Law School Discussion

Nine Years of Discussion
;

Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.

Messages - treefity350

Pages: [1] 2 3 4 5 6 ... 30
1
General Board / Re: Summer Housing Thread
« on: February 13, 2010, 01:59:17 PM »
Looking for a place in LA for me and the wife for the summer--preferably Santa Monica, but would take anything within a half hour of Century City. Must be cool with a dog.

Also, I'm subletting my place in Chicago--it's in Hyde Park; not the best neighborhood, but it's a HUGE 1 BR and cheap (850/mo)--available June 1 to Aug 31

2
Whatever major you end with, take every formal logic class that your school offers. Logic class=class credit for LSAT prep.

Completely unnecessary.  Worse, most students I taught who had taken formal logic tended to overthink everything.

I should note that I disagree vehemently. Both LR and LG are based on formal logic. Taking formal logic forces you to think in terms of closed systems, which is exactly what you will be faced with on the LSAT. I'm not even sure what you mean by "overthink." I suppose you mean those students who have a hard time recognizing that two different words or expressions refer to the "same" concept, but this is not a problem that would be induced by taking formal logic, in fact it is sort of prelogical, in that you have to recognize the terms before you can start thinking about how premises connect to conclusions.

Honestly, I don't understand how anyone who has spent any time with the LSAT could suggest that taking formal logic is a bad idea.

3
Whatever major you end with, take every formal logic class that your school offers. Logic class=class credit for LSAT prep.

4
Studying for the LSAT / Re: What's a realistic target score?
« on: November 14, 2009, 05:43:08 PM »
173/3.76 with no relevant work experience here. I was in at Boalt 36 hours after they got my app--a 173 should do it, especially if you're in-state. Harvard, its harder to tell. I was waitlisted, and dropped off the list when I got in where I wanted, so I don't know. I know of plenty of others with the same numbers as me who got either straight up rejected or accepted. Stanford's a tough school to get into, period. But in any case, your target score should be a 180--why shoot for less than perfect?

5
General Off-Topic Board / Re: What are you reading right now?
« on: November 12, 2009, 08:14:55 PM »
Gödel, Escher, Bach

6
Where should I go next fall? / Re: Really no jobs for T14 grads?
« on: October 31, 2009, 12:29:40 PM »
The truth is that this year there were many fewer 2L hires (in terms of top-of-the-market private firms), and things will probably only be marginally better for the class of 2012. But if you're not yet in law school, I wouldn't worry too much about finding a top of the market job if you gain acceptance to a top program (although I would suggest that the 160 standard - rather than the 145 many firms are going to now - will probably take at least 5 years to return in full). The market will pick up. If you entered law school next Fall, you'd probably still face some slowness in the job market when it comes to 2L hiring, but I think (and hope) its safe to say that the Classes of 2010-12 will probably see the worst of the downturn.

There will still be a large inventory of unemployed JDs/Attorneys (class of 2007-2012 and laid off attorneys) in the year 2013 and beyond.   :o

Imagine car companies continue to make the same number of cars, but for 5 years or so, very few consumers actually buy cars.  When a healthy number of consumers are ready to buy cars again, can you imagine how many cars are in the market already ready to be sold.

Right, but consumers buying the nicest cars don't buy the models from three or four years ago that have been sitting on the lot unused. Instead they buy the cars made that year--and the manufacturer takes a loss for those years that the market was in turmoil.

7
Where should I go next fall? / Re: Really no jobs for T14 grads?
« on: October 31, 2009, 03:04:09 AM »
The truth is that this year there were many fewer 2L hires (in terms of top-of-the-market private firms), and things will probably only be marginally better for the class of 2012. But if you're not yet in law school, I wouldn't worry too much about finding a top of the market job if you gain acceptance to a top program (although I would suggest that the 160 standard - rather than the 145 many firms are going to now - will probably take at least 5 years to return in full). The market will pick up. If you entered law school next Fall, you'd probably still face some slowness in the job market when it comes to 2L hiring, but I think (and hope) its safe to say that the Classes of 2010-12 will probably see the worst of the downturn.

8
Studying for the LSAT / Re: Is Prep a Rip Off?
« on: October 22, 2009, 11:09:29 AM »
I don't think that it is fair to say that these classes are a rip off. Granted, I've been teaching for one of these companies for over a year now, so I do have a vested interest, but it is this experience which makes me so sure that the classes are not useless. I have personally seen students improve by over 20 points in an 8 week course--that's a move that takes you from a point to where it's questionable whether you will be able to go to law school at all to acceptance in a top 10 program. I will not deny that there is some level of inherent intelligence involved, but for many, many students the problem is not lack of ability, but that they have not ever been exposed to this type of thinking before and need a structure through which to consider these types of problems. Could they do it cheaper? Sure. Nothing that you will learn in a course is something that you couldn't have learned with the help of a couple of 50 dollar prep books and perhaps an Intro to Symbolic Logic textbook. I was in the 99th percentile when I took the test and hadn't taken a class--my prep consisted of 6 practice tests and a couple of hours looking through a crappy Kaplan book. But I was a philosophy minor and had spent two semesters studying formal logic. What classes provide to students is not, for the most part, "secrets" to the test. And this is not what most students are paying for. Instead, what we provide is a structure that moves progressively through logical concepts and question types. It can be analogized (although imperfectly) to a college education. Everything you'll learn for your 160,000 bucks at Harvard you could have learned by reading the material on your own, but would you argue that the only added value from a college education is that you get a degree at the end? Of course not. There are real advantages to the classroom setting and the structure provided by syllabi (especially when those syllabi are created by individuals who have already done all the reading).

9
If you have good enough grades to transfer to Yale, you'll have good enough grades to work wherever you want out of Chicago.

titcr

10
Half the adcomms probably smoke pot anyway.  Not a big deal I would guess.

TITCR

Pages: [1] 2 3 4 5 6 ... 30