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Messages - middlelanguage

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31
Reviews, Visits, and Rankings / Re: Intellectual Property
« on: July 29, 2007, 10:50:32 PM »
Agreed, it will give you fodder for your personal statement, and it probably won't hurt your marketability--then again, it probably won't increase it that much. Analysis of musical compositions is done by experts. Typically, the firm you work for will need an expert opinion that is not from its own attorney.

Oh I am sure that it won't help all too much in the marketplace, but it could help my PS and help get me into a better school which WOULD help my marketability...  Plus, I am not 100% sure I want to do IP - I won;t make THAT kind of decision until I take classes and decide what area of law I like best.  Plus, I am thinking of doing a JD/PhD in musicology just to "finish what I started" in my masters.


That may be true, if your PS has any impact whatsoever (which it probably won't). Also, you weren't discussing your marketability vis a vis your school rank; you were discussing the use of your skills in litigation(Re: "I'm completing my graduate degree in musicology and hope to use the skills I've learned (analytic techniques, comparative analysis, etc) to work on the cases of composers/artists in litigation over people stealing their music (in the Avril Levine case, both sides are paying big bucks to hire musicologists as experts)").

That's the discussion to which I was referring. 

To address the other poster: Also, you don't need to sit for the patent bar to practice IP, or even to practice Patent Litigation (although I suspect that you were just referring to "hope" in the sense that people who don't take the patent bar will have a harder time breaking into the IP scene).

32
Reviews, Visits, and Rankings / Re: Intellectual Property
« on: July 29, 2007, 06:45:42 PM »
Agreed, it will give you fodder for your personal statement, and it probably won't hurt your marketability--then again, it probably won't increase it that much. Analysis of musical compositions is done by experts. Typically, the firm you work for will need an expert opinion that is not from its own attorney.

33
Reviews, Visits, and Rankings / Re: Intellectual Property
« on: July 29, 2007, 05:10:48 PM »
Law firms are increasingly examining the feasibility of paying their IP law associates higher salaries than non-IP associates in order to better attract those with relevant backgrounds in IP-related fields (science/engineering/etc).

I hope they'll think of doing this on the OTHER side of IP.  I'm completing my graduate degree in musicology and hope to use the skills I've learned (analytic techniques, comparative analysis, etc) to work on the cases of composers/artists in litigation over people stealing their music (in the Avril Levine case, both sides are paying big bucks to hire musicologists as experts).

I'm not trying to denigrate your optimism, but completing your musicology degree will not increase your chances of getting a job as a lawyer. Maybe you can be a music expert, but very few cases actually go to trial, and even fewer involve music experts. So, even if you become an *expert*, your chances of working on high profile cases are low. If you want to do soft-IP, trademark typically has a larger practical application.

34
Reviews, Visits, and Rankings / Re: Chicago-Kent 3L Taking Q's
« on: July 27, 2007, 05:02:17 PM »
I wouldn't worry about the alumni network. LUC's network is large, and they have alumni at almost every firm. Good luck in your first year. Any questions, just PM me.

35
Reviews, Visits, and Rankings / Re: Chicago-Kent 3L Taking Q's
« on: July 27, 2007, 08:58:28 AM »
excuse me then, I thought you said 12 callbacks, not interviews --- my reading comprehension skills are clearly lacking.

I've probably met 3-5x more alumni from Kent than any other single school. Probably, this is just by chance, but it makes me anxious b/c those ppl seemed like good lawyers and I decided to venture in another direction...

Ahh, most ppl just shake their heads and say "no major difference" (in quality).

Are you going to LUC? Depaul? Neither?

36
Reviews, Visits, and Rankings / Re: Chicago-Kent 3L Taking Q's
« on: July 26, 2007, 02:38:56 PM »
Hi middlelanguage:

You said that you got 12 interviews through OCI and that you were in top 15% of class and specializing in IP.  Do you think you got more interviews than others in top 15% because of the IP specialization (e.g. did that increase your desirability to firms), or was that not a factor?

Again, I had always heard that BIGLAW cutoffs for OCI at Kent were about 5%, whereas you mention 15-20%.  Is this specifically for IP, or are firms starting to recruit deeper into Kent class because of perceived increase in quality of students?

