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11
Current Law Students / Re: Is PMBR necessary????
« on: May 28, 2005, 07:47:37 AM »
For what it's worth, I think PMBR is worth it. 

You will never run out of practice MBE questions if you take PMBR.  If the extra money is a real problem, you can buy just the PMBR three day session and you get all the essential books (the blue book and the red book of questions) as if you purchased the 9 day package. (It's 9 days because of the 6 day warm up prior to Barbri classes and then the same 3 day session after Barbri ends). If you take just the 3 day session, it is less expensive and you still get the benefit of a simulated MBE exam under timed conditions in a room full of other highly stressed individuals.  With the Barbri simulated MBE and the PMBR simulated MBE you will have a good idea of how you react on "game day."  I think those two practice tests really help control your nerves and give you the confidence when you start to hit that "wall" around question 120 or so on the MBE.

One more point about class standing.  Although statistically, it's true that a higher law school GPA has some predictor value as far as one's chances of passing the bar on the first attempt, never forget that it's a "flukey" test.  There're always a few stories about individuals who were highly ranked and for one reason or another, those individuals failed the bar on the first attempt.  I think the best way to approach the bar exam is to study hard and prepare by working old essay questions, using the barbri schedule, taking PMBR, and just hitting it very, very hard.  You might as well go into the test with every possible advantage.

12
Current Law Students / Re: Headed for a tragic future?
« on: February 05, 2005, 03:53:47 PM »
Tragic future? This thread seems a little melodramatic. I also think this "stigma" talk of attending a "T4" is a little over the top as well.

Here's a stigma story: I have a friend who graduated from a "T4" school. He got a job out of lawschool with the state supreme court working for a justice as a briefing attorney. The other justices also had briefing attorneys and it just so happened that most of the other briefing attorneys graduated from a "T1" school. There were a few "T2" schools represented as well. My friend was the only one from a "T4" school, but he did not let this bother him. However, for about two months all of them were awaiting their bar exam results. When the pass list came out, the Court Clerk brought it into the room where they all were and they had a chance to see it before the list was officially published.  They all rushed the Court Clerk and almost snatched the list out of the clerk's hands. People were crowding in a huddle, tearing through the pages, reading off names, and then shouting out thanks to their various gods when they found their names. All of them passed, except for one. The one that did not pass merely hung his head, cursed, and walked out of the room. The room turned quiet. They all knew what had happened. Slowly, they all filtered out of the room, took the rest of the afternoon off, and went home to their families. My "T4" friend's name had been on the list. He knew that day he had become an attorney, subject to being sworn in. He is proud of his school. He is working for a law firm. He has never been "stigmatized."


13
Current Law Students / Re: Baby Bar
« on: February 05, 2005, 06:58:38 AM »
How does the Baby Bar work? I have heard that it is given to all first year law school students in California. Who administers the exam? What is its format? What subjects does it test?

14
Current Law Students / Re: Mutiple Choice - shoot me now.
« on: February 05, 2005, 06:55:32 AM »
One point about using the PMBR questions to study for a law school Evidence test.  The PMBR questions are geared for the Multistate Bar Exam ("MBE").  Of the six topics on the MBE, the Evidence questions are generally regarded as the most "tricky." Also, the PMBR practice questions only test on the Federal Rules of Evidence because the MBE only tests on the Federal Rules of Evidence. I do believe the PMBR practice questions are essential for studying for the MBE portion of the bar exam; however, if you only worked 50 or 100 evidence questions for a law school exam and found yourself getting 30 percent right, that would not be unusual because most people who start using the PMBR questions to study for the bar exam do not do better than 40 percent correct on the Evidence questions in the first few weeks of study. PMBR recommends that you do 50 MBE questions a day, every day, while studying for the bar exam. It takes this much practice because all the questions on the MBE are tricky but the the Evidence questions are very tricky.
 

15
The Examples and Explanations Series is great. The E&E Glannon Civ Pro book is essential. E&E's Contracts by Brian Blum is clearly written and has great hypos. I liked E&E's Secured Transactions and Payment Systems books. The E&E Wills and Trusts book by Beyer is excellent and I highly recommend it. All the E&E books are great.

I agree with what was said above about the "Nutshell" series. 

16
Current Law Students / Re: Post Exam Behavior
« on: January 15, 2005, 11:50:37 AM »
However, when the Dean's List comes out, everyone will know how some people did...

