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Topics - sheltron5000

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11
Okay, so I'm filling out the rest of my apps when I realize, that there is a really stupid request on a few so far:

Duke
NYU
Columbia

They ask if you have had any disciplinary action. I did. They say you should include matters which have been expunged. Mine has. They say if you answer yes, you need to get a detailed letter of explanation from an official at your university.

How can an official explain a matter that has been expunged?

I guess I have to make a call to my school tomorrow and see what they can do for me.

12
Law School Applications / Conduct Violation Addendum
« on: October 17, 2008, 04:16:31 PM »
OK, so I was caught drinking in the dorms once, and now I have to write an addendum for it. I know it's not a big deal-I'm 21 now so I think I'm allowed to drink in most municipalities. I just want some confirmation on the form...

How long should such an addendum be? I'm thinking 1 paragraph. too long? too short?

What kind of tone should it use? Conciliatory, explanatory, what I learned etc.?

Thanks in advance!

Sheltron

13
Studying for the LSAT / My experience: Yonsei Testing Center in Seoul, Korea
« on: September 30, 2008, 12:05:49 PM »
OK. I've gotten a few people asking for more information about my experience at the Seoul LSAT.

Just FYI, I took the 2008 June LSAT. When I took it there was a good deal of confusion about the testing center, LSAC gave the test takers the wrong center, and changed the location, but not the test center number.

NOTE: This was an aberration and a mistake on LSAC's part not on the Korean procter's.

I took a taxi the morning of--just tell the taxi driver "Yonsei DaeHakYo." I looked at the big map at the entrance to find the building and walked there. It was pretty easy to find. Unfortunately, by 8:30 nothing was happening and all the 200 or so people there were milling around confused. Eventually someone from the test administrators--who had called LSAC to find out why they didn't have anyone there--came and told us there had been a mistake. They told us where the real testing center would be and delayed the test by two hours so we could get there with plenty of time. They announced this in English and Korean. I took a bus with a bunch of other people, someone who knew where the other university was and got there in plenty of time.

NOTE: This was an aberration and a mistake on LSAC's part not on the Korean procter's.

For the test itself. All the signs were in English, though the test takers seemed to be more than 2/3 korean--but  I know from talking to some of the korean test takers that many of them were American or Canadian, so whatever. People were assigned to rooms by last names. When it was time for the test, we had to leave our backpacks downstairs, then go upstairs to the testing rooms. Your stuff is pretty safe in Korea so that wasn't really a big deal. Then we lined up to go into our respective rooms.

We had to sign and show an ID, just like at the LSAT in the US. The proctors were all, or almost all, older women (ajuma, if you know korean), so there wasn't much communication necessary there. Plus, the koreans there to take the test were happy to translate for us foreigners. Each room had two proctors, and at least one of them spoke reasonably good English. In my room it was a younger guy, he looked like he was maybe a freshman in college. They gave directions in both Korean and English, although the directions in Korean seemed more complex. The instructions in English were adequate. One note, if your proctor says something about "sharp pencils" they mean mechanical pencils which are no longer allowed on the LSAT, bring your own + sharpener. When it came to the actual test though, the English speaking proctor just read the instructions from the book.

As for the testing Environment, there was nothing wrong with it. It was mid-june in Seoul, so it was hot, but the room had AC. There was a bit of a tug of war over the AC, a lot of the Koreans complained about the noise so they turned it off, then everyone was too hot, so they turned it back on during the break. The building was well shaded though, so it never got REALLY hot... The lighting was a little dim, as I've found is typical of Korean classrooms. The desks were the standard tabletop-attached-to-chair kind of deal, but there was an empty desk between all the testers so there was plenty of space. On a seating note, I and the other foreigners noticed that we were all seated in one column, and the Koreans had the rest of the space, which was a little odd.

The proctors were reasonable, I think they were actually intimidated by all the foreigners. But they were strict about some of the rules, such as no mechanical pencils. I think if you insisted loudly enough on anything that was reasonable they would cave eventually. As I said, one proctor spoke English the other did not, but nothing came up to test the communication issues so... *shrug* Timing wise, things seemed fairly normal. The proctors had their own timer, then wrote time left on the board. I used my watch to time myself, and although their time was fine, it did seem a little looser than I had expected, maybe 1 minute off or so, and the warnings could be a little odd--four minute warning instead of five, etc.

