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Messages - lyrarain

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1
General Board / Help! How Do You Address Your Law Professor In Email?
« on: September 14, 2005, 04:43:54 PM »
I am having an email conversation with a law professor I haven't personally interacted with and don't know if I should write "Dear Professor Lastname" every time or "Hi Dr. Lastname"--is it appropriate to call law professors "doctor"?

My professor signs emails firstname lastname like a normal person, but in class we are all Mr. This and Ms. That. I am not sure what to do, and don't trust my instincts since I did undergrad on a firstname basis with everyone.

Help?! What do you all do when emailing back and forth (I am setting up conference panel & inquiring about joint degree stuff, not arranging to do work for him).

2
General Board / Re: Question Re: Reading Casebooks
« on: September 05, 2005, 01:27:31 PM »
I've been making notes in the book when I get time, if the hypos seem tricky, but not if they're stupid. The amount of time it takes to do all the reading has been wearing down on my sleep, so I've switched to reading the notes first in my books that have good notes, since that helps me whiz through the case better, and I skim the E&E for the confusing ones before I do that section in the case book. sometimes I take more notes from E&E than my casebook, because they lay things out more plainly there. It's kind of a bummer though, because it seems I can either get to class having done all this reading and be bored while everyone else tries to get a handle on things, or I can lay off the careful studying and feel a little panicky in class. I guess we find the balance eventually...


3
I hate my Contracts book! It leads me into blind alleys and then says, "Whoops, blind alley. Fooled you!" I despise this pedagogical method (it is in stark contrast to all my other textbooks) and  I strongly desire a resource that can help me understand the contorted logic behind the use of these cases.

Can someone recommend really good resources for understanding Contracts doctrines?

Can someone else using the Kraus and Scott book Contract Law and Theory, which, thank god for all of the rest of you, is rarely used, recommend keyed guides with case briefs that have helped? I am not optimistic here because it is not a common book and there may be no keyed study guides.

Thanks for help!

4
U of California - Los Angeles / Public Interest Program?
« on: April 15, 2005, 07:36:40 PM »
I am in at UCLA's public interest program and wondering hard about how it compares to UVA, NYU, Georgetown, or Penn. I know I want to do public interest, and I'm pretty sure I want to do it in the Bay Area, or at least California. I love the Pacific, and sunlight generally. I think I'll have to find out what public interest area specifically in school.

So, how does UCLA's program stack up to a degree from those other schools when it comes time to interview? Will it be easier to get a job in California with a UCLA public interest degree?

In: UCLA, USC, UVA, GW (nah!), UCDavis (if their LRAP were better...)
Wait: Cornell, Michigan
Pending: Harvard, NYU, Penn, Georgetown (they've decided; it's in the mail!)
Numbers 173/164/cancel; 3.52

5
General board for soon-to-be 1Ls / Re: UVA Bound Thread
« on: September 02, 2005, 07:36:40 AM »
Things I've realized lately at University of Virginia:

1. Yes, it's true, your private loan money doesn't get here until a week after classes start, and then you have to go endorse the check and wait another 7-10 business days for it to go into your bank account (but it helps to set up direct deposit).

2. Most of the students are really nice. I already cried one time when I was sleep deprived and unprepared for two classes, and a guy in my section gave me a cigarette, even though I haven't been particularly friendly to my section.

3. Yes, it's very fratty, including a hazing event. I'm a non-drinker (yay for non-drinkers) and tend to be uncomfortable at big parties, so I'm skipping most of that stuff. I'm also living away from the apartments most law students live in, which is more relaxing for me but others might see it as antisocial.

4. You get about half and half from your professors. Some are adorable and interesting, some are tedious and confusing. You get free money to take the fun ones out to lunch. None of mine do anything cruel to the students; if you've done the reading they just try to coax the answer they're looking for out of you. The general attitude at UVA is one of wanting the students to succeed, which leads to the next:

5. The average grade is a B+. This is very reassuring. It means you have to work at it to fail.

6. I have a friend at Georgetown, and she tells me GULC's sections are huge, like three times the size of ours, and she doesn't know anyone and finds it really hard to make friends. Neither of us made that a big issue when choosing, but I would now. I'm usually less sociable than she is,  but I have a few friends and am amiable with the others in my section. virginia's small section size makes it really easy to get to know people.

7. On the other hand, my friend at GULC has four classes, while I have five. I have 16 hours of class, and I spend an amount of time I'm ashamed to disclose on the reading. If you're a compulsively detailed but kinda ADD reader who has been out of school a while, be prepared to spend a long, long time. Longer than you thought when you thought it would be long. I'm told this will get better.

8. If you speak spanish there's a pretty cool migrant farmworker pro bono project you can get involved with immediately. If you don't speak Spanish you can audit the class for free on the regular campus (though probably you won't want to during 1L). There's also a public interest conference and other good stuff, and a lot of it's still forming which means it's easy to get involved.


6
So, I think there is a place where we can specify direct deposit info to get our loan money faster--now, who knows where it is? I have blundered around ISIS and LawWeb and haven't found it. I think I got a piece of paper once upon a time that gave a url but I can't find it (or anything).

7
General board for soon-to-be 1Ls / Re: UVA Bound Thread
« on: August 06, 2005, 02:29:15 AM »
From all I've been able to find out, it looks as if those of us getting law loans for living expenses shouldn't count on seeing the surplus refunded before at least the second week of September. I've got just enough savings to scrape rent up till then, but for the rest I'm getting by with no interest credit cards. I highly recommend them as a short term means of preserving the contents of one's checking account, but you have to pay the monthly amounts faithfully or you'll lose that zero interest status. As far as money for books goes, do we *really* need to buy those before October? Books. Bah.

