Law School Discussion

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Messages - Citylaw

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251
Where should I go next fall? / Re: Thoughts on law school?
« on: December 03, 2013, 09:18:38 PM »
With those scores it is highly unlikely you will attend BC, Tulane or SMU.

That does not mean you cannot obtain a quality education as I tell numberous people on this site at every ABA law school you learn the same thing and any ABA school will provide you with a bar exam ticket, which will enable you to obtain a law license. What you do with that is up to you.

With that said it appears you want to attend law school in Boston or Texas/Louisiana.

In Boston you might want to consider New Englad, Western New England or Suffolk.

In Texas South Texas College of Law, Texas A & M, or Texas Tech might be options.

As an aside Louisiana is the only state in America governed by Civil Law the European system so you might receive a different education at a Louisiana Law School than you would at any other school across the County and unless your plan is to live in Louisiana after graduation you may want to consider attending school in a different state.

If there are other schools you are interested in Miam's advice is excellent and will provide you with information on other schools within your range.

Good luck.

252
Washington and Lee / Re: Washington and Lee Graduates Salaries Decline
« on: December 03, 2013, 12:44:20 AM »
Yes I do based on real life experiences.

My main point is filling out a voluntary survey is not on the top of most people's priority list particularly those who are busy practicing law.

253
I figured as much

254
I wish you the best, but the Bar Exam will not be as flexible as American Heritage. You will have to take the Bar Exam in February or July and be ready to go.

It is interesting to hear these perspective on the online schools and I imagine it is the reason their pass rates are so much lower. It is not that the education is any worse, but at an ABA school you are forced to cram a massive amount of information for finals and they do not work around your schedule, which is stressful, but when you take the Bar Exam they cram everything into one three day test making law school finals seem like a joke.

I wish you the best on your legal education and future legal career.

255
LSAC and LSDAS / Re: Repeated information on certain applications on LSAC
« on: December 03, 2013, 12:33:57 AM »
I would say just fill it out never hurts to add a resume, but as Irrx said it really will not make much of a difference. Remember a few admission officers are reading 1000's of applications and they are not nitpicking every detail. Your LSAT/GPA will be the basis of the decision and you should have a competent personal statement, adding these additions or not will probably account for less than 1% of the decision, but you might as well provide more information there is nothing to lose.

256
It is good you determined it was not for you, but it can be a very rewarding career. I am an attorney and love it, but I have worked at horrible places and awesome ones. The law is like any career it works for some and not for others I would never want to be a nurse or doctor, but plenty of people love it.

However, I encourage anyone interested in attending law school to do what the OP did and test it out. I was a paralegal myself before law school and knew it was for me, but the OP just saved  3 years of his life and 100K by seeing how it works first hand.

This is basically like every profession T.V. and Movies glamorize Doctors, Lawyers, Cops, but at the end of the day your going to work and will have to deal with B.S and I don't know many people in any profession that claim to be underworked and overpaid. 



257
L.L.M. Board / Re: LLM in tax without a JD
« on: November 25, 2013, 09:09:56 PM »
Good info and very responsive to the question. This board has some great posters.

258
Law School Applications / Re: What are my chances?
« on: November 22, 2013, 12:16:49 AM »
I am aware and I am rooting for you to get a 4.0, but the reality is it probably will not happen. For the same reason I don't have six pack abs it takes a ton of time and you like me are human and likely will not pull off a 4.0 this semester. I hope you prove me wrong, but odds are you go out drinking occasionally while your in college, miss a class or two, get infatuated with a boy/girl, have a fight with a friend, etc a million things could happen and if you haven't been getting 4.0's before it probably won't start now.

Again, I encourage you to prove me wrong and I hope you get a 4.0, but we all face our limitations and I don't want you to think you cannot become a lawyer if you don't get a 4.0 or this semester. Even if you get a 3.1 again and take the LSAT you can still attend law school and become a lawyer.

Again, good luck and I sincerely hope you get a 4.0.

259
General Board / Re: Entering Law School in USA
« on: November 21, 2013, 01:16:28 AM »
I responded to this question in another thread and a copy/paste of my response there is below.

All the information you will need can be found on LSAC here is the link for LSAC http://www.lsac.org/ and here is the specific link for future JD Students http://www.lsac.org/jd

The LSAT is offered four times a year and you apply through LSAC as an FYI LSAC is an acronym for the Law School Admissions Council. You will need to create an LSAC account and wants that is done you can register for the LSAT here http://www.lsac.org/jd/lsat/about-the-lsat . Applying for the is fairly easy, but you need to pay approximately $150 U.S. Dollars.

Additionally it does look like you can take the LSAT in a few European countries here is a list of international test centers. http://www.lsac.org/docs/default-source/jd-docs/testcentercodesoutsideuscaribbeancanada.pdf

You will also need to take the TOEFL test http://www.ets.org/toefl and obtain a certain score I believe it varies by law school for international students, but I am not 100% sure.

When I was in law school there were a few international students that went through the program full time and I know you do not need to be a United States Citizen to be licensed to practice law in California.

Another route you can do is get a law degree in Europe then enroll in a one year LLM program in the United States. I met a lot of international students that did this, because it allows you to sit for the bar exam with only one year of law school in America.

If you have additional questions feel free to comment and never hesitate to contact law schools you are interested in. Below is a link to every California ABA law school and New York Law School.

California
https://officialguide.lsac.org/Release/SchoolsABAData/SchoolsAndLocation.aspx?schoolinfo=schoolsandlocation&alphabeticalrange=allschools&geographicsearch=CA

New York
https://officialguide.lsac.org/Release/SchoolsABAData/SchoolsAndLocation.aspx?schoolinfo=schoolsandlocation&alphabeticalrange=allschools&geographicsearch=NY

If you have additional questions feel free to post or send me a private message.

260
General Board / Re: Entering Law School in USA
« on: November 21, 2013, 12:24:45 AM »
All the information you will need can be found on LSAC here is the link for LSAC http://www.lsac.org/ and here is the specific link for future JD Students http://www.lsac.org/jd

The LSAT is offered four times a year and you apply through LSAC as an FYI LSAC is an acronym for the Law School Admissions Council. You will need to create an LSAC account and wants that is done you can register for the LSAT here http://www.lsac.org/jd/lsat/about-the-lsat . Applying for the is fairly easy, but you need to pay approximately $150 U.S. Dollars.

Additionally it does look like you can take the LSAT in a few European countries here is a list of international test centers. http://www.lsac.org/docs/default-source/jd-docs/testcentercodesoutsideuscaribbeancanada.pdf

You will also need to take the TOEFL test http://www.ets.org/toefl and obtain a certain score I believe it varies by law school for international students, but I am not 100% sure.

When I was in law school there were a few international students that went through the program full time and I know you do not need to be a United States Citizen to be licensed to practice law in California.

Another route you can do is get a law degree in Europe then enroll in a one year LLM program in the United States. I met a lot of international students that did this, because it allows you to sit for the bar exam with only one year of law school in America.

If you have additional questions feel free to comment and never hesitate to contact law schools you are interested in. Below is a link to every California ABA law school and New York Law School.

California
https://officialguide.lsac.org/Release/SchoolsABAData/SchoolsAndLocation.aspx?schoolinfo=schoolsandlocation&alphabeticalrange=allschools&geographicsearch=CA

New York
https://officialguide.lsac.org/Release/SchoolsABAData/SchoolsAndLocation.aspx?schoolinfo=schoolsandlocation&alphabeticalrange=allschools&geographicsearch=NY

If you have additional questions feel free to post or send me a private message.

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