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Messages - woeisme

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61
Choosing the Right Law School / Re: Where to Apply ED: Penn? Georgetown?
« on: September 08, 2008, 01:17:05 AM »
Since he brought it up, I might as well expand it. I would really like to end up at Northwestern or Michigan, but with my numbers, the chances aren't the best.

Northwestern seems out of the question, because I have almost no work experience. But with ED, would that help my chances? And what about Michigan? I feel I'd have a decent chance there.

Originally, I had really been wanting these schools as well. Actually, I did kind of want Northwestern all along (I love Chicago), but after my visit to Ann Arbor, my affection for UM kind of faded to a certain degree. Anyway, yeah, if you're straight out of undergrad, it's a bit trickier to get into NU. I do know someone last cycle with a 3.43/171 who got in straight from undergrad though. Not sure how she did that. Your numbers are find for NU, for sure. This cycle, if you hit 170 and had a pulse, they admitted you. MIchigan will care more about GPA for most of their applicants. I think you have a solid shot there and should potentially consider applying ED if you still have those warm fuzzy feelings for it after visiting (which I recommend you do, if you haven't!)

62
Choosing the Right Law School / Re: Where to Apply ED: Penn? Georgetown?
« on: September 08, 2008, 01:14:00 AM »
woeisme: Thank you very much. That was really, really helpful. Out of curiosity, are those numbers based on any specific data (LSN? thelawschoolreport.com?) or just a gut feeling since you've become familiar with the process?

Again, thanks!

Heh, gut feeling - just based on what I've seen this past cycle and stuff. Totally unscientific :) FWIW (probably not much), I applied ED to Penn this past cycle and was flat-out rejected, ... though others on LSN with lower numbers were waitlisted, deferred, and in a couple cases, even accepted. I know someone with a 3.5/162 who got in ED to Penn. Of course, those occurrences are few and far between, ... but I guess they happen. Sometimes it seems like the whole process is kind of a crapshoot... to a certain extent.

What I'm curious about, is why GULC and Penn? I mean these are great schools, obviously, but why them as opposed to others?

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Choosing the Right Law School / Re: Where to Apply ED: Penn? Georgetown?
« on: September 07, 2008, 09:39:24 PM »
I realize that not all T14 schools offer ED, but for the sake of this post, I'll pretend they do. Considering a 3.4 GPA, I'd say your chances at HYS are basically shot. Beyond the T3, choice of school might look something like this:

Columbia - 174
Chicago - 172
NYU - 172
Berkeley - 175. Berk is a huge GPA-whoring school.
Penn - 170
Michigan - 168
Virginia - 170
Cornell - 169
Duke - 169
Northwestern -NU is  probably the biggest LSAT-whoring school of them all - they seem to take a lot of low GPAs (<3.0), as long as they're paired with 170+ LSATs. Under ED, you might be able to get in with a 168
GULC - 170

64
Studying for the LSAT / Re: LSAT 3rd try?
« on: September 02, 2008, 04:18:09 PM »
If you're happy with your current ten point increase, retaking would not be worthwhile. At all.

65
Choosing the Right Law School / Re: Best school for NYC biglaw?
« on: August 29, 2008, 02:06:57 PM »
Out of the four, Cornell has the best placement in NYC biglaw. Fact. Period.

The other three all place well too, though, and you'd likely face little difficulty finding a biglaw job in NYC from them.

You really think that a hiring partner would generally take a Cornell over a Michigan grad primarily due to the alma mater?  You may very well be right, but I'm a bit skeptical that this factor will have a strong independent effect.

Well, last year when I was living in NYC and working in the legal field, I asked a couple hiring partners from a couple firms their opinions on various schools, ... the ones I had mentioned were Michigan, Cornell, Georgetown, Washington University, and Duke. I was told by both partners that Cornell has the best placement out of those schools in the city.

I've also seen a chart or something one time, which I can't find now, but I'll look for. I think Cornell was ranked sixth for NYC biglaw, ahead of the other ones mentioned, but behind Columbia, Penn, NYU, Harvard, Yale, and Stanford (or something like that?).

I really am not convinced that an applicant should really make career placement in NYC a decisive factor at this point. I mean, yeah, I guess if all else is equal, Cornell would be the surest bet. Similarly, Northwestern and Michigan both probably place better than Cornell in the Chicago market, but that doesn't mean a Cornell grad will have a hard time there.

The OP should definitely visit these schools, and decide what feels the best. It's unlikely that (s)he'd have difficulty getting a job in NYC from any of them.

Anyone agree with this?

66
Choosing the Right Law School / Re: Poor Freshman Year
« on: August 29, 2008, 01:56:44 PM »
Yeah, I had a similar trend too.

3.2, 3.6, 3.9, 4.0 or something like that. I know my first semester freshman year was a 2.4. A surprising number of students mess up their first semester/year. It shouldn't keep you out of anywhere you'd otherwise get in. No worries :)

67
Choosing the Right Law School / Re: Best school for NYC biglaw?
« on: August 29, 2008, 01:49:35 PM »
Out of the four, Cornell has the best placement in NYC biglaw. Fact. Period.

The other three all place well too, though, and you'd likely face little difficulty finding a biglaw job in NYC from them.

68
Law School Admissions / Re: Which of the t14 apps are "unconventional"?
« on: August 07, 2008, 03:10:10 AM »
I think a thread like this is a great idea if we could compile a list and then maybe organize and sticky it?

Personal Statement:
Berkeley - 2 - 4 pages
Yale - 250 words (and a PS, if appropriate)
Penn - 2 Page Maximum

Why School X:
Columbia
Penn
Duke
Michigan

Diversity Statement:
Columbia

Interviews:
Northwestern
Harvard - by invitation

I know all schools (I believe) accept diversity statements, but Columbia strongly encourages them if applicable. I'm happy to amend my list if others post. I also believe that Yale requires the 250 but they also accept other documents such as a personal statement that you submit to many schools. These were just off the top of my head.

Two oversights that I can think of:

1. Cornell also has a "Why Cornell" (optional); and
2. Georgetown also conducts invitation-only interviews

69
Law School Admissions / Re: Failed College Class: Doomed for LS?
« on: June 15, 2008, 02:13:07 AM »
That one F from your first semester shouldn't bar you from a T14. Your overall GPA, though, might. It will really depend on your LSAT score. It's helpful that you're a URM, but to really be a "competitive" applicant for top schools, you should aim for a 170+ to combine with your work experience and 3.09 GPA.

70
Hey everyone,

My username may be a bit misleading. I am an incoming student at Harvard in the fall, but in the Ph.D. program in German, not the law school. I did apply to law school, though, just not at Harvard. I was looking to stay more or less local (Southeast), so I applied to and got into a couple schools (UT-Knoxville being the best). However, I didn't get any scholarship at all, and the way I figured, it couldn't hurt to decline UT this cycle in favor of attending grad school at Harvard and getting my Masters. Certainly this must better my chances of getting into a better school (say UGA, Vanderbilt or Emory), right?. I realize that my stats were low for these schools (158, 3.45-graduated with dual Honors from Vanderbilt), but I plan to retake the LSAT, with high probability of increasing my score a couple points at least, and an advanced Harvard degree has got to count for something, right? What do you guys think?

Your Harvard degree will be a great soft-factor. Nevertheless, the LSAT is the generally the key factor in admission. If your LSAT was closer to the 25th percentile at a given school, having a Masterís from Harvard might help you get over the hump and gain admission.

You should try to raise your LSAT to get closer to the median at Emory and UGA.


I agree. Further, if you don't actually care about the Masters, ... it seems like it might be a waste!

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