Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.

Messages - cisforcookie

Pages: 1 2 3 [4] 5 6 7
31
I don't have any real opinion on which school would be best for you, but st louis always struck me as a great midwestern city. it has great weather, great sports, great restaurants, great parks and scenery. it's definitely number 2 after chicago on the list of midwestern cities that I would be happy to end up in.

the wustl scholarships are all guaranteed. can't speak for the others.

32
Law School Applications / Re: Wustl? Why the hold up?
« on: March 06, 2008, 12:07:43 PM »
It is not inconceivable that they are getting a very good response from their scholarship offers. They may be very concerned at this point about over-enrolling.

33
Oh what a rebel I am. I say forget the rankings in this case. Neither one of these schools has any national pull whatsoever, so decide whether you'd like to be scraping for a job in northern california or in nevada. Assume you won't keep the scholly at UNLV past year 1. The end.

34
Where should I go next fall? / Re: Living in Houston v. Philly
« on: February 29, 2008, 11:04:03 AM »
heh. i didn't mean to suggest that philly was an iceberg, but, being from the general area, I can definitely attest to wind chills below 20, especially in the morning, being not uncommon. the straight temperature average low is going to be in the mid 20s in the winter. I think the wind chill here was like 5 degrees a week or two ago. the only time i care about temperature is usually in the morning when I'm going to my car to drive to work, and it will usually warm up throughout the day. i often wear a ski mask during my commute in the winter because walking from the house to the car and from the car to the office is very uncomfortable on my face. I imagine that it'd be a pretty large difference from texas. personally, i'd take more cold days to get rid of some of these hot and humid days that pretty much ruin large portions of the summer for me.

35
Where should I go next fall? / Re: Living in Houston v. Philly
« on: February 29, 2008, 10:27:06 AM »
Imagine the coldest day you can ever remember in texas. Maybe on that day everything shut down because people were so frightened of the cold. I think the record low for houston was like 5 degrees F. With the wind chill, philly will frequently approach that temperature in the winter. people bundle up, and use alot of moisturizer. It'll snow every year, but not _that_ much. WHen there's ice on the roads, people avoid driving.

36
Where should I go next fall? / Re: Mayland v. Tulane?
« on: February 29, 2008, 07:05:16 AM »
as an aside, I've never heard anyone here in town call it UMDB. there's UM-B and UB. just a hint so you don't go confusing the locals.

I know nothing about tulane, but the vast majority of UM-B grads leave the city and wind up in DC and in the surrounding counties doing respectable law firm type work. The UB people pick up the scraps.

37
Where should I go next fall? / Re: Trial Law
« on: February 26, 2008, 01:20:16 PM »
I guess I still don't really understand. Isn't it still advantageous to go to the best school possible? Or would it really open more doors to go to a lower ranked school?

It's hard to say really. I just don't think anyone from those schools does that. You wouldn't have any alumni support, which is going to be a hugely useful networking tool. I'm not suggesting at all that you should go to a significantly worse school than you get into. It's one thing to take a school in the 15-30 range with money over a 1-14 school because you want to half no debt and go into a non-lucrative field. You still have good options out of those 15-30 schools. You have very few options out of a much lower school.

38
Where should I go next fall? / Re: Trial Law
« on: February 26, 2008, 12:30:21 PM »
heh. noone biting eh? i guess i'll take a swing at this. my answers relate entirely to the practice of trial lawyering. i know relatively little about civil litigation.

the only people who ever do anything meaningful in a courtroom are small firm lawyers, PDs, prosecutors, city/state/federal solicitors, and senior members of big law firms. anything federal is highly competitive, and becoming a senior litigating partner at a large law firm is an incredible amount of work and luck. the rest will mostly be populated by graduates of whatever local school produces more graduates than the nearby larger firms want. In my state, there are only 2 law schools and both are public. the better school sends most of its grads to firms or out of state to nearby big cities. the worse school produces the majority of the trial lawyers in the state and the majority of the judges.

I think you would find that the number of people who spend a number of years as trial lawyers who come out of places like northwestern, chicago, cornell, and even wustl is going to be much much less than the same number from places like Chicago Kent.

of course, i'm guessing based on my knowledge of my local legal market. the city of chicago might be filled with graduates of the university of chicago who work as low level trial lawyers. probably the same number of graduates of harvard business school who manage grocery stores.

at the higher levels, large corporate lawsuits especially, very few trials take place. those cases almost all settle.

39
Where should I go next fall? / Re: Most competetive markets?
« on: February 26, 2008, 06:52:17 AM »
Any place that would be really nice to live in will have a more competitive legal market. Those places also sometimes become more insular because they dislike all the new faces. New york has lots of jobs, and the weather is mediocre, and there's the smog and the traffic. But places like San Fran are really pleasant, so it's tougher to get the same job. Apply that methodology and I think you'll do well. Just think of it like buying real estate. You can get more house in Kansas City than you can in DC or San Fran for the same money, but you're also getting that location and what it brings. The effective "prices" in terms of credentials of jobs go up the more people want to live there relative to how many jobs there are. This is why so many people end up in new york.

40
Yeah, but median at a Top 5 will definitely get BigLaw somewhere, even Vault10 BigLaw with good interviewing skills or at a firm like Kirkland, which loves Chicago grads.

Credited.

80-90% of Chicago's class can get BIGLAW.

Even if OP only works 1-2 years in BIGLAW, the Chicago degree will go so much further than a wustl degree when he leaves.

What about the bottom?  They can't?

The further down you go, the more your grades start weighing you down.  An unsocial, unconnected white dude at the very bottom of the class probably has issues getting market.

what this means is that we really have no idea. none of us are hiring partners. grades matter, but there are other ways to disqualify yourself and many of those 10-15 percent that this thread hypotheses will not have biglaw as a choice will fall into that category. if you think that you are a friendly, charismatic and/or charming person, then you will probably do well. we think. but you must realize that there are always going to be people in a class who simply don't get along that well with others. they got great grades, and had a high lsat score, and there they are, but they simply don't have the people skills, and there is a good amount of anecdotal evidence that those people suffer from it. there is also good anecdotal evidence that the ability to make friends easily can make up for bad grades to a high degree. you might consider this in your decision of whether to go to law school at all, as being personable and making friends is going to help you more in your career than a degree from yale.

on an unrelated note, there is high anecdotal evidence that I suffer from writing too many very long sentences.

Pages: 1 2 3 [4] 5 6 7