17
Bar Exam Preparation / Re: Taking Two Bar Exams
« on: January 15, 2005, 07:40:45 AM »
If you want to find out what essay subjects are covered on a state bar exam, you can go to the Barbri website (www.barbri.com) and select the state that interests you.  For Indiana, the following topics are covered on the essays

Indiana Essay Subjects
Administrative Law, Agency, Commercial Law, Indiana Constitutional Law, Corporations, Family Law, Partnerships, Personal Property, Pleading and Practice, Taxation, Trusts & Estates, Wills

I would take several of these courses while in law school. It is probably not necessary to take all of them, but Barbri goes very fast. Barbri is really a "review." I never really bought into the "Barbri will teach you everything you need to know for the bar" line.  Barbri gives you three sets of outlines for each course. There is a big outline that is very detailed.  These outlines usually are 60 to 100 pages long.  They also give you a Conviser outline that is condensed down to around 20 pages.  They also give you the "fill in the blank" outlines for the lectures. Some people who haven't had the course in law school study from the big outline because it has examples and fact patterns in it. These examples help you to learn the material because you are probably encountering it for the first time. If you had the course in law school, you can generally study from the Conviser, or even the fill in the blank outline. These go much faster. The time you save allows you to spend more time on the MBE.

18
One correction to the post above concerning St. Mary's. If you take the last two administrations of the bar exam (July 2006 and February 2007) and add the total first-time takers of the bar exam and the total that passed it on the first try and express that number as a percentage for the bar passage rate, St. Mary's had an 82% bar passage rate. Alternatively, if you take the Feb 2006 and the July 2006 numbers to get a full year's worth of data for 2006, St. Mary's had an 84% bar passage rate for first-time takers.

19
Acceptances, Denials, and Waitlists / Re: St. Mary's --- San Antonio
« on: February 17, 2007, 07:14:27 AM »
St. Mary’s University School of Law (“StMSL”) is part of a larger Catholic institution.  The University is the oldest Catholic university in the Southwest. 

StMSL students and faculty have reasons to be proud of their contributions to the legal community. In the last few years, a team from St. Mary’s University won the Texas Young Lawyers Association Moot Court Competition at the State Bar Convention in Austin, the most prestigious advocacy competition in the State of Texas. St. Mary's Law Review is consistently ranked as one of the top ten in the nation among all U.S. law schools in the number of times courts have cited the Journal. 

On the national front, the U.S. Congress has appropriated funds for StMLS to study amending the Freedom of Information Act in light of terrorist threats to government functions. The Princeton Review recently recognized the School of Law in a student survey of the Best 159 Law Schools, citing such qualities as St. Mary’s School of Law’s administration, effective teaching techniques, an emphasis on clinical programs, writing and research, and the potential for clerkships and internships.

Since 2003, the bar passage rate has consistently been at or above the state average. In the 2006 July administration, 84% of St Mary's students passed on the first attempt. 

In the Spring of 2004, school officials inaugurated a research center on terrorism law, accompanied by several dignitaries, including U.S. Sen. John Cornyn, a St. Mary's law school graduate. StMSL has also integrated technology into its classrooms and with the new courtroom, StMSL  hopes to partner with the Supreme Court of the state of Texas on a number of important technology issues.  StMSL has attracted high-profile visiting judges to teach at the law school. StMSL conducts classes at its Institute on World Legal Problems in Austria.  In previous years, the Institute has had such distinguished visiting jurists as Chief Justice William Rehnquist who taught on the Supreme Court in United States History. In fact, the former Chief Justice, only a month before he passed away, recognized the work of a St. Mary's professor for the professor's contribution to the federal rules.


 

20
Visits, Admit Days, and Open Houses / Re: St. Mary's School of Law
« on: January 06, 2007, 12:50:11 PM »
St. Mary’s University School of Law (“StMSL”) is part of a larger Catholic institution.  The University is the oldest Catholic university in the Southwest. 

StMSL students and faculty have reasons to be proud of their contributions to the legal community. A team from St. Mary’s University recently won the Texas Young Lawyers Association Moot Court Competition at the State Bar Convention in Austin, the most prestigious advocacy competition in the State of Texas.

Large law firms recruit on the St. Mary's law school campus.

St. Mary's Law Review is ranked third in the nation among all U.S. law schools in the number of times courts have cited the Journal.  The U.S. Congress has appropriated funds for StMLS to study amending the Freedom of Information Act in light of terrorist threats to government functions.

The Princeton Review recently recognized the School of Law in a student survey of the Best 159 Law Schools, citing such qualities as St. Mary’s School of Law’s administration, effective teaching techniques, an emphasis on clinical programs, writing and research, and the potential for clerkships and internships.

The school's bar passage rate has been at or near the state average pass rate for most of the decade.

The school has a research center on terrorism law, one of the first in the nation. U.S. Sen. John Cornyn is a St. Mary's law school graduate.

StMSL has also integrated technology into its classrooms and with the new courtroom, StMSL  hopes to partner with the Supreme Court of the state of Texas on a number of important technology issues.

StMSL has attracted high-profile visiting judges to teach at the law school. StMSL conducts classes at its Institute on World Legal Problems in Austria.  In previous years, the Institute has had such distinguished visiting jurists as Chief Justice William Rehnquist who taught on the Supreme Court in United States History. In fact, the former Chief Justice, only a month before he passed away, recognized the work of a St. Mary's professor for the professor's contribution to the federal rules. 







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