I throw up my hands about the money-- honestly my main concern right now is figuring out where the good swimmin' holes are. I think I'm going to check out Blue Hole, except I'm intimidated by any kind of hike in this heat. I wonder, is the section of the Rivanna that runs through town really nice enough to swim in? That water is barely moving and I suspect it of harboring leaches, but I guess anything is better than chlorine.

8
General board for soon-to-be 1Ls / Re: UVA Bound Thread
« on: June 24, 2005, 03:09:33 PM »
I posted this to a health insurance thread I'm following, but I thought if any UVA students are, like me, stressing about whether to go with Chickering or strike out on their own and find a different health option, it might be useful:

I've started my research with the Chickering Group's plan at UVA. It covers all kinds of stuff for dependents that doesn't really apply to me, so I'm wondering if a sparser plan elsewhere might be more cost effective.

Chickering's UVA policy has a $1600 premium, and there's a $150 deductable, and after you've met that the plan will cover 90% of most doctor visits and 80% of lab fees. You pay the other 10% or 20% as the case may be, and that is called "co-insurance." The plan will pay for that stuff at 100% once you've paid $1,500 in "co-insurance," but co-pays, the $150 deductable, amounts you have to pay because it was above what chickering deemed "reasonable charges"--all that stuff doesn't count toward the $1,500. Basically you can only get there by adding up your personal 10% of doctor visits and 20% of lab fees. Co-pays are generally $20. http://www.chickering.com/stu_conn/student_connection.aspx?group_number=812806

For prescriptions you have a $100 deductable, and after you've paid that out it's a $10 copay for generic and a $30 for brand drugs.

I think they want most people just to use campus health services: "Student Health professional services are covered by your student activity fee. This means there is no charge for your visit with a Student Health provider (e.g. Physician, nurse practitioner, mental health clinician, or health educator).  Unless otherwise noted, ancillary services (e.g. lab tests) received at Student Health or ordered by a Student Health provider will be covered at 100% without application of a Copay or Deductible. Ancillary Services provided at Student Health include, but are not limited to:
Immunizations
Injectable Medications (except contraceptives, which are covered under the Student Health
Insurance Plan)
Medical Supplies & Services
Laboratory Tests"

Chickering's UVA policy does cover contraceptives including the ring.

You can optionally get separate dental with Concordia for $150 premium with a $50 deductable and a $750 annual payout limit. This is only worth it if you might have cavities, but I had seven this year so I'll probably do it. The plan considers posterior composite fillings (the tooth colored ones that look normal) to be "alternative" which means it will only pay as much as if you got the amalgam (the dirty looking silver fillings that take a huge chunk out of your tooth).
http://www.chickering.com/stu_conn/student_connection.aspx?group_number=812806

I am going to go see what Blue Cross/Blue Shield can offer me.

9
I've started my reserach with the Chickering Group's plan at UVA. It covers all kinds of stuff for dependents that doesn't really apply to me, so I'm wondering if a sparser plan elsewhere might be more cost effective.

Chickering's UVA policy has a $1600 premium, and there's a $150 deductable, and after you've met that the plan will cover 90% of most doctor visits and 80% of lab fees. You pay the other 10% or 20% as the case may be, and that is called "co-insurance." The plan will pay for that stuff at 100% once you've paid $1,500 in "co-insurance," but co-pays, the $150 deductable, amounts you have to pay because it was above what chickering deemed "reasonable charges--all that stuff doesn't count toward the $1,500. Basically you can only get there by adding up your personal 10% of doctor visits and 20% of lab fees. http://www.chickering.com/stu_conn/student_connection.aspx?group_number=812806

I think they want most people just to use campus health services: "Student Health professional services are covered by your student activity fee. This means there is no charge for your visit with a Student Health provider (e.g. Physician, nurse practitioner, mental health clinician, or health educator).  Unless otherwise noted, ancillary services (e.g. lab tests) received at Student Health or ordered by a Student Health provider will be covered at 100% without application of a Copay or Deductible. Ancillary Services provided at Student Health include, but are not limited to:
Immunizations
Injectable Medications (except contraceptives, which are covered under the Student Health
Insurance Plan)
Medical Supplies & Services
Laboratory Tests"

Chickering's UVA policy does cover contraceptives including the ring.

You can optionally get separate dental with Concordia for $150 premium with a $50 deductable and a $750 annual payout limit. This is only worth it if you might have cavities, but I had seven this year so I'll probably do it. The plan considers posterior composite fillings (the tooth colored ones that look normal) to be "alternative" which means it will only pay as much as if you got the amalgam (the dirty looking silver fillings that take a huge chunk out of your tooth).
http://www.chickering.com/stu_conn/student_connection.aspx?group_number=812806

I am going to go see what Blue Cross/Blue Shield can offer me. (cross posted to UVA thread)

10
General board for soon-to-be 1Ls / Telephone/ High Speed Internet?
« on: June 23, 2005, 07:26:04 PM »
What all phone/high speed service is everyone going with?

I am currently picking between Sprint and NTelos for phone and NTelos DSL and Adelphia cable for Internet. After two calls I already hate Sprint and am extremely dubious about their ability to function as a company. I have heard Adelphia has frequent network outages, but they do offer a wireless router with their service and they have a six month intro offer that is the cheapest for the speed you get. NTelos requires a year contract which offends me on principal.

I never thought I'd see the day when Qwest communications services seemed good in comparison to something, but that day has arrived!

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