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Messages - aryels

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41
Black Law Student Discussion Board / Re: Missing White Female Alert
« on: June 05, 2005, 12:57:14 PM »


Part of this has to do with the fact that many of the media decision-makers are white men who somehow relate to these women as being their wives, daughters or sisters.

It is simply the reality that white media executives, based on their view of the world, react differently to the cases of whites than minorities.


Well, yes. It probably does have something to do with representation. Not long ago, I heard a class presentation given by a black girl, who was concerned about the ratio of unemployed blacks versus unemployed whites--until she made the realization of the difference of education levels. Since the ratio of most minorities with post-secondary education is not as high as that of whites, it follows that those with mass media education would include a higher ratio of whites, whose frame of reference includes other whites. Same as the Government, which if anyone is noticing, is becoming more diverse as minorities receive more education.

42
Where should I go next fall? / Re: Why is everyone's GPA so high?
« on: May 22, 2005, 09:17:20 PM »
Areyls - sounds like you've known for a while that law school is for you.  Why have you chosen accounting as your major?  Are you planning the tax attorney route or just interested in the corporate practice?  And how many years has it been since your high-IQ high school days?

 :)
Ah, a very long story. I have had some interesting email and phone conversations with a relatively well-known 'New Yoik' lawyer who was sort of the inspiration for studying law. He defends some very controversial characters, and seems very interested in protecting the rights of his clients. Thus, considering my locality, I studied for my paralegal degree, which led to my desire to attain a JD.

During one of my early courses, I had to complete an assignment of finding and reporting on a firm where I would like to work; while searching the yellow pages, I found the perfect firm. The two lawyers have degrees of JD, LLM Taxation, LLM International Law, and JD, MBA, LLM International Law, respectively. They are a couple of really impressive guys--(former prosecutors)-- who specialize in International Business and Trade, Corporate Taxation, and other really fascinating areas such as Foreign Corrupt Practices, Anti-trust law, etc. They practice at state, federal and tax courts at Washington D.C., New York, Chicago, Indianapolis, and the local area. I am in total awe of them.

When I began reading West Federal Taxation (corporations, etc) I was really anxious to learn more, and accounting seemed the most plausible way of learning what I need to know-- since a corporate tax attorney (or an enrolled agent) should be able to understand the recordkeeping procedures of a company which it represents in court.
I recently wrote some fantastic papers about the OECD/global taxation and the Sarbanes-Oxley Act.(*For some reason, I find the law approach to my courses as more interesting.)

High school sometimes seems very long ago, and at other times it doesn't.



My fascination with law is along the same lines.  However, I don't see myself going into the tax field - more so corporate transaction or corporate litigation.  I currently work for a Big Four public accounting firm and during IPO engagements, I would always look wistfully at the lawyer team.  During college, I ended with a major in accounting because (1) it was the most challenging major in the UG business school (the major's average GPA was 1.89) and (2) it was the most practical major (irt to jobs, corporate and client exposure, and the like).  And as they say, you can always go from accounting to finance, but not from finance to accounting.

I've worked on endless SOX engagement and they are brutual - clients certainly don't enjoy the necessary compliances.  It'll be interesting to see how the public will, in the future as SOX develops, perceive an adverse or qualified opinion on SOX controls.

Well, I haven't totally decided upon the tax route, but it is a very strong possibility. I enjoy that the IRS is completely amoral, meaning that people are not judged according to their beliefs, lifestyles or past behavior (unless it concerns taxes). Another reason why I decided upon Accounting is because I read somewhere that if a person really wants to know how a business works, study accounting, not business administration.

Anyway, I have registered for some more tax courses starting next month, so that I can work during the 2005 tax season. I learn so much, not only about tax law, but also about business and financial planning.

I know from writing the SOX paper that some companies are struggling with compliance, and that there have been  extensions and some discussion about softening regulations. However, the biggest complaint is about the cost of compliance, since some companies are spending millions of dollars to initiate compliance procedures. I consider SOX as necessary regulations. I think auditing would be very fun. ;D

43
Where should I go next fall? / Re: Why is everyone's GPA so high?
« on: May 22, 2005, 05:35:39 PM »
Areyls - sounds like you've known for a while that law school is for you.  Why have you chosen accounting as your major?  Are you planning the tax attorney route or just interested in the corporate practice?  And how many years has it been since your high-IQ high school days?

 :)
Ah, a very long story. I have had some interesting email and phone conversations with a relatively well-known 'New Yoik' lawyer who was sort of the inspiration for studying law. He defends some very controversial characters, and seems very interested in protecting the rights of his clients. Thus, considering my locality, I studied for my paralegal degree, which led to my desire to attain a JD.

During one of my early courses, I had to complete an assignment of finding and reporting on a firm where I would like to work; while searching the yellow pages, I found the perfect firm. The two lawyers have degrees of JD, LLM Taxation, LLM International Law, and JD, MBA, LLM International Law, respectively. They are a couple of really impressive guys--(former prosecutors)-- who specialize in International Business and Trade, Corporate Taxation, and other really fascinating areas such as Foreign Corrupt Practices, Anti-trust law, etc. They practice at state, federal and tax courts at Washington D.C., New York, Chicago, Indianapolis, and the local area. I am in total awe of them.

