Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.

Messages - Esq

Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5 6 7 8 ... 14
21
Studying and Exam Taking / Re: Post Exam Behavior
« on: January 15, 2005, 01:50:37 PM »
However, when the Dean's List comes out, everyone will know how some people did...

22
Bar Exam / Re: Taking Two Bar Exams
« on: January 15, 2005, 09:40:45 AM »
If you want to find out what essay subjects are covered on a state bar exam, you can go to the Barbri website (www.barbri.com) and select the state that interests you.  For Indiana, the following topics are covered on the essays

Indiana Essay Subjects
Administrative Law, Agency, Commercial Law, Indiana Constitutional Law, Corporations, Family Law, Partnerships, Personal Property, Pleading and Practice, Taxation, Trusts & Estates, Wills

I would take several of these courses while in law school. It is probably not necessary to take all of them, but Barbri goes very fast. Barbri is really a "review." I never really bought into the "Barbri will teach you everything you need to know for the bar" line.  Barbri gives you three sets of outlines for each course. There is a big outline that is very detailed.  These outlines usually are 60 to 100 pages long.  They also give you a Conviser outline that is condensed down to around 20 pages.  They also give you the "fill in the blank" outlines for the lectures. Some people who haven't had the course in law school study from the big outline because it has examples and fact patterns in it. These examples help you to learn the material because you are probably encountering it for the first time. If you had the course in law school, you can generally study from the Conviser, or even the fill in the blank outline. These go much faster. The time you save allows you to spend more time on the MBE.

23
St. Marys / BAR CLASSES
« on: November 14, 2004, 02:39:06 PM »
v

24
St. Marys / BAR EXAM RATES RISE
« on: November 11, 2004, 10:18:53 PM »
SAN ANTONIO--St. Mary's University School of Law ("StMU-Law"), San Antonio's only ABA accredited law school, is generating renewed excitement among its students and alumni.  The results for the July 2004 Bar show the first-time taker Texas bar passage rates as follows: 1) UT Austin 92.04%  2) Baylor 91.92% 3) SMU 87.84% 4) UH 85.65% 5) Texas Tech 83.95% 6) St. Mary's 79.87% 7) South Texas 69.6%  Wesleyan 62.6% 9) Texas Southern 52.43% .

A concerted effort among StMU-LAW's alumni, students and the administration has raised the school bar passage rate to eighty percent, landing right at the demarcation point between schools above the statewide average and those below.  The school's plan to raise its scores is clearly working.  Coming in two years ahead of schedule, this key goal has already been achieved. All indications point to increased scores in the near future.

25
One correction to the post above concerning St. Mary's. If you take the last two administrations of the bar exam (July 2006 and February 2007) and add the total first-time takers of the bar exam and the total that passed it on the first try and express that number as a percentage for the bar passage rate, St. Mary's had an 82% bar passage rate. Alternatively, if you take the Feb 2006 and the July 2006 numbers to get a full year's worth of data for 2006, St. Mary's had an 84% bar passage rate for first-time takers.

26
Acceptances / Re: St. Mary's --- San Antonio
« on: February 17, 2007, 09:14:27 AM »
St. Mary’s University School of Law (“StMSL”) is part of a larger Catholic institution.  The University is the oldest Catholic university in the Southwest. 

StMSL students and faculty have reasons to be proud of their contributions to the legal community. In the last few years, a team from St. Mary’s University won the Texas Young Lawyers Association Moot Court Competition at the State Bar Convention in Austin, the most prestigious advocacy competition in the State of Texas. St. Mary's Law Review is consistently ranked as one of the top ten in the nation among all U.S. law schools in the number of times courts have cited the Journal. 

On the national front, the U.S. Congress has appropriated funds for StMLS to study amending the Freedom of Information Act in light of terrorist threats to government functions. The Princeton Review recently recognized the School of Law in a student survey of the Best 159 Law Schools, citing such qualities as St. Mary’s School of Law’s administration, effective teaching techniques, an emphasis on clinical programs, writing and research, and the potential for clerkships and internships.

Since 2003, the bar passage rate has consistently been at or above the state average. In the 2006 July administration, 84% of St Mary's students passed on the first attempt. 

In the Spring of 2004, school officials inaugurated a research center on terrorism law, accompanied by several dignitaries, including U.S. Sen. John Cornyn, a St. Mary's law school graduate. StMSL has also integrated technology into its classrooms and with the new courtroom, StMSL  hopes to partner with the Supreme Court of the state of Texas on a number of important technology issues.  StMSL has attracted high-profile visiting judges to teach at the law school. StMSL conducts classes at its Institute on World Legal Problems in Austria.  In previous years, the Institute has had such distinguished visiting jurists as Chief Justice William Rehnquist who taught on the Supreme Court in United States History. In fact, the former Chief Justice, only a month before he passed away, recognized the work of a St. Mary's professor for the professor's contribution to the federal rules.


 

27
Reviews, Visits, and Rankings / Re: St. Mary's School of Law
« on: January 06, 2007, 02:50:11 PM »
St. Mary’s University School of Law (“StMSL”) is part of a larger Catholic institution.  The University is the oldest Catholic university in the Southwest. 

