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Messages - Connelly

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11
Non-Traditional Students / Re: for us older folk...
« on: October 09, 2008, 03:39:49 PM »
I miss working
I miss earning money, and
I miss being around people my own age

(sorry 20-somethings, you are boring :) )

I am a youngin' at 28, but your last point is good.  I am attending a part-time program and fear I would have choked some of the students in the full-time program.  The difference between the day and the night students was brough into stark contrast by the "keg party" invitation sent out through Facebook.

The part-time students also have a much broader range of backgrounds.  Half the fun is finding out the background of the people I'm going to school with. 

 

What's wrong with keg parties?  If I didn't live so far away from campus, I'd be right there alongside the "youngin's." 

Nothing...it's just that the appeal of having a party centered around a keg was lost on me around the time I was old enough to purchase a keg.  I hear very few adults inquire about when the next kegger is. 

12
Non-Traditional Students / Re: for us older folk...
« on: October 06, 2008, 10:33:33 AM »
I miss working
I miss earning money, and
I miss being around people my own age

(sorry 20-somethings, you are boring :) )

I am a youngin' at 28, but your last point is good.  I am attending a part-time program and fear I would have choked some of the students in the full-time program.  The difference between the day and the night students was brough into stark contrast by the "keg party" invitation sent out through Facebook.

The part-time students also have a much broader range of backgrounds.  Half the fun is finding out the background of the people I'm going to school with. 

 

13
General Board / Re: What do you seek in a note taking software?
« on: October 01, 2008, 12:08:27 PM »
Like on OneNote you can do screen captures, links from Lexis/Westlaw (legal databases), send e-mail to your notes, synch to-dos with Outlook, and keep audio notes to yourself.

These features were pretty helpful.  I like to be able to take appointments in Outlook and make them into notes. 

14
General Board / Re: What do you seek in a note taking software?
« on: October 01, 2008, 10:47:29 AM »


Note taking software is pretty useless during class or a meeting.  It ends up preventing you on focusing on the information being discussed.  Retention will be much better if you understand what is being said.  I do, however, love OneNote for going in after class or a meeting and entering my notes.  Freedom to drag, drop, copy, paste, insert documents, etc. is all good.  The reason I chose OneNote over Evernote is that OneNote organizes the pages better than OneNote does.  I like to group things by a major subject (work, school, finances, etc.), then by a subject, and then include separate pages under each subject. 

15
General Board / Re: PArt-Time Programs
« on: August 28, 2008, 11:36:39 AM »
Almost every firm requests transcripts; if I were an attorney evaluating a candidate who had failed to mention on his resume or in the interview that he was a part-time student and I got the transcripts, I'd think he was dishonest and have some unanswered questions.  (Like... do you have a full-time job?  Are you planning to stay in that job?  If not, what are you doing with your extra time?)

I agree with this.  As a part-time student who is also working full-time plus overtime, I would WANT to make it clear to future employers that I handled the load that I currently am handling.  You also have to think that if they DO have a problem with you being a PT student, then you will eventually have problems there anyway.  If they don't have a problem with it...well then why not tell them? 

16
Law Firms / Re: Real deal on law firm life
« on: August 19, 2008, 10:03:11 AM »
Actuary is a job that is often advertised as having its workers hard pressed to work a total of 40 hours per week.  There is good earning potential, though it would take awhile and some luck to catch up to biglaw.  Having a life outside of work would be the trade-off.

It's difficult for me to think of many other professions where working 40 hours and completely leaving your work at the office will provide both a lot of pay and make you good at what you do.  Those people that I know that are intent on 40 hours per week get their 2-4% raises per year and make slow (though steady for the most part) progress.  There are two main kinds of employees.  The first is the kind that is there for the paycheck and only the paycheck.  This is not bad in any way, but it is what it is and constitutes a large percentage of the work force.  The second is the kind that has a passionate interest in what they do and sees the success of the business as their personal responsibility.  Working 8:30-5:30 is not their concern - success is their concern.  It's a significant paradigm shift for most people to move from the first kind to the second kind of employee.  You don't have to be a workaholic to be like the second kind of employee, but you can't expect that everything you need to do to be the best you can will always fit in Mon-Fri 8:30-5:30 or whatever. 

While it is greatly encouraging to see young people here be congnizant of the fact that some professions have a darker side that needs to be watched out for, many threads on these forums are also depressing.  People who have little work experience will make threads about trying to get as much money for as little effort as possible.  Newsflash:  that does not make you stick out from the crowd.  What makes you stick out is the desire to be great at whatever it is that you do along with how you treat people.  Again, I am glad that many people are aware of the trap that biglaw firms are  ;D, but a hold-your-nose approach to work isn't going to impress a lot of employers either. 

17
Georgia State / Re: Class of 2011
« on: August 12, 2008, 10:13:22 PM »
The sessions themselves are great.  As an evening student, however, I have two issues with orientation:

1)  The orientation (which is "mandatory") starts around 3:00-4:00 each day for the evening students.  There is a reason I am an evening student, and getting off of work around 2:00 is not it.  I understand we only do it once, and I was obviously there, but I wasn't a fan of that.

2)  The long check-in and reception on the first day seemed like a big waste of time to me - especially since I was cutting out of work early to attend it.  I understand there is value in having us mingle, but it's not really helping me get through law school by scarfing down finger food and listening to nervous chatter.

The sessions themselves and the faculty and staff have been phenomenal, however, so my two gripes are very minor in relation to how great orientation has been so far. 

18
Georgia State / Re: Class of 2011
« on: August 11, 2008, 08:24:48 AM »
I finally paid attention to the schedule  ;D and realized that parts of orientation will have both FT and PT students together.  That's nice.

19
Georgia State / Re: Class of 2011
« on: August 10, 2008, 05:46:38 PM »
Perhaps "realistic" would be a better word.

Advisors have been posted. 

Also, is anybody bringing anything to orientation? 

20
Georgia State / Re: Class of 2011
« on: August 10, 2008, 12:26:39 AM »
(It's just the half-crazed students who are in debt, with mortgages, with families to feed, and real adult grownup problems who find this to be an issue.  And those students - please forgive me if I'm wrong - and God I would be soooo happy if I was - will be few and far between). 


On one hand, it is frustrating, because as adults  ;D, we know how a good business would run things.  On the other, we are cynical enough to know that there is little motivation for universities to provide a high level of service in this area. 


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