When I began reading West Federal Taxation (corporations, etc) I was really anxious to learn more, and accounting seemed the most plausible way of learning what I need to know-- since a corporate tax attorney (or an enrolled agent) should be able to understand the recordkeeping procedures of a company which it represents in court.
I recently wrote some fantastic papers about the OECD/global taxation and the Sarbanes-Oxley Act.(*For some reason, I find the law approach to my courses as more interesting.)

High school sometimes seems very long ago, and at other times it doesn't.


44
Where should I go next fall? / Re: Why is everyone's GPA so high?
« on: May 22, 2005, 07:43:46 AM »





AS Paralegal with a 3.92.


Sounds like you have a wonderful life.

On another note, here are several reasons this forum and LSN are cluttered with rediculously high GPAs:

a) people lie
b) pathetic majors
c) pathetic colleges
d) people lie
e) oh, and pathetic majors

I think that sums it up.

Ah, the 3.92 was my final score for the AS paralegal; I maintained the high GPA while also studying tax courses.

My 4.0 is at a different university for BS Accounting, however the course I am presently studying isn't required unless I continue for a MS.
Neither university provides the option of choosing instructors, unless in the instance of choosing an elective.

Anyway, my circumstances are not the same as when studying for the AS. I am sure it will make a difference.

45
Where should I go next fall? / Re: Why is everyone's GPA so high?
« on: May 19, 2005, 07:55:26 PM »
Yes, I realize that I need some kind of a social life. And a seat at the front of the class is not totally advantageous if the instructor frequently walks around the classroom.

And the front seat makes it difficult to determine if the guy sitting in the rear of the class is staring, smiling and making faces at me or at the presentation screen.

(struggling to maintain a 4.0)

46
General Off-Topic Board / Re: What besides Courtroom Law?
« on: April 29, 2005, 09:08:49 AM »
"other types of lawyer jobs"?  :) to name a few:

Bankruptcy, Contracts, Probate, Personal Injury, Administrative Law, Corporate Law, Tax Law,
Torts, Health Care, Family, Marriage, Divorce, Custody and Elder Law, Disability, Immigration, Civil and Human Rights, Employment and Labor, Intellectual Property, Real Estate and Property, Communications, Environmental, Securities, Insurance, Privacy, Banking, Commercial, Constitutional, Native American, International--human rights, trade, etc., Sports and Entertainment, Products Liability, Weather Related, Military, Foreign Relations, Patent and Trademark, White Collar, Consumer, Sales, ADR--

It stands to reason that the salary of any lawyers varies according to the amount of experience, the locality of his practice, and the demand for his/her specialty. Lawyers' fees are determined by level--a lawyer who has been practicing for a number of years has the right to charge a significantly larger amount for his/her services; lawyer's rates vary from state to state (see salary.com). And for instance, a real estate lawyer would have more success in an area of the country where there are larger number of real estate transactions and disputes, such as urban areas.


47
Non-Traditional Students / Re: FBI
« on: April 18, 2005, 07:44:11 AM »
Yes, the FBI is a great bunch of people. I've worked at a security co. which requires extensive testing and a 30 page application; (many of the security companies are operated by ex-FBI agents). I can imagine the application process for the FBI is much more fun. Be sure to check your answers, because the FBI definitely will.

Thank goodness my accounting major and my age doesn't eliminate my chances of working there. :)


"What protections are provided by the FBI's Office of Equal Employment Opportunity Affairs?
The role of the Office of Equal Employment Opportunity Affairs is to provide equal opportunity in employment for all persons; to prohibit discrimination in employment because of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, sexual orientation, or handicap; and to promote the full realization of equal employment opportunity through a continuing affirmative action program."

https://www.fbijobs.com/

48
General Off-Topic Board / Re: Hi / Why do you want to go into Law?
« on: April 17, 2005, 03:28:07 PM »
I've been lurking LSD off/on for a little bit, and it seems like a good board with lots of info. Anway, I thought I'd start my first post with a question and say hi.

Why are you trying to get into Law?


Because the practice of law alleviates the cravings of chocolate and sex.

"I don't want to break the law; I want to fix it."--aryelslynxus, 2005

49
SIS?

Have I mentioned my lawyers?

50
Law School Applications / Re: What is "international law"?
« on: March 23, 2005, 08:22:05 AM »
Exactly what is it people are referring to when they say they want to do international law?  Are they talking about something like prosecuting war crimes at the Hague?  International Court of Justice stuff?  I'd imagine international corporations falls under typical corporate stuff, and I'm sure maritime law can fall under this category as well, along with jurisdiction over various things etc.  But all of this seems to fall under more specific categories...so what exactly is international law?

I would have to say that the others did a good job at describing International Law, however there are a few more words which should be said. If you were to look at the curriculums and programs of various law schools, you would see that many of them include international law courses, such as international criminal law (yes, the Hague), international business law, international tax law, international human rights law, comparative law --and others which aren't deemed as international law--such as WTO, EU, foreign investments, anti-dumping, treaties. etc.

Globalization has a big impact on the US. I have read that in the near future, lawyers will almost certainly have to study and practice international law, since the laws of the various nations are becoming more uniform. I have observed the implementation of international law during a court hearing when a judge who declared he would place a phone call to the suspect's native country for a criminal history report--thus communication between various nations has become an important tool of the court system.

Many of the undergrad universities are offering international business courses, because it is an important aspect of today's business world. And international business requires the understanding of foreign cultures, religions, laws and business practices.  Thus, the increase of lawyers practicing international law.

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