Just curious!

My IP specialization has absolutely nothing to do with my interviews. I do not have a technical background. Cut-offs for K&E and Sidley are around 5%, but I didn't get interviews with those firms. Most firms don't have such stringent cut-offs. Some even reach into the top 30%. Also, even if you don't meet the % criteria, you can still apply to interview if you are within 10% of the firm's cut-off. So, to answer your question, my IP background (of which I had NONE at the time of the interviews) did not factor into my interview schedule. In fact, it DISCOURAGED some firms that had a small IP practice. Hope that helps.

37
Reviews, Visits, and Rankings / Re: Chicago-Kent 3L Taking Q's
« on: July 26, 2007, 10:25:04 AM »
The Professors for the PT program are typically professors for the FT as well. The faculty typically rotates each semester. Sometimes one Prof. will teach a day and night class, other times they will teach one day class one semester and one night class the next semester.

If you are wondering about the quality of the profs., it would follow from my discussion above that the quality is the same. The students, however, are different. Many students from the PT program transfer into the FT program, though.

Anything else?

38
Reviews, Visits, and Rankings / Re: Chicago-Kent 3L Taking Q's
« on: July 23, 2007, 08:32:11 PM »
Competition. To be involved at OCI at Kent, you have to be at least in the top 1/3 of the class, but you need to be in the top 15% (maybe 20%) to land more than a few interviews (i.e., BIGLAW) That being said,  cut-offs for Loyola and Depaul are either equal or worse. I was in the top 15% at the time of OCI and I had around 12 interviews, which is pretty good. If you rank higher, I'm guessing you'd probably get more. I think firms are starting to loosen their requirements. There are also, much to my surprise, a significant number of OCI interviews for 3Ls. While I will not be participating, I noticed that the requirements for interviews were looser, if not less stringent altogether.

Differences in Schools. The reputational differences between Loyola and Kent is negligible.   Both schools are better regarded than Depaul, so I'd keep that in mind. Also, Kent has a great IP program, which many other schools, including U of C and NU, don't. Also bear in mind that Depaul just recently moved into the second tier. I cannot speak for the experiences of students at other schools, but I'd choose Kent over Loyola and Depaul again.

39
Reviews, Visits, and Rankings / Re: Chicago-Kent 3L Taking Q's
« on: July 23, 2007, 05:55:17 PM »
1. Atmosphere. For the most part, everyone is very friendly and collegial. Like any law school, there are a few gunners, though none of them is particularly malicious. There certainly are "cliques," but not to the extent there are at other law schools. Parties always had open invitations to everyone and no one cared who came. Many, if not most, people hung around at the library to study. Like any other school, it depends on the students' preferences.

2. Popular living arrangements for students. Presidential towers is popular because it is one block from the law school, but I highly discourage you from renting there. Most students rent an apartment--anywhere in Chicago typically works. The school is building student housing, I think, but I'm not sure when that will be completed. Typically, rent can range from $500-1300+ a month depending where you live and if you have roommates. 

3. The facilities. These are great. The building is relatively new (less than 10 years old I think). The classrooms are all wired and wireless, as is the rest of  the building. The School is in the "West Loop." The area is two blocks from the Sears Tower. It's not the "Loop," but its close enough. It's a city.

4. Name Recognition. Not a problem in Chicago. Unless you go to UC or NU, you will have stiff competition. If you want to practice outside of Chicago, I am less knowledgeable. I do know people working in Boston, Minneapolis, CA, and NY, however. The name recognition problem is the same at Kent as at any other similarly ranked school.

5. IP. No, you wouldn't be naive. While the school has a very good IP program (I am in it), it also has top rate programs in other areas, such as Environmental law, Employment law, Public interest law, etc. The professors are typically very good.

Also, its worth noting that the school has a great externship program. Essentially, this program allows you to work in real world situations, including working for state, local, and federal judges.

40
Reviews, Visits, and Rankings / Chicago-Kent 3L Taking Q's
« on: July 23, 2007, 03:16:24 PM »
Preliminary Facts:

Top 5%
No Law Review
Moot Court
1L Summer: Judicial Externship
2L Summer: BIGLAW

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