Law School Discussion

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21
Non-Traditional Students / Re: Is it too late!!!
« on: November 07, 2009, 06:06:16 PM »
Took timed practice test today, scored 151, biggest problem was the logical reasoning.  Is there a downside to applying to a LS, getting turned down, then applying the next year?

Appreciate the input, just looking at the options.  Not applying to T14 schools.

There's nothing technically wrong with applying now and re-applying next year, but I want to just provide some words of caution.

Firstly, this seems like a very rushed decision.  Some of the best decisions in life are made on a whim but still, you may want to think more about this.  Law school is long, grueling and a huge investment (you may not have to worry about the money).  Make sure you really want to go to law school, you might not even need it.  If you really want to advocacy work, I don't know if a J.D. is required.

Secondly, if you apply this year after taking the LSAT, you can get into law school.  There are a lot of terrible law schools out there.  With a really good GPA and definitely interesting background story, you'll get into *A* school.  Because you'll probably get into a school this year, you're going to feel more inclined to just go rather than wait.  This may or may not be a good thing.  If you take some time and study for the LSAT and apply next year, you can get into a great school, but you may lose out on the opportunity because you have an acceptance in your hand and won't give taking the LSAT a second time any thought.

These are just some considerations...

22
How are you getting job offers if NALP prohibits employers from contact before Dec. 1?

It's not an NALP firm.  I worked there last summer and they offered me a position for this summer at higher pay.  I just don't know which direction I should go in and which would be better for me in the long run.


Why don't you try to split your summer at both?

23
Studying for the LSAT / Re: Hi - please help me with these Flaw problems
« on: October 22, 2009, 09:51:18 PM »
Ok, i'll bite...  It seems that you're missing the same point in both questions where the argument neglects other options.

So the first dude is arguing that good health is largely the result of making informed lifestyle choices because there was a strong correlation between the two in some studies.

Remember this:  correlation does not equal causation.  There are few ways we can see a flaw:  (1) the correlation goes the other way that being healthier causes one to become more educated or (2) there is another factor the explains both being healthy and being more educated (there might be more than these two options, but you get the drift).

For example, being rich may explain both being healthier and being more educated.  Rich people get better access to medical care.  Rich people have an easier time getting help with schooling.


You make similar mistakes for the other question.  The drug there reduced cholesterol and the argument says that "well, those with higher cholesterol die at higher rates."  But, there's nothing that says that cholesterol is the reason the people were living longer.  Maybe the drug produced XYZ chemical in the body which prevents heart attacks.

Fun stuff.

24
Law School Applications / Re: Is it too late for me?
« on: October 21, 2009, 09:31:31 PM »
Best advice is to start studying for the LSAT and see where you're at in terms of your scores.  If you want to go into corporate work for a big firm, you'd want to maximize your chances by going to the highest ranked school (although that won't even guarantee you a job as a corporate lawyer).  The December test is not too late for admissions.  In fact, the majority of law school applicants apply in December.  But, this discussion is really meaningless without an LSAT or even an idea as to where you might be scoring.

Thanks for the advice!

Are there schools that are better known for corporate law, but may not be as highly ranked for their "overall"? I'm just trying to think ahead and find the best "fit" school while also being realistic in terms of where I stand a good chance of being admitted. Again, since I have a pretty strong economics and finance background, this is also where my interest would be in terms of specific law fields.

Good to hear that the December LSAT is not too late, though. However, I would really need to get a move on since that exam is only a few weeks away. Do you recommend any sites for a free practice LSAT so I can take it and find out where I'm scoring right now, and that would help determine how much work I would need to put, if it's realistic, etc.?

The truth is that if you haven't started prepping for December yet, and you're not some sort of savant who just "gets" the LSAT, you won't be prepared in time for December.  I can understand the urge to get these things out the way so that you can just start at *any* school, but trust those who are in law school and tell you that it's in your best interest to go to the highest ranked school possible.

The legal profession is a very snooty profession.  There are no "sleeper" schools that are good at placing people in corporate practice.  You need to go to a good school and do well.  I suggest that you don't rush things this year.  Take your time somewhat.  Take a practice test.  See what your score is.  Then plan a way to study for the test.  This could include taking a test prep course or self-study, but be methodical and deliberate (in many ways that's what the test is really trying to get you to do).

Don't be afraid to take a year off.  I took a year off and worked at a law firm.  Best experience I had.  Mainly because I was certain that law school was for me and there was no doubt in my mind.

