Law School Discussion

Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - Connelly

Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 5 6
11
Minority and Non-Traditional Law Students / Re: for us older folk...
« on: October 09, 2008, 01:39:49 PM »
I miss working
I miss earning money, and
I miss being around people my own age

(sorry 20-somethings, you are boring :) )

I am a youngin' at 28, but your last point is good.  I am attending a part-time program and fear I would have choked some of the students in the full-time program.  The difference between the day and the night students was brough into stark contrast by the "keg party" invitation sent out through Facebook.

The part-time students also have a much broader range of backgrounds.  Half the fun is finding out the background of the people I'm going to school with. 

 

What's wrong with keg parties?  If I didn't live so far away from campus, I'd be right there alongside the "youngin's." 

Nothing...it's just that the appeal of having a party centered around a keg was lost on me around the time I was old enough to purchase a keg.  I hear very few adults inquire about when the next kegger is. 

12
Minority and Non-Traditional Law Students / Re: for us older folk...
« on: October 06, 2008, 08:33:33 AM »
I miss working
I miss earning money, and
I miss being around people my own age

(sorry 20-somethings, you are boring :) )

I am a youngin' at 28, but your last point is good.  I am attending a part-time program and fear I would have choked some of the students in the full-time program.  The difference between the day and the night students was brough into stark contrast by the "keg party" invitation sent out through Facebook.

The part-time students also have a much broader range of backgrounds.  Half the fun is finding out the background of the people I'm going to school with. 

 

13
Current Law Students / Re: What do you seek in a note taking software?
« on: October 01, 2008, 10:08:27 AM »
Like on OneNote you can do screen captures, links from Lexis/Westlaw (legal databases), send e-mail to your notes, synch to-dos with Outlook, and keep audio notes to yourself.

These features were pretty helpful.  I like to be able to take appointments in Outlook and make them into notes. 

14
Current Law Students / Re: What do you seek in a note taking software?
« on: October 01, 2008, 08:47:29 AM »


Note taking software is pretty useless during class or a meeting.  It ends up preventing you on focusing on the information being discussed.  Retention will be much better if you understand what is being said.  I do, however, love OneNote for going in after class or a meeting and entering my notes.  Freedom to drag, drop, copy, paste, insert documents, etc. is all good.  The reason I chose OneNote over Evernote is that OneNote organizes the pages better than OneNote does.  I like to group things by a major subject (work, school, finances, etc.), then by a subject, and then include separate pages under each subject. 

15
Current Law Students / Re: PArt-Time Programs
« on: August 28, 2008, 09:36:39 AM »
Almost every firm requests transcripts; if I were an attorney evaluating a candidate who had failed to mention on his resume or in the interview that he was a part-time student and I got the transcripts, I'd think he was dishonest and have some unanswered questions.  (Like... do you have a full-time job?  Are you planning to stay in that job?  If not, what are you doing with your extra time?)

I agree with this.  As a part-time student who is also working full-time plus overtime, I would WANT to make it clear to future employers that I handled the load that I currently am handling.  You also have to think that if they DO have a problem with you being a PT student, then you will eventually have problems there anyway.  If they don't have a problem with it...well then why not tell them? 

16
Job Search / Re: Real deal on law firm life
« on: August 19, 2008, 08:03:11 AM »
Actuary is a job that is often advertised as having its workers hard pressed to work a total of 40 hours per week.  There is good earning potential, though it would take awhile and some luck to catch up to biglaw.  Having a life outside of work would be the trade-off.

It's difficult for me to think of many other professions where working 40 hours and completely leaving your work at the office will provide both a lot of pay and make you good at what you do.  Those people that I know that are intent on 40 hours per week get their 2-4% raises per year and make slow (though steady for the most part) progress.  There are two main kinds of employees.  The first is the kind that is there for the paycheck and only the paycheck.  This is not bad in any way, but it is what it is and constitutes a large percentage of the work force.  The second is the kind that has a passionate interest in what they do and sees the success of the business as their personal responsibility.  Working 8:30-5:30 is not their concern - success is their concern.  It's a significant paradigm shift for most people to move from the first kind to the second kind of employee.  You don't have to be a workaholic to be like the second kind of employee, but you can't expect that everything you need to do to be the best you can will always fit in Mon-Fri 8:30-5:30 or whatever. 

While it is greatly encouraging to see young people here be congnizant of the fact that some professions have a darker side that needs to be watched out for, many threads on these forums are also depressing.  People who have little work experience will make threads about trying to get as much money for as little effort as possible.  Newsflash:  that does not make you stick out from the crowd.  What makes you stick out is the desire to be great at whatever it is that you do along with how you treat people.  Again, I am glad that many people are aware of the trap that biglaw firms are  ;D, but a hold-your-nose approach to work isn't going to impress a lot of employers either. 

17
Seems like you just shoot for the best school you can get into.  In addition, is a good method to shoot for applying to 7-10 schools - some slightly above your expectations, some in line and some as fall back schools?

For the most part, this is good advice.  There are some more things to consider as well, though.  If you don't care about moving or where you'll be working when you get out of law school, then balancing the ranking of the school and the cost of attending will be your biggest task.  Note that if you want to work in a certain state or region, that attending a regional school can trump a large rankings advantage, to a point.  If you want to work in Mississippi, for example, going to Ole Miss would be a better choice than going to a school ranked 30 spots above it.  However, going to Harvard would be better (though overkill from a cost and stress perspective). 

You may also end up applying to a lot more than 10 schools depending on your goals and your credentials.  If you know you want to work in a certain region, there is a smaller list of schools that will make sense for you to apply to.  If you could work in 5-10 cities throughout the country, then there could easily be 20+ schools that would be worth applying to.  While much of the law school application process is straightforward, sometimes results can seem like a crap shoot. 

As mentioned above, finances need to be considered.  A free ride to a school ranked 10 positions lower than another one you would be paying full tuition at might be a good deal - or it might not.

Also, will you be attending full-time or part-time?   

18
Choosing the Right Law School / Re: IP Law
« on: July 25, 2008, 10:46:57 AM »
This was by far the most comprehensive and intelligent answer I have ever received on this issue.

Agreed; that was a great response.

19
What Matthies said.  Also check out the 25-75th percentile GPA's and LSAT scores of the school(s) you are interested in.  This would give you a better idea of how each school is on this issue. 

I think money is also much more scarce.  My feelings are that the part-time program is more of a revenue generator than anything else.

20
Current Law Students / Re: book totin' question
« on: July 22, 2008, 03:03:24 PM »
This dilemma is just another way in which law school does not prepare you for firm life.  If they were really training you to be a lawyer, they would have operations assistants bring your books to class for you.  Don't even get me started on law schools making you take tests without an administrative assistant present. 

Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 5 6