StMSL students and faculty have reasons to be proud of their contributions to the legal community. A team from St. Mary’s University recently won the Texas Young Lawyers Association Moot Court Competition at the State Bar Convention in Austin, the most prestigious advocacy competition in the State of Texas.

Large law firms recruit on the St. Mary's law school campus.

St. Mary's Law Review is ranked third in the nation among all U.S. law schools in the number of times courts have cited the Journal.  The U.S. Congress has appropriated funds for StMLS to study amending the Freedom of Information Act in light of terrorist threats to government functions.

The Princeton Review recently recognized the School of Law in a student survey of the Best 159 Law Schools, citing such qualities as St. Mary’s School of Law’s administration, effective teaching techniques, an emphasis on clinical programs, writing and research, and the potential for clerkships and internships.

The school's bar passage rate has been at or near the state average pass rate for most of the decade.

The school has a research center on terrorism law, one of the first in the nation. U.S. Sen. John Cornyn is a St. Mary's law school graduate.

StMSL has also integrated technology into its classrooms and with the new courtroom, StMSL  hopes to partner with the Supreme Court of the state of Texas on a number of important technology issues.

StMSL has attracted high-profile visiting judges to teach at the law school. StMSL conducts classes at its Institute on World Legal Problems in Austria.  In previous years, the Institute has had such distinguished visiting jurists as Chief Justice William Rehnquist who taught on the Supreme Court in United States History. In fact, the former Chief Justice, only a month before he passed away, recognized the work of a St. Mary's professor for the professor's contribution to the federal rules. 







28
Where should I go next fall? / Re: what if I WANT to go to a T3/T4....
« on: November 11, 2006, 09:24:59 AM »
I agree that in some situations, regional reputations can carry the day for job opportunities within the region.

But it also seems that schools with regional reputations are more susceptible to short-term downturns in factors such as bar passage rates. Schools with national reputations are better able to simply "ride on their reputation", even if recent events don't jibe with the reputation.

With all that said, I hope that a school with a regional reputation will be able to ride through the changes that come with a change in management at the top. I suspect that changes at the top of a school with a national reputation might not mean as much as they do with smaller, regional schools. Changing horses in mid-stream must always be done with a great deal of caution.





29
General Off-Topic Board / Re: Distressing WSJ Article
« on: June 24, 2006, 06:27:29 PM »
Turning back to the original topic for a moment, Stacher's Wall Street Journal article attempts to make a few points.

He writes that 40,000 new lawyers are minted every year. But large law firms lose 40 percent of their associates within four years. Furthermore, 42 percent of lawyers in smaller firms switch firms after three years.

Those statistics do raise some concerns, but at this point, Stracher makes a leap. Stracher writes: "While many go to other law firms, or into other legal jobs, such as in-house counsel at corporations, anecdotal evidence shows that a significant percentage drop out of the legal profession entirely."

What is his anecdotal evidence? Two of his closest friends (presumably these friends were lawyers) are now mothers choosing to stay at home. Another friend of his has become an actor. Another friend is a screenwriter and several are novelists. Then he quotes one commercial firm's director for the following, "The buzz now is lawyers getting three years of experience at a big firm, then going off and doing something entirely unrelated to the law... ."

Stracher then writes,

"The legal profession is really two professions: the elite lawyers and everyone else. Most of the former start out at big law firms. Many of the latter never find gainful legal employment. Instead, they work at jobs that might be characterized as "quasi-legal": paralegals, clerks, administrators, doing work for which they probably never needed a J.D."

It's a rather sweeping statement.  But he doesn't really have any statistics for what constitutes "many of the latter never find gainful legal employment" and admits that "hard data about the nature of these jobs is difficult to come by."

Stracher thinks that lawyers need to do a better job of communicating to others outside the profession that most lawyers don't earn $160,000 a year. OK, I would agree with that proposition.  Also, lawyers should let the world in on the fact that rock star-lawyer lunches do not happen.  You know, I've never heard this rock star lunch expectation from anyone wanting to go to law school. If I do, I'll be sure to disabuse them of that notion. Apparently, he never meets people interested in studying the law for the sake of learning. He doesn't devote any discussion to the fact that the law degree is still a rich and versatile degree.   

Stracher says he is annually surprised by students who believe a J.D. is "a ticket to fame, fortune and the envy of one's peers -- a sure ticket to the upper middle class." He faults the "system" that "makes a whole lot of people pay a whole lot of money for jobs that are not worth it, or that have no future." 

I think law school debt is a problem. There are a lot of unrealistic expectations out there.  But there are still a lot of reasons to go to law school. Stracher doesn't really have enough facts in his article to support his sweeping conclusions. He covers a lot of ground in his article and all his pessimism gets jumbled up with the facts.  His solution is to just sweep it all under the rug. 

 
 


 

30
Law School Applications / Re: Texas Tech Fall 2006
« on: May 13, 2006, 09:18:05 AM »
The Krud has misrepresented by resume. I've never been a mole in any admissions office. And the poster above, Gujuguy, mentioned Professor Beyer who has taught at more than four law schools across the country.

Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5 6 7 8 ... 14