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Messages - JonR0921

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41
Law School Admissions / Hofstra
« on: March 24, 2005, 09:41:48 AM »
I notice that so many people talk about Hofstra, and its proximity to New York City.  As someone who has a long history with Hofstra, allow me to clarify.  Hofstra is accessible to NYC via the Long Island Railroad (LIRR).  The LIRR's Hempstead station (the closest station) is located in a BAD part of Hempstead (not that there are many good parts of Hempstead).  Moreover, it is virtually impossible to park at that train station on weekdays after 6am, and even so, no one I know feels safe leaving their car there.  Hofstra's shuttle goes to the LIRR station, but the shuttle schedule is VERY erratic and unreliable.

OK...just thought I'd clear up the myth that Hofstra is very accessible to NYC.

42
Quote
I'd like to see were you got this info...I've heard on Larry King, and talk radio that her cerebrum is gone. It died, atrophied, and then the space left behind was replaced by spinal fluid...in other words the part of her brain that controls voluntary actions is gone. You can't rehab that. Is there a chance that she could recover...yes...if you believe in God, and miracles, then you have to give it an outside chance, but there is absolutely no MEDICAL treatment that can improve her situation.

The stem that controls involunatay activity...breathing, blinking, and even some sounds and such is still intact...but that is it.

The information I relayed was information I obtained watching the debate.  Reading from the reports of several physicians, Rep. Phil Gingrey (R-Georgia), a physician, noted that "...with proper treatment, now denied, Terri's condition can improve."   See Congressional Record at H712, 713.

Whether or not Terri's condition would improve with treatment, I still don't think Congress had any right to intervene in this situation.

43
Despite medical evidence to the contrary, Terri's parents are holding out hope that she will one day recover. It makes me sick to think about this poor girl lying there in a hospital bed for 16 years with no hope of getting better and no hope of relief until all this plays out in the courts.  Clearly, the decent thing to do would be to let her die.

Actually, several of Terri's physicians have said that with the appropriate treatment and therapy she may improve.  As for what the "decent" thing to do is; that's not for us to decide, and certainly not for Congress to decide.

44
I can't really vote one way or the other.  The problem I have with this situation is that this is none of Congress' business.  What gives our government the right to step in on a case-by-case basis (and that's what this is...they specifically noted that the bill was non-precedential) and determine the fate of any human being's life.  This is a family matter, and it should remain that way. 

Amen.  This is also another great example of why everyone should have a living will.  I'm pretty convinced the husband is right on this one and she wouldn't want to live this way.  I do syympathize with the family though.

From all accounts, Terri Schiavo told multiple people, on different occasions (funerals of friends and loved ones) that if she were ever in that position, she wouldn't want to live.  So I have no doubt that the federal judge who will review this case will agree with every other court that evaluated the matter. Like you, I sympathize with all involved; I'm just pissed that Congress thinks it can interfere in family decisions. 

45
I can't really vote one way or the other.  The problem I have with this situation is that this is none of Congress' business.  What gives our government the right to step in on a case-by-case basis (and that's what this is...they specifically noted that the bill was non-precedential) and determine the fate of any human being's life.  This is a family matter, and it should remain that way. 

46
Politics and Law-Related News / Re: Death for Scott Peterson
« on: March 20, 2005, 08:16:13 AM »
And it's a sad gesture.  The evidence used to convict him was circumstantial, and while I don't think a murder conviction should be based on circumstantial evidence, and while I am 100% against the death penalty, if it must be used, I certainly don't think a death sentence should be imposed based on this type of evidence.



i got a little inside secret for ya - most criminals are convicted on circumstantial evidence.

While some criminals are convicted on circumstantial evidence, its a VAST generalization to say that MOST convictions are based on that type of evidence.  I never said I don't think Peterson killed her; I simply said that there wasn't enough hard evidence to convict him beyone a reasonable doubt.

Turning to the penalty for a second; even assuming that the death penalty was morally right, I still maintain that in order to sentence someone to death, a jury ought to have more than just circumstantial evidence.


47
Politics and Law-Related News / Re: Terry Schiavo
« on: March 20, 2005, 08:11:39 AM »
I just heard that the House and Senate are meeting today (a Sunday, mind you) to consider bills relating to the Terry Schiavo situation.  This is a great example of our country's priorities.  There's a meaningless war going on, and we're losing soldiers by the dozens, and Congress convene's hearings on baseball's drug problems, and then decides to meet on a Sunday (nearly unheard of) to discuss a matter that they have no right buting into. This makes me sick.

48
Law School Admissions / Re: Spinoff- Is a JD a Master's or Doctorate?
« on: March 19, 2005, 07:49:39 AM »
So can you or can you NOT teach law at the university level with a Bachelor's and a JD?


You absolutely can.  Look up any law school's faculty directory online and you're sure to find at least a few professors with only a bachelor's and a JD.

As for the original question: JD = juris doctorate = doctorate degree.  Masters don't take 3 years of full-time study.  It's not a PhD, but it is a doctorate.  Most attorneys don't refer to themselves as "Dr." because it sounds pompous, but I've heard that some do.

The Ethics Committee of the bar association in my state (NY) has found it to be unethical for a licensed attorney to refer to him or herself as Dr. So-and-so.

49
Politics and Law-Related News / Re: Death for Scott Peterson
« on: March 19, 2005, 07:44:47 AM »
And it's a sad gesture.  The evidence used to convict him was circumstantial, and while I don't think a murder conviction should be based on circumstantial evidence, and while I am 100% against the death penalty, if it must be used, I certainly don't think a death sentence should be imposed based on this type of evidence.


50
Politics and Law-Related News / Re: Terry Schiavo
« on: March 19, 2005, 07:43:01 AM »
The courts have absolutely no right to interfere with a personal matter such as this.  End of story.

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