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Messages - HtownsFinest

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31
There are a few, extreme situations like this. By no means does it justify setting up massive hurdles for a large segment of the population. Generalizing from individual anecdotes is akin to mere speculation. I'm sure my Jewish friends, who are still the target of anti-semitic behavior, won't mind the hurdles thrown in their way by affirmative action. I know, I know; they've had it easy... the systematic persecution of Jews this past century must've been a boon to them.

32
Studying for the LSAT / Re: Still in tears from June test
« on: July 09, 2007, 09:55:31 PM »
Actually, "if it were a word" is correct usage.

And what is your contention about the past tense? This little debate isn't about the past tense. If you want a parallel to the OP's "to be abjectified" there is "to be beautified," which is, of course, correct usage. Do you claim that beautify is not a verb?

No, I claim that it's a converted form of the noun beauty. Were trying to go from an adjective to a verb, which I'm just pointing out seems to be kind of hard to do :D
Ok. I see where you're coming from now but the distinction still doesn't make sense. There's no difference between going from beauty > beautify and beautiful > beautify. In fact, the verb form of abject is.... "abject."

33
Minority Topics / Re: Minorities DON'T Make Partner at BigLaw?
« on: July 09, 2007, 09:47:12 PM »
This topic is addressed at considerable length in a recent Law Review article by Richard Sander (UCLA Law Prof)

It can be found here: http://www.law.ucla.edu/sander/NorthCarolina/sander.pdf

Here's the abstract:

Quote
THE RACIAL PARADOX OF THE CORPORATE LAW FIRM
RICHARD H. SANDER∗

Although nonwhites now account for nearly one-fifth of new attorneys, they still make up less than four percent of the partners at large law firms. Most commentators have blamed some combination of firm discrimination and minority disinterest for this disparity. In this Article, the author uses several new sources of data to explore this phenomenon, finding significant support for the following findings. Each of the major nonwhite groups (Asians, Hispanics and blacks) are as interested during law school in careers with large firms as are whites. Large law firms use very large hiring preferences for blacks, with the result that blacks are overrepresented among firm hires (relative to their numbers among
law graduates) and tend to have much lower grades than their white counterparts. The large preferences are plausibly linked to a variety of counterproductive mechanisms that cumulatively produce very high black attrition from firms and consequently low partnership rates. Similar patterns, on a less intense scale, affect Hispanics entering large firms. While many questions are open, the author concludes that aggressive racial preferences at the law school and law firm level tend to undermine in some ways the careers of young attorneys and may, in the end, contribute to the continuing white dominance of large-firm partnerships.


So basically, TCR is that AA is to blame. The playing field has been leveled at almost every point (ugrad, grad, oci), and the PC crowd just wants more.

34
Studying for the LSAT / Re: Still in tears from June test
« on: July 09, 2007, 09:28:51 PM »
Actually, "if it were a word" is correct usage.

And what is your contention about the past tense? This little debate isn't about the past tense. If you want a parallel to the OP's "to be abjectified" there is "to be beautified," which is, of course, correct usage. Do you claim that beautify is not a verb?

35
Studying for the LSAT / Re: Still in tears from June test
« on: July 09, 2007, 08:56:45 PM »
why would that possibly matter?  I'm not going to lawschool to be abjectified by you.


Abject:

1. utterly hopeless, miserable, humiliating, or wretched: abject poverty. 
2. contemptible; despicable; base-spirited: an abject coward. 
3. shamelessly servile; slavish. 

Objectified:

to present as an object, esp. of sight, touch, or other physical sense; make objective; externalize.


The OP actually deserves credit for coining a new word:  To objectify as an abject sexual object.


Except that abject is an adjective  ;)


Perhaps, but abjectify is a verb!
If only it were a word...

but I completely agree, even though the word does not exist, abjectify would be the verb form of abject.

Yeah, if it was a word. But as any linguist worth his salt knows, the litmus test for whether something is an acceptable word is that it sounds acceptable. I'm sorry, but I can not say 'I abjectified him' without getting nauseous.

Come to think of it, it's hard to turn adjectives into verbs generally...

Nouns are easy - i.e. beauty to beautify or Google to Googled - but adjectives are tricky. Does beautiful to beautifuled make anyone else cringe?
Try: "Beautify"... it's a word.
You know what also makes me nauseous? "if it was a word" - whatever happened to the subjunctive in the English language? "if it were a word"

just giving you a hard time

36
Studying for the LSAT / Re: Test 18 / Inference Question
« on: July 09, 2007, 08:19:22 PM »
A. I will explain later if I decide to forgive you for your obnoxious parody thread.

37
LOL @ this exchange. I didn't know that that was 98-99th percentile.. That seems like a pretty narrow normal distribution. So where do people who eventually get 177+ start out? With a 175 on their first try?

38
130 tops. On a good day.
This sounds about right.

39
pw? THE pw?

40
Nah, please don't say things like that. I'm not looking for affirmation/validation, just an estimation.  ;)

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