Law School Discussion

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Messages - JonR0921

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41
News Discussion / Re: Terry Schiavo
« on: March 29, 2005, 08:15:02 AM »
So whoever it was that posted earlier that Michael Schiavo planned on having an autopsy performed on terri was correct:

http://www.cnn.com/2005/LAW/03/29/schiavo/index.html

Personally, I think this is a good thing.  It'll certainly silence those who allege that he beat her (if he did, do you think he'd request an autopsy), and it'll allow the parents to see just how severly brain damaged their daughter was; not a pleasanr thing, but maybe after seeing that, they'll realize just how selfish they were being.

42
News Discussion / Re: Terry Schiavo
« on: March 28, 2005, 07:43:45 PM »
It's almost impossible to swallow and breathe at the same time.  There's a flap (I forget what it's called) that closes off the pipes when we eat.  If this were not the case, we'd all choke to death.

The flap is called the epiglottis

43
News Discussion / Re: Terry Schiavo
« on: March 28, 2005, 07:41:14 PM »
No, your grandfather could refuse to have the tube inserted AMA.  A feeding tube, whether everyone agrees or not, counts as life support.

From a legal standpoint, that's not necessarily true.  Where Terri is (Florida), you're correct (Florida Statutes Sec. 765.101 (10)).  However, here in NY, a feeding tube is not considered life support (I don't know the statute offhand, but it can be found in our Public Health Law).

The point is, it varies from state to state whether a feeding tube constitutes life support.

44
Law School Applications / One More Terri Schiavo Thread
« on: March 26, 2005, 07:52:59 AM »
I find something incredibly ironic...Terri Schiavo's are using the judiciary and the legal system to keep their daughter alive, but at the same time, her father is claiming that Terri's death is a "judicial homicide."  This is an extreme case of an abuse of the judiciary, and they need to stop.  If Terri were cogent, I find it hard to believe that she -- or anyone -- would approve of her parent's abuse of the legal system.  It's time for the Schindler's to let their daughter die a peaceful death.

45
Law School Applications / Re: Hofstra
« on: March 24, 2005, 12:51:57 PM »
The city is very accessible from Hofstra...however, keep in mind that this is only the case if you're 'ridin' the rails'...driving is a nightmare and I would not suggest it.  As far as the LIRR goes, it takes 30-45 mins (closer to 30 I think) to get into penn station from Hempstead and it'll probably cost you a decent wage (6-8$, one way depending on the time).  As far as all this talk about Hempstead being a dodgy area, I think the views people are putting forth are misleading.  The disparity between Hempstead and most long island towns is GREAT, but bear in mind that LI is probably one of the richest areas in the country.  Meaning, that for normal folk Hempstead ainít that bad. 

Notwithstanding your assertion that "LI is probably one of the richest areas in the country," most of Hempstead is still BAD.  And I wouldn't call Hempstead (which, by train, is approx. 52 minutes from the city, according to the LIRR schedule) "very accessible" to the city, either.  But I suppose that since people come from different areas, their views on "accessibility" will vary greatly.

46
Law School Applications / Hofstra
« on: March 24, 2005, 11:41:48 AM »
I notice that so many people talk about Hofstra, and its proximity to New York City.  As someone who has a long history with Hofstra, allow me to clarify.  Hofstra is accessible to NYC via the Long Island Railroad (LIRR).  The LIRR's Hempstead station (the closest station) is located in a BAD part of Hempstead (not that there are many good parts of Hempstead).  Moreover, it is virtually impossible to park at that train station on weekdays after 6am, and even so, no one I know feels safe leaving their car there.  Hofstra's shuttle goes to the LIRR station, but the shuttle schedule is VERY erratic and unreliable.

OK...just thought I'd clear up the myth that Hofstra is very accessible to NYC.

47
Quote
I'd like to see were you got this info...I've heard on Larry King, and talk radio that her cerebrum is gone. It died, atrophied, and then the space left behind was replaced by spinal fluid...in other words the part of her brain that controls voluntary actions is gone. You can't rehab that. Is there a chance that she could recover...yes...if you believe in God, and miracles, then you have to give it an outside chance, but there is absolutely no MEDICAL treatment that can improve her situation.

The stem that controls involunatay activity...breathing, blinking, and even some sounds and such is still intact...but that is it.

The information I relayed was information I obtained watching the debate.  Reading from the reports of several physicians, Rep. Phil Gingrey (R-Georgia), a physician, noted that "...with proper treatment, now denied, Terri's condition can improve."   See Congressional Record at H712, 713.

Whether or not Terri's condition would improve with treatment, I still don't think Congress had any right to intervene in this situation.

48
Despite medical evidence to the contrary, Terri's parents are holding out hope that she will one day recover. It makes me sick to think about this poor girl lying there in a hospital bed for 16 years with no hope of getting better and no hope of relief until all this plays out in the courts.  Clearly, the decent thing to do would be to let her die.

Actually, several of Terri's physicians have said that with the appropriate treatment and therapy she may improve.  As for what the "decent" thing to do is; that's not for us to decide, and certainly not for Congress to decide.

49
I can't really vote one way or the other.  The problem I have with this situation is that this is none of Congress' business.  What gives our government the right to step in on a case-by-case basis (and that's what this is...they specifically noted that the bill was non-precedential) and determine the fate of any human being's life.  This is a family matter, and it should remain that way. 

Amen.  This is also another great example of why everyone should have a living will.  I'm pretty convinced the husband is right on this one and she wouldn't want to live this way.  I do syympathize with the family though.

From all accounts, Terri Schiavo told multiple people, on different occasions (funerals of friends and loved ones) that if she were ever in that position, she wouldn't want to live.  So I have no doubt that the federal judge who will review this case will agree with every other court that evaluated the matter. Like you, I sympathize with all involved; I'm just pissed that Congress thinks it can interfere in family decisions. 

50
I can't really vote one way or the other.  The problem I have with this situation is that this is none of Congress' business.  What gives our government the right to step in on a case-by-case basis (and that's what this is...they specifically noted that the bill was non-precedential) and determine the fate of any human being's life.  This is a family matter, and it should remain that way. 

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