NOTE: The LSATs administered outside of North America, and I think the Caribbean, are not disclosed, and they use a different test from the disclosed ones as well. So if you see questions discussed that you don't remember (from my test I remember people talking about the cupcake game that I never saw), that's why. That means they use a different score band, which is not disclosed either, I think. Also, the times can be very different, so be sure to check your ticket for the time and date, it may not be the same as the test administered in North America.

I think that's all I can remember, if anyone has anything else to add, or any questions I'll try to reply to them pretty soon.

Good luck everyone!

-sheltron5000

EDIT: I forgot something really important! The proctors were ALL very nice and neutral, nothing to send you into spiraling fits of nervousness. Calm atmosphere on their side, the most nervous were all the test takers.

14
Personal Statement / New Open Message Board for Personal Statement Exchanges
« on: September 27, 2008, 04:33:14 PM »
I got tired of waiting and so did everyone else, I suspect.

OK, so the guy who was running the other board has apparently been abducted by person's unknown. I started a new board @ http://s1.zetaboards.com/Personal_Statements/index/ If you want to participate, please register and remember to comment on other peoples PS/DS/Whatever.

HTH, and good luck everyone.

PS: the ads don't pay me, they pay the company, zetaboards, who is hosting the board.

15
General board for soon-to-be 1Ls / Foreign Languages
« on: July 15, 2008, 10:10:53 PM »
So here's my story, I've been teaching English in South Korea. I am coming back this fall to apply to law school. After I get all my apps in, I think I'd like to go abroad again, to study another language. I am already reasonably fluent in German.

Are there any other languages you guys think would be useful for a lawyer?

Thanks in advance!

16
Where should I go next fall? / Information about program specifics?
« on: July 08, 2008, 10:04:30 PM »
I moved this over from the reviews and rankings board since it wasn't getting any attention.

The basic question is that some schools have reputations for good programs in certain areas of law, where can you find that kind of information?


I've been looking around and everyone seems to know what programs each school is known for or good at, but I just have no idea. I'm thinking of things like UCLA is known for entertainment law, Lewis and Clark for environmental law, and Berkeley is known for intellectual property (I think). Obviously this would be a good way to tell them apart, but where do you find the information? Are there books or websites you recommend? Can you really get all of this from the various schools' websites?

If you just want to give it to me, here's my short list:

Chicago
Berkeley
Michigan
Northwestern
Cornell
USC
UCLA
U. of Washington

17
I've been looking around and everyone seems to know what programs each school is known for or good at, but I just have no idea. I'm thinking of things like UCLA is known for entertainment law, Lewis and Clark for environmental law, and Berkeley is known for intellectual property (I think). Obviously this would be a good way to tell them apart, but where do you find the information? Are there books or websites you recommend? Can you really get all of this from the various schools' websites?

If you just want to give it to me, here's my short list :D:

Chicago
Berkeley
Michigan
Northwestern
Cornell
USC
UCLA
U. of Washington

???

18
Since the June LSAT is now just a week away, I thought I'd give everyone something else to worry about ;).

What do you think? My vote is pure conjecture, if anyone has read any articles or has data on this I'd be curious to read it.


-Sheldon

19
Studying for the LSAT / Prep Test 13: Section 4: Q14
« on: June 06, 2008, 02:01:01 AM »
Can anyone help me out with this one? This is the Persian cats formal logic question, "all of these are true EXCEPT:" and on the face of it the given correct answer (e) looks true, I chose (c) as false, but the answer sheet says it must be true?

Help?

20
Personal Statement / Personal Statement Confusion :( Help?
« on: May 27, 2008, 05:30:56 AM »
I'm trying to get started on my personal statement and having a really tough time picking a topic. I've read all the essays I can find and it seems like there are really three kinds of essays: "why I want to be a lawyer," "my life changing experience," or the "my childhood/background." The first two don't really work for me, but I can't think how to go about the "background" essay. My background is a little unusual, and it seems that writing about it all is too long, but writing about any one part seems to sell me short...

I'm a white gay male from a broken home, my father is a recovering alcoholic and my mother co-dependent. I spent grade school changing from school to school and most of it in special education programs for ADHD, Asperger's Syndrome, and related behavioral disorders. After a rapid turn around I went to a catholic high school where I spent my junior year as an exchange student in Germany.

What do you think? How do I shorten all that without leaving the important stuff out?

Thanks!

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