Law School Discussion

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Messages - contrarian

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101
General Board / Re: how do law schools view online undergraduate degrees?
« on: December 02, 2007, 11:03:13 AM »
Wow this is real accurate. I'm sure that any school is considered better than other schools because they either do not offer online degrees, or they just have four walls that students actually come to every day.

Reconcile the difference: because online schools are known to be less stringent and  restrictive in the quality of students they admit and in their grading structures.  It's nothing to do with being brick and mortar it's because they graduate anyone with a pulse and money, and I'm not sure about the pulse. 

I've also stated that online programs have their own reputations of quality.  Those associated with traditional schools are much better regarded than those who are strictly online and private who are known for graduating anyone.

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Genius. No one with any knowledge of online degrees frowns upon them as long as they come from accredited schools.

It's called cognitive dissonance.

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They teach the students just as well, but some studies show better, than brick and mortar schools.

Studies sponsored by online institutions and associations.

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Comparing Harvard is not accurate, because most people do not go to an Ivy league school.

U of I vs. DeVry - I promise you there is absolutely no f**cking comparison and this is from real world relevant working experience in the industry.  U of I is respected.  DeVry doesn't even qualify as TTT.  It's sceptic tank. I worked with some of the Devry Online instructors and they were pretty dense.  They are the epitome of the expression that those who can't do teach.

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Most online degrees will be viewed as any other small college that is not prestigious.  It is like the other poster said, if you have a 177 LSAT they could care less where you went to school, or what your GPA was.

Even Illinois lower state schools are considered significantly more prestigious than DeVry, and I'm comparing the brick and mortars.   

Also, some online program are insecure.  Anyone who is sufficiently intelligent in computers (which would preclude their comp sci students  ;D ) can cheat.

102
General Board / Re: how do law schools view online undergraduate degrees?
« on: December 02, 2007, 10:42:14 AM »
Think about this:

Which would you rather have when applying?

2.1/177
3.9/150

Try this...

You have one spot remaining unfilled, the next two people up on the waiting list are:

Jack - University of Illinois - computer science - 164/3.06
John - Devry University Online - computer information systems - 163/3.87

Who do you offer it to?

(This is a trick question - nobody who went to Devry would score over a 150)

103
General Board / Re: how do law schools view online undergraduate degrees?
« on: November 29, 2007, 04:58:41 PM »
I think it's rather ignorant to assume the admissions people, whose job it is to evaluate thousands of applications a year, wouldn't be cognizant of undergraduate institutions and their relative reputation of quality. 

That said, even online schools have varying degrees of reputation.  I think it would be not be as beneficial as a degree from, say, Harvard if you were applying to a T1, but the lower down on the totem pole you get the less they will care.  From what I can tell of the bottom tier schools, they'd take you as long as you have a pulse and money... and i'm not too sure about that pulse requirement. 


This is not accurate at all. The admissions department really only care about your LSAT, and then they care a little bit about your GPA. This is true for any school. If you are borderline they will look at soft factors, but that is about it. Obviously a guy that got a 3.6 from Harvard is going to be taken on the border over a guy who got a 3.6 from a less recognized school. There are only a few schools that will take you if you have a pulse and money, all are currently T4's... Every school turns down applicants every year though. About half of the applicants who apply to law school get in nowhere.


TITCR.  Law school admission is overwhelmingly based on LSAT, then to a much lesser extent UGPA, then school's reputation is almost a non-factor.  The only way your UG matter is if you went to Harvard and they want to brag that Harvard grads attend their law school.

Wrong!  Sakuli responds to an argument about the weight of the LSAT over other factors that was not part of the original statement.  Nowhere do I state that the reputation of the school trumps LSAT or UGPA.  I  even say that it becomes less relevant for the less prestigious schools, nowhere saying to what extent that relevancy originally had except that Harvard will hold a higher weight over University of Phoenix.

I have five years work experience with e-learning institutions.  As far as reputation goes, brick and mortar (especially top tier) will trump the online schools.  Doesn't mean that that is a significant factor, but it is out there. 

104
General Board / Re: Hot Law School Chicks
« on: November 24, 2007, 04:08:45 AM »
0% Smoking hot (model like); 1-2% good looking sorority-type girls.  I personally avoid law school girls, stick with the undergrads or grad programs in medicine/health (nursing, PA, PT, Pharmacy, etc)

Hate to bust your fantasy but "Smoking hot(model-like)" is 0% in the real world.  The imperfections in these women are photoshopped or hidden.  The only difference between a really good looking hot girl and a model is having the skill to act like a model and the desire to be a vapid whore whose sole point on this planet is to smile for the camera.

105
General Board / Re: how do law schools view online undergraduate degrees?
« on: November 24, 2007, 03:54:43 AM »
I think it's rather ignorant to assume the admissions people, whose job it is to evaluate thousands of applications a year, wouldn't be cognizant of undergraduate institutions and their relative reputation of quality. 

That said, even online schools have varying degrees of reputation.  I think it would be not be as beneficial as a degree from, say, Harvard if you were applying to a T1, but the lower down on the totem pole you get the less they will care.  From what I can tell of the bottom tier schools, they'd take you as long as you have a pulse and money... and i'm not too sure about that pulse requirement. 

106
General Board / Re: I love law school
« on: November 24, 2007, 03:45:17 AM »
Men call other men fags as a friendly note to them that they're being retarded, it doesn't involve hate. Oh I loathe PC talk, yawn.

Unfortunately calling someone who does something retarded a retard is now also politically incorrect.  How f-ing retarded is that?

What's most offensively annoying about that is that the retards are too stupid to actually be offended by the calling of an otherwise normally intelligent person a retard.  It's the too-sensitive-to-live-in-modern-society types that are the ones who get all uppity about it. 

107
General Board / Re: I love law school
« on: November 24, 2007, 03:38:41 AM »
i don't think it was the calling the guy a "fag" that set everyone off- it is the fact that you are in law school and cannot distinguish between "your" and "you're".  You mean to say "you're (you are) a fag", not "your fag" as in saying you are his fag. 

It's funny, I've been online for about 25 years now and in the past few months the whole "your"/"you're" thing has become a truly annoying meme.  Please, get over it already.  Only anal retentive grammar Nazis give a *&^% about proper spelling. 

As the long time expression goes, if you have to resort to attacking a person's grammar, then you've lost the argument. 

108
Who the hell makes $200k a year and only takes the $3500 deduction but gives $10,000 to charity.

109
Law School Applications / Re: Is it cool to wear law t-shirts?
« on: February 27, 2008, 08:55:56 AM »
How about a princeton law school shirt?

110
Studying for the LSAT / Re: Symbolic Logic Classes?
« on: February 25, 2008, 09:55:35 AM »
I think everyone should take a logic class anyways, not just for the LSAT.

The world would be a much better place if people had more formal logic training.

To answer the OP post, I had basic and advanced logic in college many years ago, and I found the skills to be useful for some of the question types.  I also still find the concepts and knowledge useful in every day life.

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