to cover emergencies, and our Fin Aid office is eminently understanding when things come up and we need more money.

3. Debt is scary, but I think that the new legislation will be a great equalizer (better income-sensitive repayments options; cancellation of principle after 10 years of public/gov't service). Hell, I will almost certainly be walking away from my biglaw offer to take a government job next fall on the strength of these new loan options. Anyway, I can't say enough about the options I've had coming from Michigan . . . worth a lot of debt, IMO.

13
General Board / Re: 2.0 - Should I drop out?
« on: January 20, 2009, 05:48:22 PM »
Two of my best friends went straight to law school after undergrad, hated it, and dropped out after a semester. One was doing very well (7th in her class after 1st semester), one was doing somewhat poorly. That was 10 or 11 years ago (yes, I'm Old) and they've both gone on to have lovely, fulfilling lives. Sure, paying the debt from a semester of expensive school that didn't end up yielding a degree sucked, but I don't believe that either has ever regretted the decision to pull the plug.

I personally think that that year or so after college is one of the more difficult in our lives. It's tempting to avoid the big questions by aimlessly continuing your education until answers, like, fall out of the sky or something. And frankly, that works for some people. For me, it made much more sense to just get out there and face it all.

14
Amen! I live about a mile and a half from the law quad and wouldn't trade it. I've stayed in the same lovely little house all three years. But I'm Old and persnickety, so ymmv.

15
No way, dude. I can assure you (as the person who ultimately has to make sure that everything is perfect for our journal) that we pay close attention to whose work is gold and whose is crap. It has a huge impact on everyone else down the editing chain.

Yes.

We also judge you if you ask dumb questions that were answered in earlier emails or in journal-specific documentation that you should have read.

I still heart you. You and Miss P are like my lost sisters in cyberspace.

16
No way, dude. I can assure you (as the person who ultimately has to make sure that everything is perfect for our journal) that we pay close attention to whose work is gold and whose is crap. It has a huge impact on everyone else down the editing chain.

17
General Board / Re: Having a pet while in law school - a problem?
« on: January 10, 2009, 11:36:44 AM »
I'm with MidWesternPleb. Law school keeps you busy, but it's not THAT bad. I'm a 3L who's made it this far with 2 big dogs and a cat. Before LS I was a grown up with a crazy job and 2 big dogs and 2 cats. Before that I was a graduate student with  2 big dogs and . . . well, you get the idea. When I worked in D.C. 1L summer they came with me, when I went home to NY for 2L summer they came with me (and I used some of that SA dough to hire a daily dog walker). There are always going to be hassles with being a pet owner whether you're working or going to school. It really comes down to knowing yourself and weighing the costs/benefits. 

18
3L job search / Re: Federal Government Honors Programs
« on: January 04, 2009, 09:22:23 AM »
I was told I might hear as early as Dec 26 through last week.  I know they called some of my references, but I still haven't heard from them :(

I wouldn't sweat it too much yet. Didn't they also say that they wanted to complete all hiring for the three programs in December? And they didn't even start interviewing until the beginning of the month. I'm trying to be all zen about the waiting game, but easier said than done.

19
3L job search / Re: Federal Government Honors Programs
« on: January 04, 2009, 12:42:35 AM »
Got a call last Thursday afternoon from one of the Regional Offices, wanting an interview the next morning  :o 

That seems to be how they roll! It's like, "Hi, we'd like to interview you . . . right now." Good luck to you, too!

Any update, Jolie?

Nada. Prolly won't hear anything until the end of the month/beginning of next month on either of them.

20
I just talked to a good friend of mine from college.  He's currently applying to MFA programs.  I was amazed by how little we had in common.  No jokes, no common interests.  He didn't even want to hear about my law school.  When I tried to talk about anything in the past, it felt terrible.  I ended up asking him a few awkward questions about his current life and hanging up.

Times like these make you doubt the very foundations of friendship. What do we really have in common with another human being? 

Does anyone ever have similar experiences?


No! I'm out of high school 15 years now, and my closest friends from back then are still among my closest friends today. I had the good fortune of making more amazing friends in college and have stayed close with all of them as well. Our lives have taken us in very different directions – literally, professionally, and personally – but we've stayed tight.

The funny thing is that between college and law school (~ 7 years) I only made a handful of 'keeper' friends. A few from work, a few from grad school . . . but there were a lot more amazing people I genuinely felt close to and then failed to keep in touch with. I suspect the law school friends are here for the long haul.

My experience has been almost exactly the same! 

And happy new year, Jolie! :)

Happy new year, Miss P.!

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