Law School Discussion

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Messages - jakia

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11
"Nationally known for our clinical programs, concentrations, and interdisciplinary approach; you will graduate with the skills to work in all facets of the law."

Again with the misused semi-colon.


Not exactly -- The semicolon is used to shift the focus of the sentence.  It also prevents the sentence from being misread.


If a semicolon is being used, both sides of the semicolon should be grammatically complete sentences.  An exception would be the list example I gave earlier.  In the UB sentence, a list precedes the semicolon, and it is not a complete sentence.  A comma would not cause the sentence to be misread because of the "and" symbolizing that the list is coming to a close with that last item (in this case, the "interdisciplinary approach").

You cite the rule that is applicable to semicolon use 90% of the time.  In case you're wondering, I can support that statistic by citing numerous case studies.  :)  As you can see from my other posts, there are exceptions.  I swear that I'm not some grammar-obsessed troll.  I just recognized a fellow type-A in you, and wanted to be sure that you could always be right in the future.  ;D

12

"This coupled with Buffalo's modest cost-of-living, makes UB an obvious choice."

Where's the other comma?


No other comma is needed.  If you are referring to "Coupled with Buffalo's modest cost-of-living", it is a restrictive clause; therefore, no comma is necessary.


I'm saying the sentence should read: "This, coupled with Buffalo's modest cost-of living, makes UB an obvious choice."  The commas in this case separate something that is parenthetical, but they can't serve that function if there is only one comma.  It's like having a ) without a ( to precede it; they work together and need each other.

It's a restrictive clause; it's necessary to convey the complete meaning of the sentence.  My argument is that NO comma is necessary.  The two things must work together to make UB an "obvious choice."

13
Not to rain on the Pookie Parade or anything, but you shouldn't make all of the changes that you suggest.  Otherwise, *you* may be the recipient of a red-inked paper.


"In addition to your LSAT score and academic achievements; your personal statement, book essays, letters of recommendation and extracurricular activities will weigh heavily in the decision-making process."

I know semi-colons are great and all, but don't misuse them.


It's not misused.  The semicolon introduces a list.  This semicolon prevents the sentence from being misread.


There are only two items in the first list and no comma is used; thus I don't think a semicolon should be used.  A semicolon makes sense within a list when you're separating list items that contain commas themselves, for example:

This summer, I traveled to Phoenix, Arizona; Las Vegas, Nevada; and San Francisco, California.

Forgive me.  I didn't provide an adequate explanation.  A semicolon is appropriately used when used in place of a comma (that would otherwise cause misreading), which I'm sure that you believe should follow the dependent cluse "In addition to...."  If the semicolon were not in place, the sentence would read that in additon to your LSAT, academic achievements, your personal statement, book essays, etc.  As you can see, that is definitely incorrect.

The example you gave is exactly correct; but, does not apply to this case.

14
Not to rain on the Pookie Parade or anything, but you shouldn't make all of the changes that you suggest.  Otherwise, *you* may be the recipient of a red-inked paper.


"In addition to your LSAT score and academic achievements; your personal statement, book essays, letters of recommendation and extracurricular activities will weigh heavily in the decision-making process."

I know semi-colons are great and all, but don't misuse them.


It's not misused.  The semicolon introduces a list.  This semicolon prevents the sentence from being misread.

"This coupled with Buffalo's modest cost-of-living, makes UB an obvious choice."

Where's the other comma?


No other comma is needed.  If you are referring to "Coupled with Buffalo's modest cost-of-living", it is a restrictive clause; therefore, no comma is necessary.

"Nationally known for our clinical programs, concentrations, and interdisciplinary approach; you will graduate with the skills to work in all facets of the law."

Again with the misused semi-colon.


Not exactly -- The semicolon is used to shift the focus of the sentence.  It also prevents the sentence from being misread.


On the actual application...

"Part V: Requireed Book Essay."


NO EXCUSE!

BTW, semicolon is not hyphenated.

Hope this helps.


15
Law School Applications / Re: Education major vs. English major
« on: August 16, 2004, 08:58:30 AM »
Do NOT major in education.  For law school admissions it is definitely comparable to a PE major.  

Furthermore, only teach if you have a passion for it.  Your inability to chose a career should not affect hundreds of students.  Manage a Taco Bell if you can't figure out your career path.  You'll make more money and you will spare some young kids while you "find yourself."

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