25
Law School Applications / Re: Is it too late for me?
« on: October 18, 2009, 11:50:33 PM »
Best advice is to start studying for the LSAT and see where you're at in terms of your scores.  If you want to go into corporate work for a big firm, you'd want to maximize your chances by going to the highest ranked school (although that won't even guarantee you a job as a corporate lawyer).  The December test is not too late for admissions.  In fact, the majority of law school applicants apply in December.  But, this discussion is really meaningless without an LSAT or even an idea as to where you might be scoring.

26
Where should I go next fall? / Re: EGH...low LSAT/high GPA
« on: October 18, 2009, 12:10:29 AM »
Retake the LSAT.

27
General Board / Re: Another Issue Spotting Question
« on: October 09, 2009, 11:51:14 AM »
Thanks.  I will try to find a middle ground somewhere.   Also is there any marked advantage to taking the exams on a laptop as opposed to writing?

Personally, I'd think you'd have to be crazy to want to write your exams, but it really does depend on the person.  If, somehow in this day and age, you're a *horrible* typist (really, really slow) and you're hand writing speed is faster, then maybe you'd want to write your exams.  But here are things to consider:

1.  These exams are long and, I remember, when I used to hand-write exams in college I would get cramps for an 1 1/2 hour tests.

2.  Typing exams gives you the advantage to go back and reorganize your work and change things with ease.

One of my friends from first year wrote his exams and did extremely well (read:  top 10%); but I did do better  :P

Of course that's in jest, but, in the end, it'd seem that what you'd feel most comfortable with is the way to go.  I think the biggest disadvantage to typing your exams is that you get into a certain mentality where you think that if you type the most, you'll get the most points.  This leads to poor analysis and just making very trivial arguments that aren't going to impress teachers.  When you write your exams, you have to think a lot more before you write b/c it isn't that easy to go back and change things.

28
General Board / Re: Another Issue Spotting Question
« on: October 09, 2009, 03:35:13 AM »
As with everything in law school, the answer lies somewhere in the middle.  You do want to spot as many issues as you can; but, with that being said, you have to realize that some of the issues on your test are going to be more contentious than others.  The art is to figure out which issues your teacher was trying to get you to focus on in-depth and make sure you analyze those thoroughly.  For other issues, you can sort of just raise them and quickly dismiss them sort of deal (or a short, simple analysis).

I'd write more on this, but it's late and I'm tired.  I'll check back tomorrow to see what other people think and maybe add some more of my thoughts.

29
Law School Applications / Re: Dropping a major?
« on: September 20, 2009, 03:58:19 PM »
In terms of applying to law schools, it won't make a difference if you finish the major or not.  They really only care about your GPA (provided you've majored in something that is of some substance -- which English should be fine with).

However, in terms of future value, I think you should finish the economics major.  Employers will value a candidate with a working knowledge in Economics.  Granted, you could tell them the number of classes you've taken, but with a degree behind your name there won't be much question.

In most cases, I'd say drop the major and add some valuable points to your GPA.  Because you're majoring in Econ., I think you should finish the major and play up that angle come recruiting time.

30
General Board / Re: NOT going to class
« on: September 09, 2009, 01:24:05 AM »
well here is my problem. I do all the readings and I still don't get anything from classes. Like I said, I do get few things here and there, but I doubt I'll remember any of those things after few hours. I do admit feeling lost a lot of the time, and as you said, I do agree that part of the problem is that I don't pay enough attention. Having said all that, I am seriously considering not going to class for a good reason. I think it gives me too much unnecessary stress that affects my daily routine of studying. (and I do respect people who go to class everyday, pay attention, and participate. It's just that I really don't think it will work for me) I have absolutely NO problem studying for 10 hours a day on my own (and when I do this, I actually understand the material, and I do feel like I learned something) so it's not like I am trying to skip classes because I am lazy or something.

To be honest, I will have absolutely no problem if I can just graduate with 2.0 GPA. I have my own plan after I graduate, but it is unnecessary for me to explain it here. The frustrating thing is, whenever I study on my own, I feel great and whenever I go to class, I feel horrible and won't study for the rest of the day because I either feel overwhelmed or depressed.

Hmm.. I don't know.  I just don't know if you can say with certainty that you're grasping the material studying on your own.  You might be.  But, I don't know.  I think you should still go to class and see what you can delineate from the discussion.  Write down the questions the professor asks and not the answers so much.

For waht it's worth, I do think anyone can get a C without going to class (probably straight B's even).

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